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You searched for +publisher:"California State University – Sacramento" +contributor:("Bancroft, Kimberly"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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California State University – Sacramento

1. Hajek, Kristina N. Apply yourself! Helping low socio-economic status Latino and African American students achieve their post-secondary dreams.

Degree: MA, Education (Curriculum and Instruction, 2010, California State University – Sacramento

Although enrollment at post-secondary institutions is up overall, there is still a significant gap between the percentages of Caucasian students that attend a post-secondary institution in contrast to Latino and African American students. Sources of Data Data for this project were gathered from current intervention programs that assist Latino and African American students with the post-secondary goals, peer-reviewed journals in the field of Education, and census data from the U.S. government. Conclusions Reached In order to encourage more Latino and African American students to successfully apply to post-secondary institutions, they need a curriculum that can give them current information about the application process, access to resources to be able to apply to these institutions, and a supportive environment from teachers and peers. Advisors/Committee Members: Bancroft, Kimberly.

Subjects/Keywords: College applications; Admissions; Minority students

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hajek, K. N. (2010). Apply yourself! Helping low socio-economic status Latino and African American students achieve their post-secondary dreams. (Masters Thesis). California State University – Sacramento. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10211.9/157

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hajek, Kristina N. “Apply yourself! Helping low socio-economic status Latino and African American students achieve their post-secondary dreams.” 2010. Masters Thesis, California State University – Sacramento. Accessed June 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10211.9/157.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hajek, Kristina N. “Apply yourself! Helping low socio-economic status Latino and African American students achieve their post-secondary dreams.” 2010. Web. 19 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Hajek KN. Apply yourself! Helping low socio-economic status Latino and African American students achieve their post-secondary dreams. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. California State University – Sacramento; 2010. [cited 2019 Jun 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10211.9/157.

Council of Science Editors:

Hajek KN. Apply yourself! Helping low socio-economic status Latino and African American students achieve their post-secondary dreams. [Masters Thesis]. California State University – Sacramento; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10211.9/157


California State University – Sacramento

2. Brumfield, Shanell Latrice. Navigating through academia: an examination of the effects of race, class, and gender on the academic achievement of African American female students.

Degree: MA, Education (Behavioral Sciences/Gender Equity Studies, 2010, California State University – Sacramento

This study examines the effects of intersection of race, class, and gender on the educational experiences of African American female students. Many community forces affect the academic achievement of African American female students. For example, racial identity has been documented as contributing to the educational environment of African American students. African Americans are part of a racially stratified group in which their membership is permanent. Because of the historical implications of institutional racism controlled by the dominant culture, African Americans have learned to be skeptical of anything associated with the dominant culture. According to Ogbu (1992), African Americans are involuntary minorities, who are skeptical about the means of advancing in a society that is controlled by the dominant culture. Class also has a strong impact on the educational experience of African American students. For students who are from low socioeconomic backgrounds, parent involvement is often low and educational resources are scarce. According to Slaughter and Epps (1987), ???parents influence their children???s academic achievement directly by their impact on the schools their children attend. Low SES and Black Families often lack the human and material resources needed for a positive academic environment in the house??? (p.19). Lastly, gender bias in the classroom can also affect the academic success of African American female students in the classroom. In early education, when compared to their white counterparts, African American female students receive more instructional communication from their teacher, but are gradually socialized by instructors to be passive (Lips, 1989). The intersecting systems of oppression from racism, classism and sexism make the educational experience of African American female students unique in comparison to their peers of other ethnicities. Sources of Data The researcher sought to understand how factors such as race, class, and gender impact the educational experiences of African American female students. Using the constructivist design, the study attempts to explain the participants??? feelings and experiences as African American female students navigating through academia. Eight African American female students, ages 14-18, participated in this study as well as two Dunlap High Staff members. The methodology employed for this study is based on a qualitative and quantitative research design using a mixed method triangulation approach. Student participants were asked a predetermined set of 17 open-ended questions about their experiences with race, class, and gender within their learning environment. In addition to student participants being interviewed, a 31-question Likert scale survey was used to measure the participants??? levels of agreement to statements addressing race, class, and gender in education. Staff participants were also interviewed regarding their experiences in educating African American female students, and how race, class, and gender impact this particular… Advisors/Committee Members: Bancroft, Kimberly.

Subjects/Keywords: African American female students; Academic achievement; Black feminist thought; Gender bias

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brumfield, S. L. (2010). Navigating through academia: an examination of the effects of race, class, and gender on the academic achievement of African American female students. (Masters Thesis). California State University – Sacramento. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10211.9/615

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brumfield, Shanell Latrice. “Navigating through academia: an examination of the effects of race, class, and gender on the academic achievement of African American female students.” 2010. Masters Thesis, California State University – Sacramento. Accessed June 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10211.9/615.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brumfield, Shanell Latrice. “Navigating through academia: an examination of the effects of race, class, and gender on the academic achievement of African American female students.” 2010. Web. 19 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Brumfield SL. Navigating through academia: an examination of the effects of race, class, and gender on the academic achievement of African American female students. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. California State University – Sacramento; 2010. [cited 2019 Jun 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10211.9/615.

Council of Science Editors:

Brumfield SL. Navigating through academia: an examination of the effects of race, class, and gender on the academic achievement of African American female students. [Masters Thesis]. California State University – Sacramento; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10211.9/615

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