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You searched for +publisher:"Clemson University" +contributor:("Dr. R, Kenneth Marcus, Committee Chair"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Clemson University

1. Harris, Sarah M. Analytical Evaluation of an Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Microplasma as an Emission Source.

Degree: MS, Chemistry, 2016, Clemson University

In scenarios such as environmental contamination or on-site nuclear analysis, an instrument capable of rapid, in-field chemical analysis would be faster and more cost-effective than the current practice of sending samples back to the laboratory for analysis. An ideal instrument for this purpose will consume little power, produce a small footprint, use small sample volumes with no sample preparation, produce no waste, and operate in ambient conditions while maintaining the high precision and accuracy needed to make time-sensitive decisions. The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) microplasma, developed by Marcus and co-workers, is a novel excitation source for atomic emission spectroscopy developed to meet these goals. This emission/ionization source meets the demands needed for field-capable instrumentation by being cost efficient and having a small footprint, low power consumption, high salt/matrix tolerance, and little to no waste production. The microplasma is generated in a 1-2 mm gap sheathed in a helium gas between a stainless steel electrode and an electrolytic solution. Since its conception, the LS-APGD has been used for a variety of sample mediums (e,g,, liquid, solid, and laser ablated particles) and as an elemental and an organic ionization source, and as an emission source for detection by mass spectrometry (MS) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES), respectively. Previous research employing the LS-APGD microplasma has assessed optimized components and operating parameters for multiple sample introductions and methods of detection. This work presents an analytical study of the LS-APGD microplasma as an emission source for solution samples. The goal of this research is to illustrate the capabilities of this emission source by quantitative assessment. An evaluation of the source in terms of line selection and theoretical limits of detection progresses the microplasma towards successful implementation while the analysis of matrix effects unveils broader capabilities of analysis and deeper understanding of the source. This characterization and examination of the LS-APGD microplasma, combined with past assessments, illustrates the potential of this source as a portable instrument for in-field elemental spectroscopy. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. R, Kenneth Marcus, Committee Chair, Dr. George Chumanov, Dr. Brian Powell.

Subjects/Keywords: Analytical; Emission Source; Matrix Effects; Microplasma; Spectroscopy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harris, S. M. (2016). Analytical Evaluation of an Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Microplasma as an Emission Source. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2327

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harris, Sarah M. “Analytical Evaluation of an Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Microplasma as an Emission Source.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed November 27, 2020. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2327.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harris, Sarah M. “Analytical Evaluation of an Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Microplasma as an Emission Source.” 2016. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Harris SM. Analytical Evaluation of an Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Microplasma as an Emission Source. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2327.

Council of Science Editors:

Harris SM. Analytical Evaluation of an Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Microplasma as an Emission Source. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2016. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2327

2. Haupt-Renaud, Paul. Evaluation of Next Generation Capillary-Channeled Polymer Fibers and the Implementation of C-CP Fiber Modification Modalities on Non-Fiber Substrates.

Degree: MS, Chemistry, 2016, Clemson University

Developing new stationary phases for liquid chromatography is continuing to drive high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) into the future. In this regard the Marcus’ group has been leveraging the continued advances of Capillary-Channeled Polymer (C-CP) fibers in an attempt to meet the demand of high throughput biomarcomolecule chromatography. Separation mechanisms studied include: ion-exchange (IC), reversed phase (RP), affinity, hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). In this work, the next generation of C-CP fiber stationary phases was thoroughly evaluated with respect to hydrodynamic concerns relating to protein chromatography. Traditionally C-CP fibers have eight channels that run co-linearly along the length of the fiber. Packed C-CP fibers form a network of pseudo-open capillary structures through channels interdigitating. The fibers studied have a much higher surface area to volume ratio compared to circular fibers with similar diameters. The open tubular network has an added bonus of operating at low back pressures. C-CP fibers are non-porous with regards to biomarcomolecules, resulting in fast mass transfer kinetics causing no significant C-term band broadening. The next generation of C-CP fiber has been developed with three larger more ridged channels. This design allows for tighter packing densities without compromising channel integrity. This advancement allows the fibers to operate at higher linear velocities leading to a separation of a six-protein suit (ribonuclease A, cytochrome C, lysozyme, transferrin, bovine serum albumin, and α-chimotrypsinogen) under reversed phase conditions. Surface modification of the C-CP fibers has been accomplished with a variety of techniques, both through covalent and physical adsorption modification. Of particular interest to this work is the Lipid Tethered Ligand (LTL) surface modification modality, which has seen excellent success when employed on polypropylene C-CP fibers. LTLs functionalize a surface with ion-exchange or affinity ligands through hydrophobic physical adsorption to augment the available surface chemistry in a quick and simple flow-through system. In the work presented here, the LTL system was applied to the most commonly used polymer resin, polystyrene-divinylbenzene. The effectiveness of LTL loading, stability, and kinetics on PS-DVB was evaluated. Ligand availability was evaluated with both biotin-LTL for the extraction of streptavidin and iminodiacetic acid-LTL for the extraction of methylene blue. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. R. Kenneth Marcus, Committee, Chair Dr. Jeffry Anker, Dr. Carlos Garcia.

Subjects/Keywords: C-CP Fibers; Fiber Chromatography; Lipid Tethered Ligands; Surface Modification

Clemson University. The Fibers were extruded with the traditional eight channels and in a new… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Haupt-Renaud, P. (2016). Evaluation of Next Generation Capillary-Channeled Polymer Fibers and the Implementation of C-CP Fiber Modification Modalities on Non-Fiber Substrates. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2343

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haupt-Renaud, Paul. “Evaluation of Next Generation Capillary-Channeled Polymer Fibers and the Implementation of C-CP Fiber Modification Modalities on Non-Fiber Substrates.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed November 27, 2020. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2343.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haupt-Renaud, Paul. “Evaluation of Next Generation Capillary-Channeled Polymer Fibers and the Implementation of C-CP Fiber Modification Modalities on Non-Fiber Substrates.” 2016. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Haupt-Renaud P. Evaluation of Next Generation Capillary-Channeled Polymer Fibers and the Implementation of C-CP Fiber Modification Modalities on Non-Fiber Substrates. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2343.

Council of Science Editors:

Haupt-Renaud P. Evaluation of Next Generation Capillary-Channeled Polymer Fibers and the Implementation of C-CP Fiber Modification Modalities on Non-Fiber Substrates. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2016. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2343

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