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You searched for +publisher:"Clemson University" +contributor:("Dr. Robert A. Latour, Committee Chair"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Abramyan, Tigran M. Computational Studies of Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Protein Adsorption on Material Surfaces.

Degree: PhD, Bioengineering, 2016, Clemson University

Protein adsorption at material surfaces is a fundamental concept in many scientific applications ranging from the biocompatibility of implant materials in bioengineering to cleaning environmental material surfaces from toxic proteins in the area of biodefense. Understanding the molecular-level details of protein-surface interactions is crucial for controlling protein adsorption. While a range of experimental techniques has been developed to study protein adsorption, these techniques cannot produce the fundamental molecular-level information of protein adsorption. All-atom empirical force field molecular dynamics (MD) simulations hold great promise as a valuable tool for elucidating and predicting the mechanisms governing protein adsorption. However, current MD simulation methods have not been validated for this application. This research addresses three limitations of the standard MD when applied to the simulations of the protein-surface interactions: (1) representation of the force field parameters governing the interactions of protein amino acids with the material surface; (2) cluster analysis of ensembles of adsorbed protein states obtained in protein-adsorption simulations, in which in addition to the conformation the orientation of the sampled states is also important; and (3) simulation time to ensure a significant level of conformational sampling to cover the entire rough energy landscape of such a large molecular system as protein adsorption. This study, thus, attempted to further advance protein-adsorption simulation methods using high-density polyethylene as a model materials surface. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Robert A. Latour, Committee Chair, Dr. Steven J. Stuart, Dr. Delphine Dean, Dr. Alexey Vertegel.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Abramyan, T. M. (2016). Computational Studies of Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Protein Adsorption on Material Surfaces. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1755

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Abramyan, Tigran M. “Computational Studies of Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Protein Adsorption on Material Surfaces.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed November 26, 2020. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1755.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Abramyan, Tigran M. “Computational Studies of Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Protein Adsorption on Material Surfaces.” 2016. Web. 26 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Abramyan TM. Computational Studies of Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Protein Adsorption on Material Surfaces. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 26]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1755.

Council of Science Editors:

Abramyan TM. Computational Studies of Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Protein Adsorption on Material Surfaces. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2016. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1755

2. Cholewczynski, Alexandra. Proof of Concept for a Urine-Based Method for Monitoring Blood Phenylalanine for Patients with PKU.

Degree: MS, Bioengineering, 2016, Clemson University

There is a great need for an at-home, simple, inexpensive, and noninvasive testing method to monitor the blood phenylalanine (Phe) levels of patients with PKU. PKU is a rare genetic disorder that affects approximately one out 15,000 people, which results in dangerously high levels of Phe in the blood. This project aims to show proof of concept for such a test, which is based upon a previously developed test method that was historically used to diagnose PKU from a urine sample. This redesigned test method represents the optimization of a little-understood reaction between Fe3+ ions and phenylpyruvic acid (PPA) that results in a color change. PPA is a metabolic byproduct of elevated blood Phe levels, thus enabling it to be used as an indicator of this genetic disease. The improved test increases sensitivity to the presence of PPA by two orders of magnitude over the previous method by including custom test substrates, controlled lighting conditions, and smart phone technology. The process by which the test substrates were developed is presented, as well as their performance for the quantification of PPA concentration in a urine sample. The additional accuracy of the refined method is primarily provided by the implementation of a custom-made device to control light conditions combined with the measurement of color using a smart phone to photograph test samples combined with an RGB color application for color quantification. The final test proposed is inexpensive, safe, and simple enough for a lay person to do at home. Further optimization and calibration to individuals with PKU will be needed for the test to be commercially viable. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Robert A. Latour, Committee Chair, Dr. George Chumanov, Dr. Delphine Dean.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cholewczynski, A. (2016). Proof of Concept for a Urine-Based Method for Monitoring Blood Phenylalanine for Patients with PKU. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2481

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cholewczynski, Alexandra. “Proof of Concept for a Urine-Based Method for Monitoring Blood Phenylalanine for Patients with PKU.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed November 26, 2020. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2481.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cholewczynski, Alexandra. “Proof of Concept for a Urine-Based Method for Monitoring Blood Phenylalanine for Patients with PKU.” 2016. Web. 26 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Cholewczynski A. Proof of Concept for a Urine-Based Method for Monitoring Blood Phenylalanine for Patients with PKU. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 26]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2481.

Council of Science Editors:

Cholewczynski A. Proof of Concept for a Urine-Based Method for Monitoring Blood Phenylalanine for Patients with PKU. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2016. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2481

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