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You searched for +publisher:"Brown University" +contributor:("Oliver, Graham"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Machado, Dominic. Community and Collective Action in the Roman Republican Army (218 – 44 BCE).

Degree: Department of Classics, 2017, Brown University

From Polybius in the second century BCE to Delbrück in the twentieth century CE, scholars have devoted significant energy to understanding how the Roman army of the Republic was able to work so effectively, examining its organization, hierarchy, recruitment, tactics and ideology in detail. In these close studies of the structures and systems of the Republican army, soldiers and their motivations, interests and goals beyond their military duties have been of little concern. This dissertation attempts to redress the lack of attention that Republican soldiers have received by studying the development of military communities during the last two centuries of the Republic. It argues that the nature and ideology of Roman military service created a sense of community among soldiers on campaign from the third century BCE onwards (Chapter 1). These feelings of community made them powerful as a group. They were capable of acting collectively to protect the social and economic interests of the group while on campaign and were willing to take on Roman power structures in order to do so (Chapter 3). Further, the agency and power that military communities possessed did not dissipate when they returned home. Rather, they continued to act collectively, particularly in political matters, to ensure that their concerns were heard (Chapter 4). Further, this project demonstrates that, in spite of the claims of our sources, Roman camps were not hermetically sealed, soldier-only zones. Beyond the connections that Roman soldiers established with one another, they also developed relationships with the various non-combatants that they met while on campaign (Chapter 2). In fact, some of the bonds that were created, particularly those with local women, ultimately led to the integration of Roman soldiers within local communities and laid the foundation for Roman settlements in the region. The Roman armies of the Republican period were not just effective fighting forces, but they were dynamically constructed communities that had a significant impact on various social, economic and political aspects of the Roman world as well. Advisors/Committee Members: Bodel, John (Advisor), Mignone, Lisa (Advisor), Oliver, Graham (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Rome (Empire)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Machado, D. (2017). Community and Collective Action in the Roman Republican Army (218 – 44 BCE). (Thesis). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:733431/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Machado, Dominic. “Community and Collective Action in the Roman Republican Army (218 – 44 BCE).” 2017. Thesis, Brown University. Accessed September 19, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:733431/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Machado, Dominic. “Community and Collective Action in the Roman Republican Army (218 – 44 BCE).” 2017. Web. 19 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Machado D. Community and Collective Action in the Roman Republican Army (218 – 44 BCE). [Internet] [Thesis]. Brown University; 2017. [cited 2019 Sep 19]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:733431/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Machado D. Community and Collective Action in the Roman Republican Army (218 – 44 BCE). [Thesis]. Brown University; 2017. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:733431/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Mulder, Tara L. Fetal Actors, Female Bodies: Childbirth in the Roman Empire.

Degree: PhD, Classics, 2015, Brown University

This dissertation is an interdisciplinary investigation into the relationship between pregnant and pre-gravid women and their fetuses in the Roman Empire. It examines the cultural ideologies of reproduction and investigates the contributions of these ideologies to narratives of pregnancy and birth. By putting reproductive age women at the center of the investigation, this work departs from previous scholarship on Roman pregnancy and birth, which has overwhelmingly focused on the unborn fetus or the young child. Chapter one explores ideologies of reproduction and the nature of the maternal/fetal relationship in Roman legal texts. Chapters two and three consider these same issues in the Greco-Roman medical, scientific and philosophical texts of the Roman Empire. Chapter four explores the topic through uterine votives and amulets and birth scenes on biographical sarcophagi from the Roman Mediterranean. Throughout the investigation, four interrelated themes emerge. First there is a focus on the womb as an independent entity, paradoxically contained within the female body, but also capable of autonomous action. This imaginary appears, for instance, in Roman-era medical and scientific accounts of the “wandering womb” and in visual depictions of disembodied, oversized uteri on magical-medical amulets from Roman Egypt. Second, there is a corresponding focus on the fetal actor, valued for its broadly defined potentiality. Third, the notion of an independent, living fetus, endowed with rights, protections and potentialities leads to the creation and propagation of a narrative of maternal/fetal antagonism. The interests of the developing fetus are set in conflict with the interests, actions and choices of the pregnant woman. Fourth, the reproductive age woman is defined by her ability to reproduce—she is always a potential mother. In a pre-gravid state she has the potential to become pregnant. Once pregnant, both her mental and psychic state and her physical actions are seen as having considerable repercussions on the fetus. Out of these themes come the relationships and antagonisms that form the core of this investigation: woman versus womb and woman versus fetus. These narratives form the core of reproductive ideology in the Roman Empire. Advisors/Committee Members: Bodel, John (Director), Oliver, Graham (Reader), Mignone, Lisa (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Roman social history

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mulder, T. L. (2015). Fetal Actors, Female Bodies: Childbirth in the Roman Empire. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:419537/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mulder, Tara L. “Fetal Actors, Female Bodies: Childbirth in the Roman Empire.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Brown University. Accessed September 19, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:419537/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mulder, Tara L. “Fetal Actors, Female Bodies: Childbirth in the Roman Empire.” 2015. Web. 19 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Mulder TL. Fetal Actors, Female Bodies: Childbirth in the Roman Empire. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brown University; 2015. [cited 2019 Sep 19]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:419537/.

Council of Science Editors:

Mulder TL. Fetal Actors, Female Bodies: Childbirth in the Roman Empire. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brown University; 2015. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:419537/

3. Fairbank, Keith Robert. A Dividing Sea: The Adriatic World from the Fourth to the First Centuries BC.

Degree: Department of Classics, 2018, Brown University

The Adriatic Sea both connected and divided the shores of the Italian and Balkan peninsulas in the Hellenistic period (fourth to first centuries BC). The Adriatic world was connected by traders and pirates in maritime networks. But it remained balkanized politically and resisted attempts at conquest. Conceptually, the division of the Mediterranean world down the middle at the Adriatic has lingered in boundaries of states and even fields of history. This dissertation explores the tension between these dividing and connecting aspects of the Adriatic Sea. In the early fourth century BC, as Athenian power waned in the Adriatic, traders participated in loose networks of exchange that had existed for centuries. Over the course of the next four centuries, increasing numbers of people exploited these networks, creating denser connections or “thickening” the linkages of the Adriatic world. By the end of the Hellenistic period, the connections in the Adriatic had grown to the point of “continentalization”, when the whole sea could be viewed as a densely-intertwined whole. The dissertation explores in five chapters ways in which the Adriatic functions as a maritime region that divided and joined peoples. This study builds on, and out of, the ecological approach to the Mediterranean developed by Horden and Purcell. Chapter one examines the geographic, ecological, and intellectual space of the Adriatic and includes a narrative history of the sea. Chapter two explores movement and traders through a series of maps, examining in turn general trade routes, specific commodities, and traders within the Adriatic. Chapter three tackles pirates and piracy in the Adriatic through the lens of Thomas Gallant’s “military entrepreneurs” with an emphasis on the interactions between non-state actors and state-formation. Chapter four engages with settlement and colonization in the Adriatic. Chapter five discusses military aggressions in the sea under the rubric of imperialisms. Advisors/Committee Members: Oliver, Graham (Advisor), van Dommelen, Peter (Reader), Mignone, Lisa (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Economic History

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fairbank, K. R. (2018). A Dividing Sea: The Adriatic World from the Fourth to the First Centuries BC. (Thesis). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792869/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fairbank, Keith Robert. “A Dividing Sea: The Adriatic World from the Fourth to the First Centuries BC.” 2018. Thesis, Brown University. Accessed September 19, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792869/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fairbank, Keith Robert. “A Dividing Sea: The Adriatic World from the Fourth to the First Centuries BC.” 2018. Web. 19 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Fairbank KR. A Dividing Sea: The Adriatic World from the Fourth to the First Centuries BC. [Internet] [Thesis]. Brown University; 2018. [cited 2019 Sep 19]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792869/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Fairbank KR. A Dividing Sea: The Adriatic World from the Fourth to the First Centuries BC. [Thesis]. Brown University; 2018. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792869/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.