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You searched for +publisher:"Clemson University" +contributor:("Dr. Brandon Ross, Committee Co-chair"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Clemson University

1. Manoharan, Sandeep. Determination of Safe Ballasts for Anchoring Event Tents by Finite Element Analysis.

Degree: MS, Civil Engineering, 2017, Clemson University

Event tents are large structures made of fabric covers attached to a structural frame and poles. Every year, many temporarily installed tents are subjected to large wind conditions that lead to sliding or lift of the frame due to improper anchoring to the ground. When ballasted, as opposed to anchored using stakes that penetrate the ground, non-certified tents are generally installed without proper analysis of sufficient ballast weights, which results into tent movements and lack of safety. The objective of this thesis is to determine load factors for non-certified tents affected by high wind loads. The load requirements (load factors) are determined for typical frame tents to provide ballasting guidelines to tent installers. . A Design of Experiments (DOE) simulation for calculating the responses of different tent configurations under different loading scenarios is developed and conducted. The parameters included in the analysis that defines the size and shape of the tents include: height, width, roof height, roof slope, bay width and wind orientation. The loading scenarios include wind loads from different directions with different intensities prescribed by code. A parameterized finite element model allows to determine the tension forces applied to the attachments points to prevent lift-off and sliding. These forces are then used to determine the safe weight of the ballasts used by installers based on the type of ballast, such as plastic water barrels, steel drum, and concrete blocks, and the type of ground surface, such as asphalt, smooth and rough concrete, grass, dirt, and gravel. These different sets of conditions for any given ballasting configuration are defined by the known friction coefficient between surfaces. The developed guidelines are intended to be made available to tent installers who will then have more confidence in the safety of any tent installation. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Vincent Blouin, Committee Co-chair, Dr. Brandon Ross, Committee Co-chair, Dr. Weichiang Pang.

Subjects/Keywords: Civil Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Manoharan, S. (2017). Determination of Safe Ballasts for Anchoring Event Tents by Finite Element Analysis. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2805

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Manoharan, Sandeep. “Determination of Safe Ballasts for Anchoring Event Tents by Finite Element Analysis.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed November 24, 2020. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2805.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Manoharan, Sandeep. “Determination of Safe Ballasts for Anchoring Event Tents by Finite Element Analysis.” 2017. Web. 24 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Manoharan S. Determination of Safe Ballasts for Anchoring Event Tents by Finite Element Analysis. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2017. [cited 2020 Nov 24]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2805.

Council of Science Editors:

Manoharan S. Determination of Safe Ballasts for Anchoring Event Tents by Finite Element Analysis. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2017. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2805


Clemson University

2. Chen, Diana Ann. The Adaptable Growth of Seashells: Informing the Design of the Built Environment through Quantitative Biomimicry.

Degree: PhD, Civil Engineering, 2016, Clemson University

Our current design philosophy in the creation and planning of our country’s infrastructure exudes an attitude of nonchalance that is incongruous with the significant impact the built infrastructure has on the natural environment. We are living through an era of obsolescence, in which structures are demolished thoughtlessly as they outgrow their ability to meet human demands. Obsolescence can be viewed as a “hazard” in the sense that this phenomenon is leaving swaths of buildings in unusable and undesirable conditions, lessening the quality of host locales, and polluting the environment with demolitions and the need for more construction resources. Designing our buildings to be adaptable to changing needs, rather than sufficient for predicted loads and functions, may help mitigate the amount of unnecessary demolitions. However, designing adaptably is not something we know how to do well; luckily, Nature has billions of years of experience that we can turn to. Biomimicry is a design approach that emulates Nature’s time-tested patterns and strategies for sustainable solutions to human challenges. While biomimicry has been used in many fields, applications in the built environment at the structures scale are scarce. Moreover, the examples that we do see are largely concerning thermal regulation. Even more troubling is how the popularization of biomimicry has led to frequent and misleading claims that qualitative, conceptual inspiration is inherently sustainable, given mere references of Nature. This project pairs infra/structural problems with natural solutions to bring these issues to attention in the civil engineering discipline. The spiraled shell of the Turritella terebra, a marine snail, is studied in this research to provide engineers with an example of how to use biomimicry in a comprehensive way. The spiraled gastropod shell demonstrates a simple form of adaptable growth, in which it is able to change its form through time to meet increases in its own performance demands. This project discusses how the snail’s environmental conditions influence its evolutionary traits through one of Nature’s principles (form follows function). The shell is mathematically characterized and structurally modeled to identify the functional roots responsible for its interesting resulting form. By pinpointing the emergent properties leading to adaptable growth, we create an opportunity to extract fundamental lessons of adaptability for application to the built environment. Shell samples of the T. terebra are experimentally tested with a structural engineering lens, and a finite element (FE) model of the shell is validated with these results. The FE model is then used to study parametric effects of ecological constraints—such as drag on the shell, fracture due to predators, and living space—to identify how adjustments to Nature’s design compare to reality. Many interesting findings about shell growth are discussed; however, comparisons to human structures are generalized into three main notions. The shell optimizes living convenience as… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Brandon Ross, Committee Co-Chair, Dr. Leidy Klotz, Committee Co-Chair, Dr. Qiushi Chen, Dr. Michael Carlos Barrios Kleiss.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chen, D. A. (2016). The Adaptable Growth of Seashells: Informing the Design of the Built Environment through Quantitative Biomimicry. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1740

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chen, Diana Ann. “The Adaptable Growth of Seashells: Informing the Design of the Built Environment through Quantitative Biomimicry.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed November 24, 2020. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1740.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chen, Diana Ann. “The Adaptable Growth of Seashells: Informing the Design of the Built Environment through Quantitative Biomimicry.” 2016. Web. 24 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Chen DA. The Adaptable Growth of Seashells: Informing the Design of the Built Environment through Quantitative Biomimicry. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 24]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1740.

Council of Science Editors:

Chen DA. The Adaptable Growth of Seashells: Informing the Design of the Built Environment through Quantitative Biomimicry. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2016. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1740

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