Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Clemson University" +contributor:("Dr. John R. Saylor"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Clemson University

1. Merrell, Tyler. Aerosol Removal in a Cylindrical Ultrasonic Standing Wave Field.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2016, Clemson University

Aerosols are solid particles or liquid drops typically less than 100 microns in diameter, suspended in a gas. Some types of aerosols can be very hazardous. Particulate pollution from the combustion of fossil fuels and other sources is of great concern due to health problems those exposed can experience. One method for removing these particles from industrial sources is wet scrubbing, where water sprays are used to capture particles before exhausting to the environment. Wet scrubbers work well for a large range of particle diameters, but are ineffective for particles on the order of 1 µm in diameter. Particles of this size are thought to be the most dangerous, as they can deposit deep in the human lungs. Liquid drops of this size can also be dangerous, but larger drops can as well, such as acid drops emitted from acid production plants. This work is concerned with collection of both solid particles and liquid drops. Previous researchers showed the ability to scavenge micron-scale particles from air streams using a combination of an ultrasonic standing wave field and water drops, where the standing wave field was generated with a disk shaped transducer. This prior setup was limited in both total particle removal efficiency and flow capacity. As such, improvements were needed to allow for both better overall particle collection, and ability to handle higher flow rates. These improvements could also translate into effective liquid aerosol removal in addition to particle removal. Cylindrical ultrasonic standing wave fields were studied as a method to remedy these problems and also provide an additional method for liquid aerosol capture. A customized cylindrical resonator was designed and constructed for use in removing both solid and liquid aerosols from air flows. The resonator consisted of a hollow metal cylinder driven by three Langevin transducers mounted on the midplane of the cylinder, evenly spaced around the circumference. Nodes in the cavity of the cylinder took the form of concentric cylinders which extended through the length of the cylinder. A frequency match was sought between the natural frequencies of the Langevins, the cylinder cavity, and the cylinder itself. With this setup, a strong cylindrical standing wave field was established. Experiments were performed to measure the aerosol collection capability of the cylin-drical resonator for two aerosol types: particle scrubbing of incense smoke with a water fog, and demisting of water drops. For particle scrubbing, the decrease in particle concentration measured by laser particle counters was used to find the particle collection efficiency for the setup. The particle collection efficiency was used as a metric to determine the effectiveness of the cylinder for different input powers and air flow rates. Demisting experiments were performed with a similar setup. Here, a mass based method was used to determine the amount of liquid collected by the system with the cylindrical resonator. The drop collec-tion efficiency, similar to the particle collection… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. John R. Saylor, Committee Chair, Dr. Hongseok Choi, Dr. Michael Porter.

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Merrell, T. (2016). Aerosol Removal in a Cylindrical Ultrasonic Standing Wave Field. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2453

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Merrell, Tyler. “Aerosol Removal in a Cylindrical Ultrasonic Standing Wave Field.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed January 24, 2021. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2453.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Merrell, Tyler. “Aerosol Removal in a Cylindrical Ultrasonic Standing Wave Field.” 2016. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Merrell T. Aerosol Removal in a Cylindrical Ultrasonic Standing Wave Field. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2453.

Council of Science Editors:

Merrell T. Aerosol Removal in a Cylindrical Ultrasonic Standing Wave Field. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2016. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2453

2. Hodges, Jonathan L. A Model of the Diurnal Variation in Lake Surface Temperature.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2014, Clemson University

Satellite measurements of water surface temperature can benefit several environmental ap-plications such as predictions of lake evaporation, meteorological forecasts, and predictions of lake overturning events, among others. However, limitations on the temporal resolution of satellite mea-surements restrict these improvements. A model of the diurnal variation in lake surface temperature could potentially increase the effective temporal resolution of satellite measurements of surface tem-perature, thereby enhancing the utility of these measurements in the above applications. Herein, a one-dimensional transient thermal model of a lake is used in combination with surface tempera-ture measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard the Aqua and Terra satellites, along with ambient atmospheric conditions from local weather stations, and bulk temperature measurements to calculate the diurnal surface temperature variation for the five major lakes in the Savannah River Basin in South Carolina: Lakes Jocassee, Keowee, Hartwell, Russell, and Thurmond. The calculated solutions are used to obtain a functional form for the diurnal surface temperature variation of these lakes. Differences in diurnal variation in surface temperature between each of these lakes are identified and potential explanations for these differences are presented. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. John R. Saylor, Dr. Nigel B. Kaye, Dr. Richard Miller.

Subjects/Keywords: Mechanical Engineering

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hodges, J. L. (2014). A Model of the Diurnal Variation in Lake Surface Temperature. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2075

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hodges, Jonathan L. “A Model of the Diurnal Variation in Lake Surface Temperature.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed January 24, 2021. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2075.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hodges, Jonathan L. “A Model of the Diurnal Variation in Lake Surface Temperature.” 2014. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Hodges JL. A Model of the Diurnal Variation in Lake Surface Temperature. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2075.

Council of Science Editors:

Hodges JL. A Model of the Diurnal Variation in Lake Surface Temperature. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2014. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2075

3. Fredericks, Steven. Investigation of single drop particle scavenging using an ultrasonically levitated drop.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2018, Clemson University

Airborne particulate, known as aerosols, produced by both natural and anthropogenic means, have significant health and environmental impacts. Therefore understanding the produc-tion and removal of these particles is of critical importance. The main thrust of this thesis research is concerned with improving the understanding of removal of particulates via interaction with falling liquid drops, known as wet deposition. This process occurs naturally within rain and can be imposed in industrial applications with wet scrubbers. Therefore improved models for wet scavenging have applications in both climatology and pollution control. To perform this study, first the performance of existing models for wet deposition was investigated. Models for drop scavenging of aerosols via inertial impaction proposed by Slinn and by Calvert were compared with published experimental measurements. A parametric study was performed on the residual of the model predictions from the measurements to identify dimensionless groups not included in these models, which might increase model performance. The study found that two dimensionless groups, the relative Stokes number, Stkr and the drop Reynolds number Re, are both well correlated with the residual of these models. They are included in modified versions of both of these models to provide better performance. That these two dimensionless groups improve model performance suggests that an inertial mechanism and an advective mechanism not accounted for in the existing models play some role in aerosol scavenging in the inertial regime. These findings were experimentally investigated to identify more specifically these mecha-nisms. To do this, single drop particle scavenging was experimentally measured using an ultrasonic levitation technique. This technique enabled measurements of scavenging efficiency, E, for individ-ual drops, and allowed for control of drop axis ratio, α, drop shape oscillations, and Re independently from drop diameter. This allowed for more controlled manipulation of the drop wakes in both at-tached and vortex shedding regimes. Non-evaporating drops were used which resulted in essentially zero temperature and vapor concentration difference between the drop surface and the surrounding air, virtually eliminating the possibility of confounding phoretic effects. Plots of E versus Stokes number, Stk, were found to depend on α. These plots became independent of α when Stk was calculated using the Sauter mean diameter (as opposed to the equivolume diameter). Furthermore, E was shown to be insensitive to both Re and drop shape oscillations, suggesting that wake effects do not have a measurable impact on E. Finally, a method was developed to relate models of E for spherical drops (the assumed shape in existing scavenging model predictions) to E for arbitrarily deformed drops, such as those occurring in rain. Of note, these are the first measurements of droplet scavenging obtained using ultrasonic levitation. Finally, as drop scavenging is heavily dependent on particle size, a… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. John R. Saylor, Committee Chair, Dr. Joshua B. Bostwick, Dr. Rodrigo Martinez-Duarte, Dr. Lonny L. Thompson.

Subjects/Keywords: Aerosol Scavenging; Drop Oscillation; Drop Shape; Drop Wake; Ultrasonic Levitation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fredericks, S. (2018). Investigation of single drop particle scavenging using an ultrasonically levitated drop. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2149

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fredericks, Steven. “Investigation of single drop particle scavenging using an ultrasonically levitated drop.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed January 24, 2021. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2149.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fredericks, Steven. “Investigation of single drop particle scavenging using an ultrasonically levitated drop.” 2018. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Fredericks S. Investigation of single drop particle scavenging using an ultrasonically levitated drop. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2149.

Council of Science Editors:

Fredericks S. Investigation of single drop particle scavenging using an ultrasonically levitated drop. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2018. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2149

.