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You searched for +publisher:"Catholic U of America" +contributor:("Wagstaff, Grayson"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Wardenski, Ian Anthony. Harmonic and Phrase Rhythm Analysis of the Core Dance Movements from the Four Lute Suites of J.S. Bach.

Degree: PhD, Musicology, 2015, Catholic U of America

Harmonic and Phrase Rhythm Analysis of the Core Dance Movements from theFour Lute Suites of J.S. BachIan A. Wardenski, Ph.D.Andrew Simpson, D.M.Within the research of harmonic rhythm, there has been little work on the harmonic and phrase rhythm of Baroque dance music. When this topic is discussed, there is little in-depth treatment, and scholars typically compare the music to that of a later era. The lack of research on this repertory is unexpected, since scholars recognize, as William Rothstein wrote in 1989, that “hypermeter is most strongly in evidence in those pieces that are either intended for dancing or are meant to suggest the dance, because in dance the need for regularity is obvious.” Based on this statement, the core dance movements of Baroque suites are potentially good candidates for the discussion of phrase rhythm, with its hypermeter and hierarchical levels. Some movements of Baroque suites are built by means of motivic play – that is, the process of generating music through reiterating a motive by sequence or imitation – rather than by phrase groups. However, in these movements, the nature and organization of harmonic and phrase rhythm can still be investigated.My analysis of the core dance movements from J.S. Bach’s four lute suites will contribute to the discussion of Baroque dance music with regard to harmonic rhythm and phrase rhythm. This analysis will be done in the context of published analyses of other Bach works, with close attention to how theorists have handled other core dance movements from suites. Analyses of Bach suite movements by Cooper and Meyer, Lerdahl and Jackendoff, and Schachter will be consulted and in some cases used as models.Each movement common to more than one lute suite (allemande, courante, sarabande, and gigue) will be analyzed together. The analysis of the harmonic and phrase rhythm of the core dance movements in Bach’s four lute suites will employ reductive techniques to reveal structural and non-structural events and rhythmic organization. The movements of the dancers, as described by Little and Jenne, and by Mather, will also be examined for their potential influence on harmonic and phrase rhythm at hierarchical levels. The principal musical source will be the four lute suites from the Neue Bach-Ausgabe, Series V, Volume 10; the critical notes will be consulted for any variant readings that may affect the analysis.

Degree awarded: Ph.D. Musicology. The Catholic University of America

Advisors/Committee Members: Simpson, Andrew (Advisor), Baker, Robert (Other), Wagstaff, Grayson (Other).

Subjects/Keywords: Music; Harmonic; J.S. Bach; Lute; Phrase; Rhythm

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APA (6th Edition):

Wardenski, I. A. (2015). Harmonic and Phrase Rhythm Analysis of the Core Dance Movements from the Four Lute Suites of J.S. Bach. (Doctoral Dissertation). Catholic U of America. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:28316

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wardenski, Ian Anthony. “Harmonic and Phrase Rhythm Analysis of the Core Dance Movements from the Four Lute Suites of J.S. Bach.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Catholic U of America. Accessed July 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:28316.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wardenski, Ian Anthony. “Harmonic and Phrase Rhythm Analysis of the Core Dance Movements from the Four Lute Suites of J.S. Bach.” 2015. Web. 15 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Wardenski IA. Harmonic and Phrase Rhythm Analysis of the Core Dance Movements from the Four Lute Suites of J.S. Bach. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Catholic U of America; 2015. [cited 2019 Jul 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:28316.

Council of Science Editors:

Wardenski IA. Harmonic and Phrase Rhythm Analysis of the Core Dance Movements from the Four Lute Suites of J.S. Bach. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Catholic U of America; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:28316

2. Moses, Karen R. Nielsen, Hindemith and Schoenberg: Foundations of the Twentieth-Century Wind Quintet.

Degree: PhD, Musicology, 2015, Catholic U of America

This study focuses on a repertoire that established the twentieth-century wind quintet. This new genre is anchored on three canonic wind quintets written between 1922 and 1924: the Kvintet op. 43 of Carl Nielsen, Paul Hindemith's Kleine Kammermusik op. 24, no 2, and the Bläserquintett op. 26 by Arnold Schoenberg. Nielsen's score for the men in the Copenhagen Wind Quintet, confirmed in reminiscence by Svend Felumb, shows idiosyncratic instrumental and novel performer characterizations, as it expands instrumental range and timbre. His narrative and temporal program, with its anthropomorphic characterizations, opened a new world of rich color and expressive articulation. The Kleine Kammermusik demonstrates Hindemith's quest for a social and musical democracy with its melodic and textural teamwork. The quintet reveals new instrumental timbres, an expanded emotional range, novel textural combinations, and instrumental virtuosity based on strong motoric movement. Schoenberg's op. 26 stands as a laboratory for his twelve-tone technique, and as the presentation piece for his new theoretical system. With its formidable technical demands and arduous instrumental interactions, Schoenberg magnified the conventional limits of early twentieth-century technique and facility, anticipating and telegraphing a new instrumental virtuosity for the future. Correspondence in the Arnold Schoenberg Collection, Library of Congress, between Schoenberg and Alban Berg, Anton Webern, Hindemith, Paul Hagemann, Paul von Klenau, Alexander von Zemlinsky, Felix Greissle, Rudolf Kolisch, and Hermann Scherchen, reveals little-known connections between the Kvintet, the Kleine Kammermusik, and Op. 26. Letters by Berg to his wife reveal the unexplored connection between Schoenberg's Op. 26 and Berg's Chamber Concerto, originally intended as a work for the Copenhagen Wind Quintet. Premieres, performances, and reviews from Danish, German, French, and American newspapers provide historical context and contemporary perceptions. Analysis reveals remarkable and unrecognized commonalities between Nielsen's and Hindemith's quintets, with that of Schoenberg's Op.26. Nielsen, Hindemith, and Schoenberg contributed to defining what is now recognized as one of the most important developments in the history of twentieth-century wind music – the renaissance of the wind quintet – as they raised and ennobled the genre, ensuring its continuation into the twenty-first century.

Degree awarded: Ph.D. Musicology. The Catholic University of America

Advisors/Committee Members: Weaver, Andrew H (Advisor), Wagstaff, Grayson (Other), Simpson, Andrew E (Other).

Subjects/Keywords: Music; Arnold Schoenberg; Carl Nielsen; Chamber Music; Paul Hindemith; Wind Quintet; Woodwind

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APA (6th Edition):

Moses, K. R. (2015). Nielsen, Hindemith and Schoenberg: Foundations of the Twentieth-Century Wind Quintet. (Doctoral Dissertation). Catholic U of America. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:28263

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moses, Karen R. “Nielsen, Hindemith and Schoenberg: Foundations of the Twentieth-Century Wind Quintet.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Catholic U of America. Accessed July 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:28263.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moses, Karen R. “Nielsen, Hindemith and Schoenberg: Foundations of the Twentieth-Century Wind Quintet.” 2015. Web. 15 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Moses KR. Nielsen, Hindemith and Schoenberg: Foundations of the Twentieth-Century Wind Quintet. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Catholic U of America; 2015. [cited 2019 Jul 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:28263.

Council of Science Editors:

Moses KR. Nielsen, Hindemith and Schoenberg: Foundations of the Twentieth-Century Wind Quintet. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Catholic U of America; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:28263

3. Pecknold, Sara Michael. "On Lightest Leaves Do I Fly": Redemption and the Renewal of Identity in Barbara Strozzi's Sacri musicali affetti (1655).

Degree: PhD, Musicology, 2015, Catholic U of America

In 1655, Venetian composer Barbara Strozzi issued her only sacred opus, the Sacri musicali affetti, a volume of fourteen stunningly virtuosic solo motets. Scholars have puzzled over her motivation to do so. My dissertation argues that Strozzi published the Sacri musicali affetti the year before her illegitimate daughters entered the convent of San Sepolcro in order to refashion her identity from the immoral muse of her father's Accademia degli Unisoni to a devout mother of consecrated, virginal daughters. Strozzi dedicated the print to Anna de' Medici, Archduchess of Innsbruck, and chose as the first motet a paean to Saint Anne, whose pious but non-virginal motherhood of Mary serves as an exemplar for Strozzi's supplication for transformation. Each chapter examines the motets according to theological-thematic type: Marian motets, motets to Saint Peter, motets to the Blessed Sacrament and to the Most Holy Name of God, and motets to Saints Jerome, Benedict, and Anthony. Within each category, the dissertation brings to light several previously unknown associations between the Sacri musicali affetti and various contextual phenomena. The chapters conclude with textual-musical analyses, which examine Strozzi's nuanced treatment of the motets' profound liturgical intertextuality. In the conclusion, I consider the significance of the final motet to Saint Anthony of Padua in light of Strozzi's reception of the Sacrament of Penance just before her death in Padua in 1677. I suggest that Strozzi traveled to Padua in order to celebrate the Feast of Saint Anthony in June of that year, and to receive the indulgence offered to pilgrims who visited Anthony's tomb on his feast day.

Degree awarded: Ph.D. Musicology. The Catholic University of America

Advisors/Committee Members: Weaver, Andrew H. (Advisor), Wagstaff, Grayson (Other), Rosand, Ellen (Other), Johnson, Glen (Other), Kopár, Lilla (Other).

Subjects/Keywords: Music; European history; Religious history; Affetti; Innsbruck; Strozzi; Venice

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pecknold, S. M. (2015). "On Lightest Leaves Do I Fly": Redemption and the Renewal of Identity in Barbara Strozzi's Sacri musicali affetti (1655). (Doctoral Dissertation). Catholic U of America. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:28293

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pecknold, Sara Michael. “"On Lightest Leaves Do I Fly": Redemption and the Renewal of Identity in Barbara Strozzi's Sacri musicali affetti (1655).” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Catholic U of America. Accessed July 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:28293.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pecknold, Sara Michael. “"On Lightest Leaves Do I Fly": Redemption and the Renewal of Identity in Barbara Strozzi's Sacri musicali affetti (1655).” 2015. Web. 15 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Pecknold SM. "On Lightest Leaves Do I Fly": Redemption and the Renewal of Identity in Barbara Strozzi's Sacri musicali affetti (1655). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Catholic U of America; 2015. [cited 2019 Jul 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:28293.

Council of Science Editors:

Pecknold SM. "On Lightest Leaves Do I Fly": Redemption and the Renewal of Identity in Barbara Strozzi's Sacri musicali affetti (1655). [Doctoral Dissertation]. Catholic U of America; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/cuislandora:28293

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