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You searched for +publisher:"Central Washington University" +contributor:("Dr. Elizabeth Haviland"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. rundlett, sara. Just World Beliefs, Identity Development, and Social Justice Advocacy of Counselor Trainees.

Degree: MS, Mental Health Counseling, 2017, Central Washington University

This was the first study exploring the relationship between the belief in a just world, identity development, and social justice advocacy (SJA). A mixed methods design was conducted using a nationwide sample of ninety-seven counselor-in-training participants. Hypotheses included positive correlation between identity development and SJA, negative correlation between belief in a just world and SJA, and negative correlation between belief in a just world and identity development. Results were not significant but provided implications for future research and counselor training programs. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Meaghan Nolte, Dr. Susan Lonborg, Dr. Elizabeth Haviland.

Subjects/Keywords: intersectionality; identity politics; LGBTQIA; people ofcolor; counselor training; Counseling Psychology; Counselor Education; Curriculum and Instruction; Developmental Psychology; Gender and Sexuality; Inequality and Stratification; Multicultural Psychology; Personality and Social Contexts; Politics and Social Change; Psychological Phenomena and Processes; Scholarship of Teaching and Learning; Social and Philosophical Foundations of Education; Transpersonal Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

rundlett, s. (2017). Just World Beliefs, Identity Development, and Social Justice Advocacy of Counselor Trainees. (Masters Thesis). Central Washington University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/etd/785

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

rundlett, sara. “Just World Beliefs, Identity Development, and Social Justice Advocacy of Counselor Trainees.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Central Washington University. Accessed February 21, 2019. https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/etd/785.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

rundlett, sara. “Just World Beliefs, Identity Development, and Social Justice Advocacy of Counselor Trainees.” 2017. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

rundlett s. Just World Beliefs, Identity Development, and Social Justice Advocacy of Counselor Trainees. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Central Washington University; 2017. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/etd/785.

Council of Science Editors:

rundlett s. Just World Beliefs, Identity Development, and Social Justice Advocacy of Counselor Trainees. [Masters Thesis]. Central Washington University; 2017. Available from: https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/etd/785

2. Graham, Sarah J. Counseling and Creativity: An Analog Study.

Degree: MS, Mental Health Counseling, 2017, Central Washington University

Researchers recognize that creativity can play a significant role in counseling, both on the part of the counselor and the client. Additionally, creativity is a potentially important and overlooked area when it comes to counselor education. However, the full nature and impact of creativity in counseling is not fully understood. To examine the relationship between creativity and counseling in further detail, this study exposed participants to an analog counseling video of either a low or high creativity level displayed by the counselor. Participants were then asked to take a survey rating dimensions of the counselor's efficacy (i.e., expertness, attractiveness, trustworthiness) and creativity. They also completed two measures of their own creative ideation. Multiple linear regression equations were used to predict the dimensions of counselor efficacy from video type (low or high creativity) and participants’ creativity scores. Although there was no direct significant support for the hypothesis that the intervention of counseling creativity level would be associated with ratings of counselor efficacy, there were significant results indicating that participants’ creativity levels were associated with their perceptions of the counselor. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Susan Lonborg, Dr. Meaghan Nolte, Dr. Elizabeth Haviland.

Subjects/Keywords: Counseling; Creativity; Analog; Counseling

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APA (6th Edition):

Graham, S. J. (2017). Counseling and Creativity: An Analog Study. (Masters Thesis). Central Washington University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/etd/913

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Graham, Sarah J. “Counseling and Creativity: An Analog Study.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Central Washington University. Accessed February 21, 2019. https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/etd/913.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Graham, Sarah J. “Counseling and Creativity: An Analog Study.” 2017. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Graham SJ. Counseling and Creativity: An Analog Study. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Central Washington University; 2017. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/etd/913.

Council of Science Editors:

Graham SJ. Counseling and Creativity: An Analog Study. [Masters Thesis]. Central Washington University; 2017. Available from: https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/etd/913

3. Moore, Dorothy. Criminological Self-Efficacy: Increased or Hindered From Crime TV Shows.

Degree: MS, Mental Health Counseling, 2018, Central Washington University

There is an age-old question that surrounds whether or not media have an effect on its viewers. There is substantial evidence that supports the claim that violent content in media may increase relational, physical, and/or overall aggression levels. The aim of the current study is to explore the relationship between several factors that may be related to one’s belief in one’s ability (self-efficacy) to commit and get away with murder. These factors are the amount of crime TV a person watches, aggressive tendency, recklessness tendency, and potential protective factors. It is hypothesized that the more crime TV watched, the higher aggressive and recklessness tendencies and fewer protective factors, the higher their self-efficacy will be in committing and getting away with murder. The data were analyzed using multiple linear regression with amount of crime TV watched, their basic aggression level, recklessness tendencies and potential protective factors as predictors of their belief in their self-efficacy to commit and get away with murder. The results showed that the only significant predictor was amount of crime TV watched in a week, meaning people who report higher amounts of crime TV per week have higher self-efficacy scores in committing and getting away with murder. The implications of this result will be discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Marte Fallshore, Dr. Elizabeth Haviland, Dr. Jeffrey Penick.

Subjects/Keywords: Crime TV; Self-Efficacy; TV Show impacts; Criminal Law; Other Mental and Social Health; Other Psychology; Personality and Social Contexts

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Moore, D. (2018). Criminological Self-Efficacy: Increased or Hindered From Crime TV Shows. (Masters Thesis). Central Washington University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/etd/934

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moore, Dorothy. “Criminological Self-Efficacy: Increased or Hindered From Crime TV Shows.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Central Washington University. Accessed February 21, 2019. https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/etd/934.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moore, Dorothy. “Criminological Self-Efficacy: Increased or Hindered From Crime TV Shows.” 2018. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Moore D. Criminological Self-Efficacy: Increased or Hindered From Crime TV Shows. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Central Washington University; 2018. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/etd/934.

Council of Science Editors:

Moore D. Criminological Self-Efficacy: Increased or Hindered From Crime TV Shows. [Masters Thesis]. Central Washington University; 2018. Available from: https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/etd/934

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