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You searched for +publisher:"Clemson University" +contributor:("Dr. George Chumanov, Committee Chair"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Clemson University

1. Voyton, Charles. Novel Methods for Monitoring Glucose Metabolism in <i>Trypanosoma brucei</i> Using Fluorescent Biosensors.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry, 2018, Clemson University

Members of the class Kinetoplastea including Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp. cause diseases endemic in rural regions of South America, Sub‐Saharan African and the Eastern Asian continent, effecting hundreds of millions of people and livestock. Existing treatments are associated with high toxicity and rates of resistance, are expensive to produce, and are difficult to administer in rural areas. To develop additional treatment strategies, we must better illuminate the pathways amenable for anti kinetoplastid treatments. One pathway susceptible to drug intervention is glucose metabolism, which in kinetoplasts takes place in glycosomes that are specialized organelles related to mammalian peroxisomes. Disruption of glycosome function is hypothesized to lead to cell death in the pathological bloodstream form of T. brucei as they obtain all cellular ATP via glycosome metabolism. To explore glucose import, and consumption mechanisms in T. brucei we deployed a series of recombinant fluorescent protein biosensors that specifically detect glucose moieties. Biosensors were expressed in T. brucei, and targeted to the cytosol or glycosomes allowing for real time monitoring of intracellular and intraglycosomal glucose concentrations. Using flow cytometry to monitor changes in sensor fluorescence, bloodstream form T. brucei cytosolic and glycosomal glucose were measured as 1.9 ±0.6 mM and 3.5 ± 0.5 mM respectively in response to glucose levels similar to blood (~5mM). Higher glycosomal glucose versus the surrounding cytosol suggests active transport of glucose across the glycosomal membrane, a process that was assumed to occur via passive transport. Monitoring biosensor response in trypanosomes accurately via microscopy is very difficult due to high motility and flagellar undulation. To monitor dynamics in intracellular biosensor response we adapted a microfluidic device which mechanically traps parasites, allowing for continuous imaging of cells under constant perfusion conditions. We found that single trypanosome glucose responses were consistent with bulk glucose measurements, cells also responded in a dose dependent manner when perfused against different glucose concentrations. Microfluidic trapping of T. brucei allows continuous imaging of single cellular dynamics which were previously not possible to image. To identify small molecules that inhibit glucose uptake into parasites we adapted a high throughput screening assay utilizing the fluorescent glucose sensor as a score of glucose uptake inhibition. A pilot screen of 400 compounds identified two novel compounds that inhibit glucose uptake in trypanosome parasites with EC50s of 700nM and 5000nM respectively, one compound exhibited good killing (IC50 5uM) against infectious form parasites. To build upon the success of the pilot screen, 25,000 compounds were analyzed, from this library 57 compounds… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. George Chumanov, Committee Chair, Dr. Kenneth Christensen, Dr. James Morris, Dr. Daniel Whitehead.

Subjects/Keywords: drug screening; flow cytometry; Fluorescent sensor; genetic biosensor; microfluidics; Trypanosoma brucei

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APA (6th Edition):

Voyton, C. (2018). Novel Methods for Monitoring Glucose Metabolism in <i>Trypanosoma brucei</i> Using Fluorescent Biosensors. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2099

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Voyton, Charles. “Novel Methods for Monitoring Glucose Metabolism in <i>Trypanosoma brucei</i> Using Fluorescent Biosensors.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed November 26, 2020. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2099.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Voyton, Charles. “Novel Methods for Monitoring Glucose Metabolism in <i>Trypanosoma brucei</i> Using Fluorescent Biosensors.” 2018. Web. 26 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Voyton C. Novel Methods for Monitoring Glucose Metabolism in <i>Trypanosoma brucei</i> Using Fluorescent Biosensors. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2018. [cited 2020 Nov 26]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2099.

Council of Science Editors:

Voyton C. Novel Methods for Monitoring Glucose Metabolism in <i>Trypanosoma brucei</i> Using Fluorescent Biosensors. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2018. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2099


Clemson University

2. Wen, Yimei. Synthesis, Application and Protein Nanomaterial Interactions of Selected Nanofiber, Nanoparticle and Nanoarray.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry, 2017, Clemson University

Nanomaterials have been a hot research topic for past decades due to their unique optical, electronic, catalytic and mechanical properties. This dissertation aims to investigate selected aspects of nanomaterial synthesis, application and protein nanomaterial interactions. We target to improve nanomaterials synthesis, explore their novel applications and study their potential hazardous. Chapter 1 describes new hydrothermal synthesis of carbon nanofibers from cellulose nanocrystals. The described hydrothermal synthesis from cellulose is an environmentally friendly method that has commercial potential for inexpensive production of carbon nanofibers. Chapter 2 describes the application of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) stabilized 2D AgNP array for measuring changes of bulk refractive index and sensing of selected volatile organic compound (VOC). The PMMA stabilized 2D AgNP array gives linear response to bulk refractive index changes and can be re-used after rinsing with water. Responsive polymer films were spin-coated on PMMA stabilized 2D AgNP array to fabricate the nanocomposite films. These nanocomposite films exhibit sharp coherent plasmon coupling, spectra position of which is affected by the changes of local dielectric environment when interacting with VOC vapors. Chapter 3 describes studies related to the interaction of AgNP and AuNP with cytoskeleton protein (actin and tubulin), immune system protein (complementary component 3) and plasma protein (albumin and fibronegen). The nanoparticle protein interaction is influenced by both nanoparticle and protein sizes. The work presented here establishes basic knowledge related to nanomaterial synthesis and their advanced applications. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. George Chumanov, Committee Chair, Dr. R. Kenneth Marcus, Dr. Jeffrey N. Anker, Dr. William T. Pennington.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wen, Y. (2017). Synthesis, Application and Protein Nanomaterial Interactions of Selected Nanofiber, Nanoparticle and Nanoarray. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2042

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wen, Yimei. “Synthesis, Application and Protein Nanomaterial Interactions of Selected Nanofiber, Nanoparticle and Nanoarray.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed November 26, 2020. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2042.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wen, Yimei. “Synthesis, Application and Protein Nanomaterial Interactions of Selected Nanofiber, Nanoparticle and Nanoarray.” 2017. Web. 26 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Wen Y. Synthesis, Application and Protein Nanomaterial Interactions of Selected Nanofiber, Nanoparticle and Nanoarray. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2017. [cited 2020 Nov 26]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2042.

Council of Science Editors:

Wen Y. Synthesis, Application and Protein Nanomaterial Interactions of Selected Nanofiber, Nanoparticle and Nanoarray. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2017. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2042

3. Estepp, Dallas Ann Roe. Modification of Silver Nanoparticles in Homogeneous Solutions.

Degree: MS, Chemistry, 2017, Clemson University

Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are used for many analytical and imaging techniques because they represent the most efficient mechanism by which light interacts with matter. The stability of AgNPs remains an important factor for their application. Due to their tendency to aggregate, methods for stabilizing AgNPs, mainly the addition of surfactants, have been developed. Surfactants can prevent agglomeration of AgNPs, however they can inhibit further surface modification of the particles. To overcome this problem, AgNPs were synthesized in the presence of Na2SiO3, yielding a silica shell that substantially improved the particles' stability without compromising their surface chemistry. Potential benefits are described in chapter 1. Details of this method allowing controlled thickness of a silica shell via ethanol precipitation are presented in chapter 2. These silica shells can act as a scaffold for further surface modification as well as allow the synthesis of asymmetric structures. To prove the concept of the asymmetric structure synthesis, silver dimers were synthesized by impregnating the silica shell with silver ions. Uniform dimers were made via a homogeneous solution reaction. The method is expected to find general applicability for synthesizing various oligomeric nanostructures. In chapter 4, shape change via partial dissolution of crystalline AgNPs in aqueous suspension are discussed. The dissolution of particles yielded more rounded crystals contain many small facets which are more reactivity than the large facets of the initial crystalline state. This finding opened the possibility for producing more reactive nanoparticles. That can find applications such as Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering as well as catalysis are expected to be improved upon using this more reactive crystalline form of AgNP. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. George Chumanov, Committee Chair, Dr. R Kenneth Marcus, Dr. Carlos D. Garcia.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Estepp, D. A. R. (2017). Modification of Silver Nanoparticles in Homogeneous Solutions. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2747

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Estepp, Dallas Ann Roe. “Modification of Silver Nanoparticles in Homogeneous Solutions.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed November 26, 2020. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2747.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Estepp, Dallas Ann Roe. “Modification of Silver Nanoparticles in Homogeneous Solutions.” 2017. Web. 26 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Estepp DAR. Modification of Silver Nanoparticles in Homogeneous Solutions. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2017. [cited 2020 Nov 26]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2747.

Council of Science Editors:

Estepp DAR. Modification of Silver Nanoparticles in Homogeneous Solutions. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2017. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2747

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