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You searched for +publisher:"Clemson University" +contributor:("Dr. Jim Martin"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Clemson University

1. Agarwal, Udit. Cloud Abstraction Libraries: Implementation and Comparison.

Degree: MS, Computer Science, 2016, Clemson University

Vendor lock-in makes it difficult for an organization to port their services, application or data. Cloud providers are in race to provide the best-in-class storage, networking and compute resources. Many organizations are moving towards micro-services and cloud services architecture. It is very important for an infrastructure platform to offer a high-quality cloud computing environment consistently across multiple cloud platforms. To enable this, a collaborative yet an independent cloud abstraction service is required. The cloud abstraction library should support the basic use cases of delivery pipeline, service management, cloud operations and security service. Cloud interoperability standards helps to improve availability and scalability by providing cross organizational or vendor independent projects. An important aspect of cloud interoperability is development of standardized APIs to send and receive data, irrespective of the underlying cloud implementation. Cloud interoperability helps application and data portability between public clouds and private clouds. This thesis explores the role of open source libraries to use cloud specific features. Our work is to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate Dasein cloud and jClouds against Amazon EC2 and Google Compute Engine. We believe that cloud standardization can be accelerated by implementations based on open source and open standards. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Amy Apon, Committee Chair, Dr. Jim Martin, Dr. Hongxin Hu.

Subjects/Keywords: Computer Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Agarwal, U. (2016). Cloud Abstraction Libraries: Implementation and Comparison. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2589

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Agarwal, Udit. “Cloud Abstraction Libraries: Implementation and Comparison.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed February 19, 2018. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2589.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Agarwal, Udit. “Cloud Abstraction Libraries: Implementation and Comparison.” 2016. Web. 19 Feb 2018.

Vancouver:

Agarwal U. Cloud Abstraction Libraries: Implementation and Comparison. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2016. [cited 2018 Feb 19]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2589.

Council of Science Editors:

Agarwal U. Cloud Abstraction Libraries: Implementation and Comparison. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2016. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2589

2. Izard, Ryan. Data Movement Challenges and Solutions with Software Defined Networking.

Degree: PhD, Computer Engineering, 2017, Clemson University

With the recent rise in cloud computing, applications are routinely accessing and interacting with data on remote resources. Interaction with such remote resources for the operation of media-rich applications in mobile environments is also on the rise. As a result, the performance of the underlying network infrastructure can have a significant impact on the quality of service experienced by the user. Despite receiving significant attention from both academia and industry, computer networks still face a number of challenges. Users oftentimes report and complain about poor experiences with their devices and applications, which can oftentimes be attributed to network performance when downloading or uploading application data. This dissertation investigates problems that arise with data movement across computer networks and proposes novel solutions to address these issues through software defined networking (SDN). SDN is lauded to be the paradigm of choice for next generation networks. While academia explores use cases in various contexts, industry has focused on data center and wide area networks. There is a significant range of complex and application-specific network services that can potentially benefit from SDN, but introduction and adoption of such solutions remains slow in production networks. One impeding factor is the lack of a simple yet expressive enough framework applicable to all SDN services across production network domains. Without a uniform framework, SDN developers create disjoint solutions, resulting in untenable management and maintenance overhead. The SDN-based solutions developed in this dissertation make use of a common agent-based approach. The architecture facilitates application-oriented SDN design with an abstraction composed of software agents on top of the underlying network. There are three key components modern and future networks require to deliver exceptional data transfer performance to the end user: (1) user and application mobility, (2) high throughput data transfer, and (3) efficient and scalable content distribution. Meeting these key components will not only ensure the network can provide robust and reliable end-to-end connectivity, but also that network resources will be used efficiently. First, mobility support is critical for user applications to maintain connectivity to remote, cloud-based resources. Today's network users are frequently accessing such resources while on the go, transitioning from network to network with the expectation that their applications will continue to operate seamlessly. As users perform handovers between heterogeneous networks or between networks across administrative domains, the application becomes responsible for maintaining or establishing new connections to remote resources. Although application developers often account for such handovers, the result is oftentimes visible to the user through diminished quality of service (e.g. rebuffering in video streaming applications). Many intra-domain handover solutions exist for handovers… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Kuang-Ching Wang, Committee Chair, Dr. Harlan Russell, Dr. Richard Brooks, Dr. Jim Martin.

Subjects/Keywords: data movement; network; openflow; software defined networking

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Izard, R. (2017). Data Movement Challenges and Solutions with Software Defined Networking. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1910

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Izard, Ryan. “Data Movement Challenges and Solutions with Software Defined Networking.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed February 19, 2018. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1910.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Izard, Ryan. “Data Movement Challenges and Solutions with Software Defined Networking.” 2017. Web. 19 Feb 2018.

Vancouver:

Izard R. Data Movement Challenges and Solutions with Software Defined Networking. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2017. [cited 2018 Feb 19]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1910.

Council of Science Editors:

Izard R. Data Movement Challenges and Solutions with Software Defined Networking. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2017. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1910

3. Posey, Brandon. Dynamic HPC Clusters within Amazon Web Services (AWS).

Degree: MS, Computer Science, 2016, Clemson University

Amazon Web Services (AWS) provides public cloud computing resources and services and is one of the largest cloud computing providers in the world. However, in order to get started using AWS, one must spend many hours overcoming the steep learning curve and terminology associated with AWS. This is especially true for researchers looking to create and utilize a High Performance Computing (HPC) cluster within AWS. This is due to the massive amount of AWS services and AWS resources that must be created and linked together in order to create a fully functional HPC cluster with AWS. The Dynamic AWS HPC Cluster Project aims to help simplify the steps needed to create a fully functional dynamic HPC cluster within AWS. The user simply completes a simple wizard that specifies the details of the HPC cluster that they want: the size and type of the shared filesystem, the type of HPC scheduler, the number of Compute Instances, what IP addresses they want the cluster to be accessible from, and the number of Login/Head Instances required. After all this has been specified, the Dynamic AWS HPC Cluster project makes the required calls to the AWS APIs in order to create all the required AWS resources. After the resources have been created, they are all automatically configured, networked together, and have the usernames and passwords pushed out to all of the cluster instances for SSH login. The user can then run their jobs and when they have no more jobs left to run they can "pause" the cluster, which means they do not pay for compute charges, and then when they have more jobs to run "resume" the cluster and run their jobs. This allows users to only pay for the cluster when they need it which can help save them money. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Amy Apon, Committee Chair, Dr. Brian Malloy, Dr. Jim Martin.

Subjects/Keywords: Amazon Web Services; Cloud Computing; HPC Clusters; Self-Configuration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Posey, B. (2016). Dynamic HPC Clusters within Amazon Web Services (AWS). (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2392

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Posey, Brandon. “Dynamic HPC Clusters within Amazon Web Services (AWS).” 2016. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed February 19, 2018. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2392.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Posey, Brandon. “Dynamic HPC Clusters within Amazon Web Services (AWS).” 2016. Web. 19 Feb 2018.

Vancouver:

Posey B. Dynamic HPC Clusters within Amazon Web Services (AWS). [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2016. [cited 2018 Feb 19]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2392.

Council of Science Editors:

Posey B. Dynamic HPC Clusters within Amazon Web Services (AWS). [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2016. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2392

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