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You searched for +publisher:"Brown University" +contributor:("Wong, Ian"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Smith, Tyler. The Role of the Transcription Factor SREBP2 in Glioblastoma Cancer Cells.

Degree: Biomedical Engineering, 2017, Brown University

Abstract of The Role of the Transcription Factor SREBP2 in Glioblastoma Cancer Cells, by Tyler Smith, ScM., Brown University, May 2018. Cholesterol is a vital molecule in cellular function, ranging from overall membrane stability to cell signaling. Intracellular cholesterol homeostasis is carefully regulated. The cholesterol pathway is regulated by a master transcription factor SREBP2, whose targets are responsible for both cholesterol synthesis and cholesterol uptake. In this study, we found that a U87 SREBF2-KD cell line is unable to compensate under normal or low cholesterol environment, and that lowered expression of SREBP2 sensitized cells to statins. Activation of the transcription factor LXR, which is responsible for cholesterol efflux, did not display synergistic killing of GBM cancer cells in combination with lower expression of SREBP2. Knock down lines were unable to compensate in neurosphere conditions; however, a phenotype was not fully assessed in that model. This SREBF2-KD line could provide great insight into GBM treatments, and furthermore the technology could be applied to GBM patient derived lines. Advisors/Committee Members: Brodsky, Alexander (Advisor), Wong, Ian (Reader), Webb, Ashley (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Cancer

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, T. (2017). The Role of the Transcription Factor SREBP2 in Glioblastoma Cancer Cells. (Thesis). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:733518/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Tyler. “The Role of the Transcription Factor SREBP2 in Glioblastoma Cancer Cells.” 2017. Thesis, Brown University. Accessed March 24, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:733518/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Tyler. “The Role of the Transcription Factor SREBP2 in Glioblastoma Cancer Cells.” 2017. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Smith T. The Role of the Transcription Factor SREBP2 in Glioblastoma Cancer Cells. [Internet] [Thesis]. Brown University; 2017. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:733518/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Smith T. The Role of the Transcription Factor SREBP2 in Glioblastoma Cancer Cells. [Thesis]. Brown University; 2017. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:733518/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Shah, Manisha. Role of Mechanophenotype in Cell-Substrate Interactions.

Degree: Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology and Biotechnology, 2018, Brown University

Cellular mechanophenotype is defined as the elastic and viscoelastic properties of a cell, and is commonly characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Assessment of a cell’s mechanophenotype in the larger context of its microenvironment can add to increased understanding of biological phenomena such a cellular organization, proliferation, shape, motility, and differentiation. Here, we aim to (1) characterize the mechanical properties and differentiation potential of cells present in human lipoaspirate, (2) examine the influence of inherent mechanophenotype on cell-cell-substrate organization, and (3) assess incorporation of compliant microparticles into cancer vs. normal spheroids. Advisors/Committee Members: Darling, Eric (Advisor), Morgan, Jeffrey (Reader), Wong, Ian (Reader), Coulombe, Kareen (Reader), Slater, John (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Atomic force microscopy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shah, M. (2018). Role of Mechanophenotype in Cell-Substrate Interactions. (Thesis). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792653/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shah, Manisha. “Role of Mechanophenotype in Cell-Substrate Interactions.” 2018. Thesis, Brown University. Accessed March 24, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792653/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shah, Manisha. “Role of Mechanophenotype in Cell-Substrate Interactions.” 2018. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Shah M. Role of Mechanophenotype in Cell-Substrate Interactions. [Internet] [Thesis]. Brown University; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792653/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Shah M. Role of Mechanophenotype in Cell-Substrate Interactions. [Thesis]. Brown University; 2018. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792653/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Andrews, Christina. A Biophysical Analysis of Neutrophil Force Generation in a Biochemical Environment.

Degree: Biomedical Engineering, 2018, Brown University

Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating white blood cell in the human body, and play a crucial role in the innate immune response to infection and inflammation. Sepsis is a systemic bacterial infection that results in a complex immune response. In this event, neutrophils are exposed to an excess of chemical stimuli that results in over activation. These over-activated neutrophils cause tissue damage, organ dysfunction, and death. In this project, I will study the change in cellular mechanisms between naïve and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated neutrophils by quantifying the material displacement fields and surface tractions. This will provide information moving forward to understand the mechanical dysregulation that neutrophils undergo at a heightened activation state. This data will aid our understanding of neutrophil biochemical and mechanical sensing to recognize injury, and then migrate to the site of injury. In this study, I will identify the change in neutrophil motility and force generation before and after LPS activation. I use human fibronectin and human ICAM-1 coated on mechanically tunable polyacrylamide hydrogels (E=1.7 kPa and 8.7 kPa) to study naïve and LPS-activated neutrophils. By studying material displacement fields and surface tractions, the Franck Lab will better understand healthy and over-activated neutrophil motility and identify key phenotypic markers to detect and provide treatment in the event of sepsis. This will further help establish a baseline on the relationship between mechanics and cellular mechanisms, with a focus on neutrophil migration and adhesion. Advisors/Committee Members: Franck, Christian (Advisor), Lefort, Craig (Reader), Reichner, Jonathan (Reader), Wong, Ian (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Immunology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Andrews, C. (2018). A Biophysical Analysis of Neutrophil Force Generation in a Biochemical Environment. (Thesis). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792823/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Andrews, Christina. “A Biophysical Analysis of Neutrophil Force Generation in a Biochemical Environment.” 2018. Thesis, Brown University. Accessed March 24, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792823/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Andrews, Christina. “A Biophysical Analysis of Neutrophil Force Generation in a Biochemical Environment.” 2018. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Andrews C. A Biophysical Analysis of Neutrophil Force Generation in a Biochemical Environment. [Internet] [Thesis]. Brown University; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792823/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Andrews C. A Biophysical Analysis of Neutrophil Force Generation in a Biochemical Environment. [Thesis]. Brown University; 2018. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792823/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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