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You searched for +publisher:"California State University – Chico" +contributor:("Transchel, Kate"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Grzebyk, Joseph. Korean comfort women: how Japanese military expansion within East Asia led to systematized prostitution between 1910 and 1945 .

Degree: 2015, California State University – Chico

Japan???s military aggression throughout East Asia during World War II largely hinged on the colonization of Korea. Although Japan controlled various other areas of Asia, Korea had a variety of valuable resources that aided Japanese Imperialism. Korea was a country that possessed tactical military advantages, valuable natural resources, and the abundant potential for human labor. Although Japan benefitted from colonizing Korea, Koreans struggled under the yoke of Japanese oppression. At the heart of Korean suffering lies the creation of prostitution centers known as comfort stations. Japan abducted or ???enlisted??? somewhere around 200,000 Korean women for centers established near areas frequented by Japanese troops. Many of the women kidnapped by Japanese recruiters existed in a state of virtual slavery and exposed to a battery of daily beatings and rapes. As a result of culture and shame, numerous survivors of comfort stations hid their experiences for the better part of fifty years. Only recently has the issue surfaced in popular media. The Japanese government managed to hide the guilt of their actions after the war, but in the face of current accusations, they are no longer able to deny the actions of their military and the existence of comfort women. My research attempts to deconstruct the commonly accepted narrative about comfort women. What would the phenomenon look like from a different perspective ??? one that didn???t assume Japanese guilt? I attempt to build a counter-factual history to see if the story of Japanese colonization and exploitation of Korean women might be more complex than it looks on the surface. For the basis of my study, I decided to look at the factors that contributed to the rise of Korean women in comfort stations. The main questions that guided my research explored other plausible explanations for the exposure of Korea women to sexual predators. For instance, how did the Japanese colonization of Korea create an avenue for Korean oppression, manipulation, and abduction? Also, did modernization play a role in the rise of Korean comfort women? Finally and most importantly, this thesis explores the premise of a possible relationship between Korean culture, beliefs, and history in the creation of comfort women. Advisors/Committee Members: Transchel, Kate (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: World War II; Prostitution; Japanese Imperialism; Korean comfort women

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Grzebyk, J. (2015). Korean comfort women: how Japanese military expansion within East Asia led to systematized prostitution between 1910 and 1945 . (Thesis). California State University – Chico. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/144856

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Grzebyk, Joseph. “Korean comfort women: how Japanese military expansion within East Asia led to systematized prostitution between 1910 and 1945 .” 2015. Thesis, California State University – Chico. Accessed March 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/144856.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Grzebyk, Joseph. “Korean comfort women: how Japanese military expansion within East Asia led to systematized prostitution between 1910 and 1945 .” 2015. Web. 20 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Grzebyk J. Korean comfort women: how Japanese military expansion within East Asia led to systematized prostitution between 1910 and 1945 . [Internet] [Thesis]. California State University – Chico; 2015. [cited 2019 Mar 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/144856.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Grzebyk J. Korean comfort women: how Japanese military expansion within East Asia led to systematized prostitution between 1910 and 1945 . [Thesis]. California State University – Chico; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/144856

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


California State University – Chico

2. Morey, Shane. Life, blood, and oxygen: women in the Black Panther Party and the American Indian movement .

Degree: 2013, California State University – Chico

The historiography of the Black Panther Party (BPP) and the American Indian Movement (AIM) abundantly documents the actions of the men in the organizations. Most texts relegate women to a single chapter. The androcentric perspective allows the histories of these two revolutionary groups to ignore the struggles and contributions of the female members. This thesis examines the roles of the women in the BPP and AIM from standpoint feminism. Life, Blood, and Oxygen asks a variation of Julie D. Shayne???s ???revolution question:??? what did revolution offer women and what did women offer revolution? By researching women???s autobiographies and writings as viable historical documents, this analysis gives voice to these women and their contributions to the movement. By asking the question, ???What did revolution offer women,??? the thesis studies the triple oppression of race, class, and gender that women from these two communities experienced. It covers the women???s reasons for becoming involved in paramilitary organizations, government programs such as the forced sterilization programs, and other subsequent attacks on the bodies of women compelled the women to take up arms. Women did not just experience discrimination from outside forces, but also from sexual discrimination that prevailed within the Panthers and the American Indian Movement. Given the misogyny in these two organizations, what did revolution offer women? The final section asks the second half of the question, ???What did women offer revolution???? By asserting that a revolution must be defined by the objectives that it desires to achieve, Life, Blood, and Oxygen answers it by examining the actions of women during the Panther???s ???Service to the People??? programs and women???s participation in AIM during the occupations of Alcatraz and Wounded Knee. Both AIM and the BPP released revolutionary statements in their platforms, although it was the women that made these demands possible and delivered them to the masses. Women offered the revolution life, blood, and oxygen by providing their communities with food, education, and medical care to keep the struggle going. These women had various motives for their actions. Many were mothers and students who witnessed daily the needs of the people in their communities. Today, many of the women who participated in the 1960???s and 1970???s revolutionary movements continue to be active in the fight for justice. Former members of the BPP and AIM continue to fight for social change. Advisors/Committee Members: Transchel, Kate (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Black Panther Party; Women; American Indian Movement

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Morey, S. (2013). Life, blood, and oxygen: women in the Black Panther Party and the American Indian movement . (Thesis). California State University – Chico. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10211.4/558

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Morey, Shane. “Life, blood, and oxygen: women in the Black Panther Party and the American Indian movement .” 2013. Thesis, California State University – Chico. Accessed March 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10211.4/558.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Morey, Shane. “Life, blood, and oxygen: women in the Black Panther Party and the American Indian movement .” 2013. Web. 20 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Morey S. Life, blood, and oxygen: women in the Black Panther Party and the American Indian movement . [Internet] [Thesis]. California State University – Chico; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10211.4/558.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Morey S. Life, blood, and oxygen: women in the Black Panther Party and the American Indian movement . [Thesis]. California State University – Chico; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10211.4/558

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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