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You searched for +publisher:"Brown University" +contributor:("Ranney, Megan"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Hajjar, Maurice Edward. Emergency Department Texting Lifespan with Care: The Feasibility and Acceptability of a Bidirectional Text Message-Based Intervention in the Emergency Department.

Degree: School of Public Health, 2018, Brown University

Background: Text messaging improves adherence to medication and follow-up appointments in outpatient populations. Disease-specific text message programs are acceptable and feasible in the emergency department (ED). The feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of bidirectional, post-discharge text messaging for undifferentiated chief complaints have not been determined. Methods: A convenience sample of English-speaking, discharged adult patients with any non-psychiatric complaint was recruited from two EDs over seven months. Consenting participants completed a validated baseline survey and were randomized to receive either usual care (UC) or post-discharge text messages plus usual care (SMS). SMS participants received three days of automated messages asking if they made followup appointments and filled prescriptions. The primary outcome was feasibility and acceptability of SMS (defined as message response rate >60%; System Usability Scale (SUS) score >68; and rate of users needing nurse contact), assessed with descriptive statistics. Secondary outcomes were satisfaction (willingness to return to same ED per validated, post-intervention questionnaire), discharge instruction adherence (self-report of filling prescriptions and making appointments), and return visits to in-network EDs within 14 days, comparing UC and SMS groups with multivariable logistic regression. Theory-based covariates included age, gender, race, ethnicity, income, chief complaint, and ED utilization. Results: 220 participants (76.1% of eligible) consented; 109 (49.6%) randomized to SMS; 160 (73.0%) completed seven-day follow-up. Mean age was 35.9 (SD 13.6); 51.8% were female; 49.5% were non-Hispanic white. Overall SMS response rate was 70.0%. Mean SUS score was 75.5 (SD 22.4). Only five (2.3%) participants required nurse contact based on message responses. Compared to UC, SMS participants had adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.79 (95%CI 0.27-3.20) of satisfaction; aOR 1.88 (95%CI 0.89-3.97) of making a follow-up appointment; aOR 1.32 (95%CI 0.40-4.39) of filling prescriptions; and aOR 1.62 (95%CI 0.53-4.91) of a 14-day return visit. Conclusion: Automated, bidirectional text messaging is feasible and acceptable to discharged adult ED patients. Studies with larger sample sizes are needed to define the association between this intervention and satisfaction, discharge instruction adherence, and ED recidivism. Advisors/Committee Members: Ranney, Megan (Advisor), Sullivan, Adam (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Emergency medicine

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hajjar, M. E. (2018). Emergency Department Texting Lifespan with Care: The Feasibility and Acceptability of a Bidirectional Text Message-Based Intervention in the Emergency Department. (Thesis). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792688/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hajjar, Maurice Edward. “Emergency Department Texting Lifespan with Care: The Feasibility and Acceptability of a Bidirectional Text Message-Based Intervention in the Emergency Department.” 2018. Thesis, Brown University. Accessed March 23, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792688/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hajjar, Maurice Edward. “Emergency Department Texting Lifespan with Care: The Feasibility and Acceptability of a Bidirectional Text Message-Based Intervention in the Emergency Department.” 2018. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Hajjar ME. Emergency Department Texting Lifespan with Care: The Feasibility and Acceptability of a Bidirectional Text Message-Based Intervention in the Emergency Department. [Internet] [Thesis]. Brown University; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792688/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hajjar ME. Emergency Department Texting Lifespan with Care: The Feasibility and Acceptability of a Bidirectional Text Message-Based Intervention in the Emergency Department. [Thesis]. Brown University; 2018. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792688/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Magid, Kate. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand Intentions to Perform Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Among College Students.

Degree: School of Public Health, 2018, Brown University

The purpose of this project was to use the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to explain health behaviors performed by university students. In the review component of this project, the TPB was applied to behaviors related to alcohol use, drug use, tobacco use, diet, exercise, condom use, sleep, vaccinations, and mental health treatment. In the study component of this project, the TPB was used to explain what motivates bystanders to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on a cardiac arrest victim. The objective of the study was to determine the extent to which the TPB accounts for variability in intention to perform CPR; to explore which constructs in the TPB significantly and most strongly predict intention to perform CPR; and to examine sex-based differences in TPB constructs and intention to perform CPR among college students. In the study, 588 undergraduate students responded to a cross-sectional TPB survey about performing CPR. Based on multivariate linear regression analyses, attitude was the strongest predictor of intention to perform CPR ( = 0.381, p<0.001), followed by subjective norm ( = 0.303, p<0.001), and perceived behavioral control ( =0.167, p<0.001). The TPB accounted for 51% of the variance in intention to perform CPR (F[3, 536]=186, p<0.001). There were no sex-based differences in intention to perform CPR. This research has implications for designing CPR trainings. Specifically, resuscitation trainings that highlight positive outcomes and social norms associated with performing CPR may help bystanders form intentions to perform CPR, and may increase the likelihood that they will perform CPR in an emergency. Advisors/Committee Members: Risica, Patricia (Advisor), Ranney, Megan (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: College students

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Magid, K. (2018). Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand Intentions to Perform Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Among College Students. (Thesis). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792691/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Magid, Kate. “Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand Intentions to Perform Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Among College Students.” 2018. Thesis, Brown University. Accessed March 23, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792691/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Magid, Kate. “Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand Intentions to Perform Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Among College Students.” 2018. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Magid K. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand Intentions to Perform Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Among College Students. [Internet] [Thesis]. Brown University; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792691/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Magid K. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand Intentions to Perform Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Among College Students. [Thesis]. Brown University; 2018. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792691/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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