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You searched for +publisher:"Clemson University" +contributor:("Dr. Jacquelynn Malloy"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Clemson University

1. Saleh, Aamena. Who am I? Refugee adolescents' transformation and negotiation of identities at the cultural borders.

Degree: PhD, Learning Sciences, 2018, Clemson University

Many gaps exist in the research on refugee students in general, with the overall portrayal in the literature presenting a school experience in which refugees struggle academically, socially, and emotionally (Roxas, 2008; McBrien, 2005; Lerner, 2012; Lustig, 2004; Smith & Halbert, 2013). Current research discusses social and linguistic struggles frequently, and highlights the need for schools to acknowledge refugees’ backgrounds and draw on their linguistic repertoires to aid their acquisition of the English language (Cummins, 2005; Cummins, et al., 2006; Gutierrez, Baquedano-Lopez, & Tejeda, 1999; Gutierrez, Baquedano-Lopez, Alvarez, & Chiu, 1999). Little has been done to uncover who refugees are as individuals, what literacy skills they possess, and their experiences navigating a new and unfamiliar culture and language. Developing and modifying programs aimed at helping refugee students succeed in school necessitates in-depth understanding of their experiences, their identities, and influences on identity negotiation. No research study has explored the experiences, literacies and identities of refugee students in-depth, and none has used Bhabha’s cultural hybridity theory as a lens to do so. This study explored the literacies, identities, and navigation of cultural borders of three refugee high school students in the Southeastern region of the United States. It aimed to answer the following research questions: How are these students literate? What identities do they enact as a result of their interaction with and negotiation of cultural borders? What use of hybridity is apparent in their experiences and in their current identities as individuals? And, how do these students use language as a tool to mediate identity? Using a case study design, qualitative data was collected during formal and informal interviews with all three boys over the course of one school semester. During this duration, observations were conducted of two of the boys in various contexts, where field notes were taken and analytical memos were recorded. Data was examined using Bhabha's cultural hybridity theory, as well as sociocultural understandings of literacy (Street, 2014; Wilder, 2015) and critical perspectives towards identity (Norton, 1997). Findings illuminated these boys' literacy skills, identities, and experiences at the cultural borders, including linguistic ones. In doing so, this study also opens up questions for further research focused on refugee students, their identities, and experiences. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Phillip M. Wilder, Committee Chair, Dr. Matthew Boyer, Dr. Mikel Cole, Dr. Jacquelynn Malloy.

Subjects/Keywords: Cultural Borders; Identity; Language; Literacy; Refugee; Students

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Saleh, A. (2018). Who am I? Refugee adolescents' transformation and negotiation of identities at the cultural borders. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2111

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Saleh, Aamena. “Who am I? Refugee adolescents' transformation and negotiation of identities at the cultural borders.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed October 21, 2019. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2111.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Saleh, Aamena. “Who am I? Refugee adolescents' transformation and negotiation of identities at the cultural borders.” 2018. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Saleh A. Who am I? Refugee adolescents' transformation and negotiation of identities at the cultural borders. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2111.

Council of Science Editors:

Saleh A. Who am I? Refugee adolescents' transformation and negotiation of identities at the cultural borders. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2018. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2111


Clemson University

2. McClure, Erin. Exploring the Nature of Teacher-Student Reading Conferences during Independent Reading Time.

Degree: PhD, Education and Organizational Leadership Development, 2017, Clemson University

In elementary classrooms, a variety of approaches and frameworks are used to support students as they develop their reading comprehension abilities and independently read increasingly complex texts. This multiple-case study embedded design described teacher-student reading conferences conducted in the context of independent reading time by four exemplary second grade teachers whose primary method of reading instruction is the reading workshop approach as described by Calkins (2001). This study described feedback and scaffolds provided by four exemplary reading workshop teachers during 207 teacher-student reading conferences within a nine-week period. In addition to investigating how four exemplary reading workshop teachers conducted teacher-student reading conferences, this study also described how twenty-four students responded to the teachers' feedback and scaffolds during the teacher-student reading conferences. Based on twelve 90 minute observations and the audio recordings of 207 teacher-student reading conferences, specific routines and resources the teachers used to support teacher-student reading conferences are described. Each teacher utilized their classrooms and resources in similar ways to support students reading self-selected texts during independent reading time. The use of student folders, which included resources and goal setting sheets, was critical in teacher-student reading conferences in three of the four classrooms. The four teachers utilized Teachers College Reading and Writing Project curriculum guides and resources to support their teacher-student reading conferences. The findings from the present study highlighted the multifaceted and complex nature of teacher-student reading conferences as they occurred during independent reading time. Even though the findings described differences in how the four second grade teachers structured their teacher-student reading conferences, each of the cases described the importance of knowing students and the reading process to flexibly provide feedback and scaffolds to meet the needs of readers during teacher-student reading conferences during independent reading time. The individual case studies revealed the teachers utilized a consistent structure for conducting their teacher-student reading conferences. However, the structure varied by teacher based on their stated purpose for teacher-student reading conferences within their instructional literacy time. One of the teachers expressed teacher-student reading conferences were a time for her to provide explicit, targeted instruction whereas another teacher viewed reading conferences as a time to informally assess how students were applying learning from whole-group literacy instruction. Throughout this study, the teachers' purpose for teacher-student reading conferences influenced the feedback and scaffolds they provided and, as a result, determined the way students responded during teacher-student reading conferences. Despite differences in implementation of teacher-student reading conferences… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Linda Gambrell, Committee Chair, Dr. Celeste Bates, Dr. Susan Fullerton, Dr. Jacquelynn Malloy.

Subjects/Keywords: Comprehension; Reading Conferences; Reading Workshop; Scaffolding

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McClure, E. (2017). Exploring the Nature of Teacher-Student Reading Conferences during Independent Reading Time. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2002

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McClure, Erin. “Exploring the Nature of Teacher-Student Reading Conferences during Independent Reading Time.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed October 21, 2019. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2002.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McClure, Erin. “Exploring the Nature of Teacher-Student Reading Conferences during Independent Reading Time.” 2017. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

McClure E. Exploring the Nature of Teacher-Student Reading Conferences during Independent Reading Time. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2002.

Council of Science Editors:

McClure E. Exploring the Nature of Teacher-Student Reading Conferences during Independent Reading Time. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2017. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2002

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