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You searched for +publisher:"Brown University" +contributor:("Oklot, Michal"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Dukhanova, Diana. Jesus of Bethlehem: Vasily V. Rozanov and the Discourse of Matrimonial Sexuality in the Russian Orthodox Church.

Degree: Department of Slavic Studies, 2018, Brown University

This study explores the historical lack of an affirmative discourse of matrimonial sexuality in Russian Orthodoxy and religious thought. The study makes the case that this lack arose from the Church’s linkage of Russian Christianity, sexual purity, and Russian cultural exceptionalism and the corresponding linkage of sexual pleasure with religious and cultural otherness. It argues that an underdeveloped discourse of sexuality continues to impact religious practice, social policy, and gender relations in Russia to this day. It also locates a fledgling positive discourse of matrimonial sexuality at the turn of the 20th century in discussions among clergy, theologians, and lay religious thinkers based on concerns around low birthrates, divorce, and the decline of the Russian family, which remain at the forefront of contemporary Russian social discourse. It focuses on one of the leading voices in these discussions, Vasily V. Rozanov (1856-1919). The author of the first systematic exploration of the religious, cultural, and civic dimensions of matrimonial sexuality in Russian thought, The Family Question in Russia (1903), Rozanov argued that sexual pleasure was vital to the sanctity and survival of Christian matrimony and challenged the historical conflation of affirmative sexuality and “the other”, proposing instead an essential Russian predisposition to a sanctified and fruitful conjugal life. In three components, this study traces the evolution of the Russian Orthodox discourse of conjugal sexuality from medieval didactic texts and canon law through Muscovite and Imperial matrimonial law, culminating in a close reading of the 19th-20th century re-evaluation of Orthodox marriage in ecclesiastical and lay journals, books, and public meetings, particularly in engagement with Rozanov. Finally, the study explores post-Soviet pronatalist discourse, which is heavily contingent upon the notions of both sexual purity and reproductive fecundity as essential Russian traits. In this discourse one locates a renewed engagement with V.V. Rozanov’s thought as agents of the Church and State seek to revitalize the Russian family by appealing to cultural notions of exceptionalism. In a larger perspective, this study demonstrates the importance of reevaluating the history of sexuality in Russia for understanding the conflicts around religion, marriage, and reproduction in the post-Soviet space. Advisors/Committee Members: Oklot, Michal (Advisor), Levitsky, Alexander (Reader), Golstein, Vladimir (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Gender

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dukhanova, D. (2018). Jesus of Bethlehem: Vasily V. Rozanov and the Discourse of Matrimonial Sexuality in the Russian Orthodox Church. (Thesis). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792657/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dukhanova, Diana. “Jesus of Bethlehem: Vasily V. Rozanov and the Discourse of Matrimonial Sexuality in the Russian Orthodox Church.” 2018. Thesis, Brown University. Accessed July 10, 2020. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792657/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dukhanova, Diana. “Jesus of Bethlehem: Vasily V. Rozanov and the Discourse of Matrimonial Sexuality in the Russian Orthodox Church.” 2018. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Dukhanova D. Jesus of Bethlehem: Vasily V. Rozanov and the Discourse of Matrimonial Sexuality in the Russian Orthodox Church. [Internet] [Thesis]. Brown University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792657/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Dukhanova D. Jesus of Bethlehem: Vasily V. Rozanov and the Discourse of Matrimonial Sexuality in the Russian Orthodox Church. [Thesis]. Brown University; 2018. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792657/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Faingersh, Ksenia Keren. Performing Communist Myths: the Afterlife of an Orphaned Myth.

Degree: PhD, Slavic Studies, 2014, Brown University

Abstract of Performing The Communist Myths: The Afterlife Of An Orphaned Myth by Ksenia Keren Faingersh, Ph.D., Brown University, May 2014 This thesis explores the “afterlife” of the various Soviet ideological and historical myths, which have succeeded to adapt when placed within a different socio-political frame of post-Soviet Russia. In the beginning of Perestroika, the orphaned myths have been persecuted, dethroned and trampled down; the crisis of the 90s breathed new life into them, providing ground for their renewed relevance and fortification. The analysis is narrowed down to several of the most prominent iconic myths – the quintessential myths of identity: the myth of Lenin, the myth of Stalin, the myth of Pavlik Morozov. Treating the mythical structure at the level of the sign (resorting to structuralist linguistics), the dissertation examines the different modes and patterns of rejuvenation & reincarnation of myth, the tactics of survival. Each of the three iconic Soviet myths examined in this thesis illustrates a different kind of myth – the “ultimate signifier myth” of Lenin, the “eternal signified myth” of Stalin and the “archetypal, symbolic myth” of Pavlik Morozov: each has its unique mechanism of survival in the post-Soviet space. Additionally, this thesis demonstrates that – however different structurally - each of the different myths uses performativity (rigorously linked to a state of liminality) as a means of survival and reproduction. This dissertation, thus, focuses mainly on contemporary plays (of the 90s and the 2000s) and theatrical productions that reveal performative potentials of the orphaned Soviet myths by disassembling and reassembling them in the post-1989 political space. Advisors/Committee Members: Oklot, Michal (Director), Levitsky, Alexander (Reader), Golub, Spencer (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: orphaned myth

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Faingersh, K. K. (2014). Performing Communist Myths: the Afterlife of an Orphaned Myth. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386330/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Faingersh, Ksenia Keren. “Performing Communist Myths: the Afterlife of an Orphaned Myth.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Brown University. Accessed July 10, 2020. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386330/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Faingersh, Ksenia Keren. “Performing Communist Myths: the Afterlife of an Orphaned Myth.” 2014. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Faingersh KK. Performing Communist Myths: the Afterlife of an Orphaned Myth. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brown University; 2014. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386330/.

Council of Science Editors:

Faingersh KK. Performing Communist Myths: the Afterlife of an Orphaned Myth. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brown University; 2014. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386330/

.