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You searched for +publisher:"Clemson University" +contributor:("Dr. Beth Ross"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Clemson University

1. Knoerr, Michael Donald. Hatch Success and Population Modeling for the Critically Endangered Bog Turtle in North Carolina.

Degree: MS, Forestry and Environmental Conservation, 2018, Clemson University

Recent literature suggests that several North Carolina bog turtle (<i>Glyptemys muhlenbergii</i>) populations are in decline, and many of these populations have few remaining individuals with low annual survival probability. Most populations appear dominated by older adults with few juveniles encountered; however, the proportion of juveniles encountered at two populations is dramatically higher. The reason for this variability is unknown. We conducted a nest monitoring study in 2016 and 2017 to test the hypothesis that nest survival patterns explain the observed population age structure. We collected the largest dataset yet compiled on the fate of naturally-incubated bog turtle eggs as well as the first study of its kind in North Carolina. Predation was the primary driver of nest failure across all sites. Populations with more juvenile encounters had substantially higher egg survival. These observations support the hypothesis that variation in egg survival may be linked to observed variation in recruitment patterns. We subsequently incorporated site-specific population parameters, including site-specific egg survival, into a stage-based matrix model to estimate population growth rates and to assess potential management scenarios for five bog turtle populations. Only two of the five populations modeled were stable or growing under current vital rates. Our results demonstrated that management scenarios targeting increased recruitment (especially a head-start scenario) may substantially contribute to some populations reaching stability. Population growth rates will likely be higher when recruitment augmentation coincides with wetland restoration efforts that increase survival and site fidelity at other life stages. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Kyle Barrett, Committee Chair, Dr. Beth Ross, Dr. Cathy Jachowski.

Subjects/Keywords: Bog Turtle; Demography; Glyptemys muhlenbergii; Matrix Model; Nest Survival; Population growth

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Knoerr, M. D. (2018). Hatch Success and Population Modeling for the Critically Endangered Bog Turtle in North Carolina. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2930

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Knoerr, Michael Donald. “Hatch Success and Population Modeling for the Critically Endangered Bog Turtle in North Carolina.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed February 19, 2019. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2930.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Knoerr, Michael Donald. “Hatch Success and Population Modeling for the Critically Endangered Bog Turtle in North Carolina.” 2018. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Knoerr MD. Hatch Success and Population Modeling for the Critically Endangered Bog Turtle in North Carolina. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2018. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2930.

Council of Science Editors:

Knoerr MD. Hatch Success and Population Modeling for the Critically Endangered Bog Turtle in North Carolina. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2018. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2930


Clemson University

2. Thomas, April L. Estimating Animal Abundance by Employing an External Experiment to Account for Detection and Count Bias with an application to Wintering Ducks in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley.

Degree: PhD, Mathematical Sciences, 2018, Clemson University

A valid concern when structuring an aerial survey of wildlife populations is the presence of visibility bias. Many studies attempt to correct for visibility bias by including additional parameters in estimators for wildlife abundance. Often these parameters are estimated through data collected during the aerial survey. Some, how-ever, have suggested using an external visibility experiment to estimate parameters being used to adjust for visibility bias. This work considers a bias adjusted estimator, proposed by Pearse et al. (2008), in which the bias correction parameters are esti-mated via an external visibility experiment using decoys in place of the live animals. The bootstrap method was then used to find the standard error of this estimate. We propose a second bootstrap approach to obtain an estimate of the standard error. We find that both implementations of the bootstrap work equally well, although the computations involved may dictate the most feasible choice in a specific case. We then evaluate the performance of the estimator through the use of a simulation study of an artificial population. We find that the use of an external experiment can pro-duce reasonable results and identify some situations where it can produce under or over estimates of the population. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Patrick Gerard, Committee Co-Chair, Dr. Brook Russell, Committee Co-Chair, Dr. William Bridges, Dr. Jun Luo, Dr. Beth Ross.

Subjects/Keywords: Bootstrap; External Experiment; Visibility Bias

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Thomas, A. L. (2018). Estimating Animal Abundance by Employing an External Experiment to Account for Detection and Count Bias with an application to Wintering Ducks in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2101

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Thomas, April L. “Estimating Animal Abundance by Employing an External Experiment to Account for Detection and Count Bias with an application to Wintering Ducks in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed February 19, 2019. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2101.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Thomas, April L. “Estimating Animal Abundance by Employing an External Experiment to Account for Detection and Count Bias with an application to Wintering Ducks in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley.” 2018. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Thomas AL. Estimating Animal Abundance by Employing an External Experiment to Account for Detection and Count Bias with an application to Wintering Ducks in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2018. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2101.

Council of Science Editors:

Thomas AL. Estimating Animal Abundance by Employing an External Experiment to Account for Detection and Count Bias with an application to Wintering Ducks in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2018. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2101

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