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You searched for +publisher:"Cal Poly" +contributor:("Clark Savage Turner"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Cal Poly

1. Vũ, John Huân. Software Internationalization: A Framework Validated Against Industry Requirements for Computer Science and Software Engineering Programs.

Degree: MS, Computer Science, 2010, Cal Poly

View John Huân Vũ's thesis presentation at <a href="http://youtu.be/y3bzNmkTr-c" title="Thesis Presentation">http://youtu.be/y3bzNmkTr-c</a>. In 2001, the ACM and IEEE Computing Curriculum stated that it was necessary to address "the need to develop implementation models that are international in scope and could be practiced in universities around the world." With increasing connectivity through the internet, the move towards a global economy and growing use of technology places software internationalization as a more important concern for developers. However, there has been a "clear shortage in terms of numbers of trained persons applying for entry-level positions" in this area. Eric Brechner, Director of Microsoft Development Training, suggested five new courses to add to the computer science curriculum due to the growing "gap between what college graduates in any field are taught and what they need to know to work in industry." He concludes that "globalization and accessibility should be part of any course of introductory programming," stating: A course on globalization and accessibility is long overdue on college campuses. It is embarrassing to take graduates from a college with a diverse student population and have to teach them how to write software for a diverse set of customers. This should be part of introductory software development. Anything less is insulting to students, their family, and the peoples of the world. There is very little research into how the subject of software internationalization should be taught to meet the major requirements of the industry. The research question of the thesis is thus, "Is there a framework for software internationalization that has been validated against industry requirements?" The answer is no. The framework "would promote communication between academia and industry ... that could serve as a common reference point in discussions." Since no such framework for software internationalization currently exists, one will be developed here. The contribution of this thesis includes a provisional framework to prepare graduates to internationalize software and a validation of the framework against industry requirements. The requirement of this framework is to provide a portable and standardized set of requirements for computer science and software engineering programs to teach future graduates. Advisors/Committee Members: Clark Savage Turner.

Subjects/Keywords: Software Internationalization; Software Localization; Software Globalization; Computer Science Education; Software Engineering Education; Industry Survey; Industry Questionnaire; Industry Case Study; Statistics; Hypothesis Testing; Applied Statistics; Bilingual, Multilingual, and Multicultural Education; Categorical Data Analysis; Clinical Trials; Curriculum and Instruction; Design of Experiments and Sample Surveys; Educational Assessment, Evaluation, and Research; Educational Psychology; Graphics and Human Computer Interfaces; International and Comparative Education; Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computing; Other Applied Mathematics; Other Computer Sciences; Other Education; Other Mathematics; Other Physical Sciences and Mathematics; Other Statistics and Probability; Quantitative, Qualitative, Comparative, and Historical Methodologies; Software Engineering; Statistical Methodology; Statistical Models; Statistics and Probability

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vũ, J. H. (2010). Software Internationalization: A Framework Validated Against Industry Requirements for Computer Science and Software Engineering Programs. (Masters Thesis). Cal Poly. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/248 ; 10.15368/theses.2010.18

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vũ, John Huân. “Software Internationalization: A Framework Validated Against Industry Requirements for Computer Science and Software Engineering Programs.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Cal Poly. Accessed October 15, 2019. https://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/248 ; 10.15368/theses.2010.18.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vũ, John Huân. “Software Internationalization: A Framework Validated Against Industry Requirements for Computer Science and Software Engineering Programs.” 2010. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Vũ JH. Software Internationalization: A Framework Validated Against Industry Requirements for Computer Science and Software Engineering Programs. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Cal Poly; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/248 ; 10.15368/theses.2010.18.

Council of Science Editors:

Vũ JH. Software Internationalization: A Framework Validated Against Industry Requirements for Computer Science and Software Engineering Programs. [Masters Thesis]. Cal Poly; 2010. Available from: https://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/248 ; 10.15368/theses.2010.18

2. Stieber, Marcel Colman Eric. Radio Direction Finding Network Receiver Design for Low-cost Public Service Applications.

Degree: MS, Electrical Engineering, 2012, Cal Poly

A low-cost radio direction finding (RDF) VHF receiver has been investigated for development into a radio direction finding network (RDFN) with a particular focus towards public service and commercial asset tracking applications. The primary design criteria were reproducibility, low-cost, and simplicity such that public service and volunteer organizations can benefit from the technology. Two receiver designs were built and tested to allow for comparison of practicality, cost, and accuracy. A pseudo-Doppler RDF and a time difference of arrival (TDOA) receiver were built as proof-of-concept for a system design based on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components. The pseudo-Doppler system is a less practical implementation due to the necessity for custom hardware, a large antenna system, and an increased directional error due to multipath and weak signals. The TDOA system has potential as a very simple and low-cost RDFN implementation, but requires extremely accurate time synchronization that is difficult to achieve using COTS GPS receiver modules. The final proposed solution takes advantage of the simple TDOA hardware and multiple detection techniques (including signal strength) to produce improved locational data and ultimately provide a more accurate estimate of position. Further development and improvements to this receiver design have the potential for implementation as a low-cost radio direction finding network. Advisors/Committee Members: Clark Savage Turner.

Subjects/Keywords: Time Difference of Arrival; TDOA; Pseudo-Doppler; APRS; GPS Timing; Clock; Systems and Communications

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stieber, M. C. E. (2012). Radio Direction Finding Network Receiver Design for Low-cost Public Service Applications. (Masters Thesis). Cal Poly. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/889 ; 10.15368/theses.2012.210

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stieber, Marcel Colman Eric. “Radio Direction Finding Network Receiver Design for Low-cost Public Service Applications.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Cal Poly. Accessed October 15, 2019. https://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/889 ; 10.15368/theses.2012.210.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stieber, Marcel Colman Eric. “Radio Direction Finding Network Receiver Design for Low-cost Public Service Applications.” 2012. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Stieber MCE. Radio Direction Finding Network Receiver Design for Low-cost Public Service Applications. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Cal Poly; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/889 ; 10.15368/theses.2012.210.

Council of Science Editors:

Stieber MCE. Radio Direction Finding Network Receiver Design for Low-cost Public Service Applications. [Masters Thesis]. Cal Poly; 2012. Available from: https://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/889 ; 10.15368/theses.2012.210


Cal Poly

3. Estrada, Bryan G. Take Me Back: A Study of the Back Button in the Modern Internet.

Degree: MS, Computer Science, 2011, Cal Poly

The web browser has become one of the most recognizable software applications on consumer desktops. Yet its utilization and capabilities are often misunderstood. Recent innovations in the web have evolved the Internet into a network of sophisticated applications that defy historical uses of the “browser”; a term that itself has become somewhat of a misnomer. This research studies the evolving set of user expectations for the browser as an application platform and challenges certain anachronistic features, specifically the “back” button, that are unnecessary and confusing given the new environment that browsers are used in. Because of this shift, implicit new user requirements arise around the browser’s user interface. The back button, like other elements in the browser have already demonstrated, should be de-emphasized in modern iterations of web browsers. The study is qualified by an analysis of user behavior within a popular, modern, web application. Advisors/Committee Members: Clark Savage Turner, J.D., Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: web apps; back button; browsers; Communication Technology and New Media; Digital Communications and Networking

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Estrada, B. G. (2011). Take Me Back: A Study of the Back Button in the Modern Internet. (Masters Thesis). Cal Poly. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/553 ; 10.15368/theses.2011.110

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Estrada, Bryan G. “Take Me Back: A Study of the Back Button in the Modern Internet.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Cal Poly. Accessed October 15, 2019. https://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/553 ; 10.15368/theses.2011.110.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Estrada, Bryan G. “Take Me Back: A Study of the Back Button in the Modern Internet.” 2011. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Estrada BG. Take Me Back: A Study of the Back Button in the Modern Internet. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Cal Poly; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/553 ; 10.15368/theses.2011.110.

Council of Science Editors:

Estrada BG. Take Me Back: A Study of the Back Button in the Modern Internet. [Masters Thesis]. Cal Poly; 2011. Available from: https://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/553 ; 10.15368/theses.2011.110

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