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You searched for +publisher:"Clemson University" +contributor:("Dr. John Hains"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Clemson University

1. Mhatre, Snehal Subhash. Water-Electricity Nexus: Assessing Impacts of Habitat Loss on Freshwater Mussel Assemblages in the Savannah Basin, South Carolina.

Degree: PhD, Biological Sciences, 2018, Clemson University

The environmental effects of energy production are well known, yet its exact impacts on freshwater resources are often difficult to recognize and measure. Freshwater mussels are extremely imperiled organisms which act as sentinels of freshwater streams and are greatly understudied in context of their drastic decline caused in part due to large water demands by the energy sector. I sought to estimate historic, current and forecasted water use by electricity generation at national, regional and local- scale. To relate the impacts of water-use by electricity generation on freshwater mussels, I conducted occupancy surveys for eight freshwater mussel species in Savannah River Basin, South Carolina. I modeled landscape and local factors potentially influencing occupancy and assessed whether the occupancy of species indicated vulnerability to the presence of impoundments. I also modeled the viability of the endangered Carolina heelsplitter (Lasmigona decorata) metapopulation in response to habitat loss caused by water appropriation associated with the energy sector. The results suggest that water-use is projected to increase in the future irrespective of clean energy policies and variety of energy mix. The water consumption is predicted to increase at a local scale and the water withdrawals will vary spatially and temporally. The site occupancy varied with species and was significantly correlated with local habitat factors such as stream width and substrate heterogeneity and landscape driven factors such as % forest and presence of impoundment. The Carolina heelsplitter metapopulation exhibited a gradual decline in response to both habitat degradation and fragmentation for both effective population sizes, but the effect was more significant at lower population sizes. The findings of this dissertation suggest that mussel assemblages in the Savannah river basin are more likely to benefit from habitat restoration than the removal of dispersal barriers and management efforts for threatened mussel species should prioritize habitat protection and restoration. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Alan R. Johnson, Committee Chair, Dr. Kyle Barrett, Dr. John Hains, Dr. John Rodgers, Jr..

Subjects/Keywords: freshwater mussels; occupancy models; population viability analysis; water-electricity nexus

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mhatre, S. S. (2018). Water-Electricity Nexus: Assessing Impacts of Habitat Loss on Freshwater Mussel Assemblages in the Savannah Basin, South Carolina. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2120

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mhatre, Snehal Subhash. “Water-Electricity Nexus: Assessing Impacts of Habitat Loss on Freshwater Mussel Assemblages in the Savannah Basin, South Carolina.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed October 20, 2019. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2120.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mhatre, Snehal Subhash. “Water-Electricity Nexus: Assessing Impacts of Habitat Loss on Freshwater Mussel Assemblages in the Savannah Basin, South Carolina.” 2018. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Mhatre SS. Water-Electricity Nexus: Assessing Impacts of Habitat Loss on Freshwater Mussel Assemblages in the Savannah Basin, South Carolina. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2120.

Council of Science Editors:

Mhatre SS. Water-Electricity Nexus: Assessing Impacts of Habitat Loss on Freshwater Mussel Assemblages in the Savannah Basin, South Carolina. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2018. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2120

2. Zoellner, Danielle C. Consequences of Fragment for Woody Plant Communities: A Study of Reservoir Islands.

Degree: PhD, Biological Sciences, 2016, Clemson University

Forest fragmentation has been overwhelmingly cited as a major threat to the biodiversity and conservation of forested plant communities worldwide. Here I take a community- and species-specific approach to examine how species richness and composition respond to forest fragmentation. I conducted this research on a series of 35 small forested islands that were fragments of continuous forest created by impoundment of the Savannah River in the Southeastern Piedmont of the United States. I paired the islands with 10 mainland forest sites representing large remnant forest with only a single edge exposed along two reservoirs. Species richness was positively related to island area, as predicted by the species-area relationship, and islands in general had greater species richness than mainland sites because of an addition of liana and shrub species uncommon to oak-hickory forests. Due to the increase of lianas, shrubs and pioneer trees in small forested fragments I detected large differences in the plant communities that have developed on these sites over the last 40 to 70 years. In addition, it appears that islands will continue to diverge from mainland forest over time, likely degrading to the point that the species of oak-hickory forest may disappear and convert entirely to disturbance-tolerant early seral communities. Moreover, these fragments had invasive plants species that were less common in the more intact forest. I used a seedling outplanting experiment to determine if two of the more common, non-native woody invaders are likely to invade intact forest interior sites. Indeed, the non-native woody liana, Lonicera japonica appears to have the ability to not only survive, but also thrive under interior forest. In contrast, Albizia julibrissin does not appear to be a major threat to forest interiors unless there is a large canopy disturbance that increases light to seedlings. Finally, I used this study system to test whether species richness estimators provide accurate estimates and should continue to be used to examine important ecological patterns. I found that all 10 of the ones examined were so imprecise that none of them detected the true species-area relationship found across the forest fragments. Use of species richness estimators, in place of true richness, should therefore be used with extreme caution if the goal is to describe patterns in species richness across a set of sites. Overall, my research highlights how much we still have yet to learn about generalities associated with forest fragmentation and species richness estimation techniques. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Saara J. DeWalt, Committee Chair, Dr. Bryan Brown, Dr. Donald Hagan, Dr. John Hains, Dr. David Tonkyn.

Subjects/Keywords: forest fragmentation; Albizia julibrissin; Lonicera japonica; oak-hickory forest; species richness estimation; woody plant community

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zoellner, D. C. (2016). Consequences of Fragment for Woody Plant Communities: A Study of Reservoir Islands. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1651

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zoellner, Danielle C. “Consequences of Fragment for Woody Plant Communities: A Study of Reservoir Islands.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed October 20, 2019. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1651.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zoellner, Danielle C. “Consequences of Fragment for Woody Plant Communities: A Study of Reservoir Islands.” 2016. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Zoellner DC. Consequences of Fragment for Woody Plant Communities: A Study of Reservoir Islands. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1651.

Council of Science Editors:

Zoellner DC. Consequences of Fragment for Woody Plant Communities: A Study of Reservoir Islands. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2016. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1651

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