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You searched for +publisher:"Brown University" +contributor:("Ridout, Nicholas"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Nye, Alice C. Stages of Risk: Economies of Ambivalence in Cancer Genetics.

Degree: PhD, Theatre Arts and Performance Studies, 2014, Brown University

This dissertation examines the constitutive relation of gender and performance to knowledge production in the genetic sciences in twentieth and twenty-first century US. In recent decades, a series of contradictions have emerged in the field of breast and ovarian cancer genetics that challenge common distinctions between biological nature and cultural artifice. From laboratory practices of cloning and patenting genes to medical practices of treating genetic risk as a disease by surgically removing healthy breasts and ovaries, this project argues that scientific understandings of genetic “natures” are drawing on mimetic “second natures” as a privileged mode of inquiry, evidence, and intervention. Combining archival and ethnographic research with critical analysis of medial, textual, and visual cultures, each chapter of this dissertation takes up a key paradox that inheres in the new genetics. In the process, it illuminates the rise of an alternative approach to knowledge production in which stakeholders are highlighting the ontological ambivalence of scientific knowledge objects, rather than treating them as natural or unmediated matters of fact. Across diverse social, scientific, clinical, economic, and legal domains, this project shows how practices of staging the artifice of biological nature and rendering mimesis apparent have come to characterize modes of knowing and intervening in bodies. This epistemic shift toward staging the constructedness of biological realities signals three broader mutations in contemporary economies of gender and technoscience. First, conventionally feminized modes of knowing such as affect, imitation, and relation are increasingly vital, not inimical, to scientific practice. Second, lay actors are playing a more active and critical role in producing and contesting genetic knowledge. And lastly, by staging, rather than effacing, the construction of genetic natures, lay and expert stakeholders are rendering newly apparent the uneven social, economic, and political landscape of women’s health. Advisors/Committee Members: Schneider, Rebecca (Director), Hamdy, Sherine (Reader), Ybarra, Patricia (Reader), Ridout, Nicholas (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Biomedicine

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nye, A. C. (2014). Stages of Risk: Economies of Ambivalence in Cancer Genetics. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386332/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nye, Alice C. “Stages of Risk: Economies of Ambivalence in Cancer Genetics.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Brown University. Accessed March 06, 2021. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386332/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nye, Alice C. “Stages of Risk: Economies of Ambivalence in Cancer Genetics.” 2014. Web. 06 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Nye AC. Stages of Risk: Economies of Ambivalence in Cancer Genetics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brown University; 2014. [cited 2021 Mar 06]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386332/.

Council of Science Editors:

Nye AC. Stages of Risk: Economies of Ambivalence in Cancer Genetics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brown University; 2014. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386332/

2. Goss, Lindsay Evan. Entertaining the Movement: Jane Fonda, GI Resistance, and the FTA.

Degree: PhD, Theatre Arts and Performance Studies, 2014, Brown University

This dissertation reframes contemporary investments in political performance through an analysis of the politics and practices of the FTA, a GI-oriented antiwar variety show led by Jane Fonda. Over the course of nine months in 1971, the FTA played to tens of thousands of active-duty U.S. troops at home and overseas. Though modeled on the then-familiar format of Bob Hope’s USO-sponsored performances, the FTA (its name a reference to a slogan popular among disaffected GIs: “Free [or F – ] the Army”) presented material that was explicitly anti-war, anti-sexist, and anti-racist. Despite the show’s popularity and impact, the FTA appears nowhere in the theatre historical narrative of 1960s and ‘70s political performance—an omission that obscures key contours of the era’s artistic and political radicalization. This project reconstructs a history of the FTA in order to examine the terms according to which politically motivated performance practices fail to appear in histories of theatre and/or protest. Dependent upon celebrity performers and a popular form, the FTA sits outside a narrative of U.S. political performance that emphasizes, in varying combinations, avant-garde experimentation, collectivity, community, and audience participation. I argue that the FTA’s odd constellation of associated subjects-as-objects—specifically, its feature film (FTA!, released in 1972) full of GI spectators, as well as the controversial afterlives of actress-activist Fonda—productively disrupts this narrative, and makes apparent the political underpinnings of the contemporary definitions and investments in “political theatre” and the avant-garde that follow from it. Examining in particular the contradictory ways in which charges and claims of “just acting” attached to the actors and audiences of the FTA, I posit a theory of tactical acting, which deploys the presumed inauthenticity and illegitimacy of “staged” activity in order to enact relations of solidarity and threats of violence from the safety of theatre’s plausible deniability. I argue that such a theory is critical to understanding the political potential of activist performance, as well as to assessing the political implications of framing protest “as performance.” Advisors/Committee Members: Ybarra, Patricia (Director), Ybarra, Patricia (Reader), Schneider, Rebecca (Reader), Ridout, Nicholas (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Theatre history

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Goss, L. E. (2014). Entertaining the Movement: Jane Fonda, GI Resistance, and the FTA. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386331/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Goss, Lindsay Evan. “Entertaining the Movement: Jane Fonda, GI Resistance, and the FTA.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Brown University. Accessed March 06, 2021. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386331/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Goss, Lindsay Evan. “Entertaining the Movement: Jane Fonda, GI Resistance, and the FTA.” 2014. Web. 06 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Goss LE. Entertaining the Movement: Jane Fonda, GI Resistance, and the FTA. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brown University; 2014. [cited 2021 Mar 06]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386331/.

Council of Science Editors:

Goss LE. Entertaining the Movement: Jane Fonda, GI Resistance, and the FTA. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brown University; 2014. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386331/

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