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You searched for +publisher:"Brown University" +contributor:("Kosterlitz, J."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Wang, Xi. 3D Neutron Diffraction Studies on the Vortex Lattice.

Degree: PhD, Physics, 2012, Brown University

In condensed matter physics the vortex lattice of type-II superconductors provides a prototype for studying the effect of random pinning on elastic systems. One important problem is to understand the structural transition from a theoretically predicted ordered Bragg glass phase to a disordered vortex liquid phase. Defects, such as screw dislocations, should play an important role in mediating this order-disorder transition. It is important to confirm the existence of these defect structures in the vortex lattice. Experimentally it is difficult to probe the detailed defect structures inside the vortex lattice. Traditional methods can only provide information on the surface configuration or an averaged picture of the bulk behavior of the vortex lattice. Here we use a novel high-resolution neutron diffraction technique to probe the angular orientation of the lattice planes as the flux lines traverse the atomic crystal. Our results provide structural evidence for screw dislocations inside the vortex lattice. The anisotropic defect structure in the underlying atomic lattice serves as a symmetry breaking field for the vortex lattice. The strong dependence of the vortex lattice structure on the growth procedure reveals that the system is metastable and can be perturbed through thermal cycling to a possible ground state. We measure the structure of the vortex lattice under different applied magnetic fields and temperatures to study the interplay between vortex-vortex interaction, vortex-atomic lattice interaction, and thermal fluctuations. This high-resolution neutron diffraction technique opens up a new way in studying the detailed structure of the vortex lattice. Our results suggest that the vortex lattice in low temperature superconductors with anisotropic defects in the atomic lattice could be an excellent candidate for exploring the entangled flux liquid phase. Advisors/Committee Members: Ling, Xinsheng (Director), Kosterlitz, J. (Reader), Mitrovic, Vesna (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: neutron diffraction

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APA (6th Edition):

Wang, X. (2012). 3D Neutron Diffraction Studies on the Vortex Lattice. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:297705/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wang, Xi. “3D Neutron Diffraction Studies on the Vortex Lattice.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Brown University. Accessed February 21, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:297705/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wang, Xi. “3D Neutron Diffraction Studies on the Vortex Lattice.” 2012. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Wang X. 3D Neutron Diffraction Studies on the Vortex Lattice. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brown University; 2012. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:297705/.

Council of Science Editors:

Wang X. 3D Neutron Diffraction Studies on the Vortex Lattice. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brown University; 2012. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:297705/

2. Obeid, Dina N. Noisy Stabilized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky: A modelfor studying state selection in far fromequilibrium systems.

Degree: PhD, Physics, 2011, Brown University

In this thesis we address the question of pattern selection in spatially extendedsystems in the presence of stochastic noise. As a model equation, we study the1D stabilized Kuramoto Sivashinsky equation with additive uncorrelated stochasticnoise. This equation is one of the simplest nonlinear equations that has a variety ofsecondary and even tertiary instabilities. We focus our attention on static stationarystates that are stable against the Eckhaus secondary instability. In the presence ofnoise the Eckhaus stable band of the deterministic equation collapses to a narrowregion near the center of the band. This is consistent with the behavior of the phasediffusion constants of these states. Some connections to the phenomenon of stateselection in driven out of equilibrium systems are made. Advisors/Committee Members: Kosterlitz, J. Michael (Director), Pelcovits, Robert (Reader), Ling, Xinsheng Sean (Reader), Guralnik, Gerald (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Nonequilibrium

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Obeid, D. N. (2011). Noisy Stabilized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky: A modelfor studying state selection in far fromequilibrium systems. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:11168/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Obeid, Dina N. “Noisy Stabilized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky: A modelfor studying state selection in far fromequilibrium systems.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Brown University. Accessed February 21, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:11168/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Obeid, Dina N. “Noisy Stabilized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky: A modelfor studying state selection in far fromequilibrium systems.” 2011. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Obeid DN. Noisy Stabilized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky: A modelfor studying state selection in far fromequilibrium systems. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brown University; 2011. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:11168/.

Council of Science Editors:

Obeid DN. Noisy Stabilized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky: A modelfor studying state selection in far fromequilibrium systems. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brown University; 2011. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:11168/

3. Dong, Ankun. Single-molecule Nanoscopy of RNA Polymerase II Transcription at a Single Gene in Live Cells.

Degree: Department of Physics, 2017, Brown University

Single-molecule approaches enable us to follow the movement, interactions and conformational dynamics of individual molecules in real-time, thus providing novel insights in complex biochemical systems that have remained masked in the ensemble averaging of traditional bulk biochemical approaches. Recent advances in single-molecule tracking, fluorescence spectroscopy and subdiffraction optical microscopy have unveiled unprecedented views of molecular processes in live cells. To extract quantitative information from individual molecules in the high background noise, these techniques are often based on in vitro reconstituted systems with either surface-immobilized or freely-diffusing biomolecules in dilute conditions. Live cell, real-time imaging, tracking and counting biomolecules in their native, crowded intracellular environment currently remain an extremely challenging task. Based on the numerical simulation, I built the real time tracking 3D STED nanoscopy enabling single molecule detection. With the new technique, I perform oligo-nucleotide hybridization detection experiment in vitro as well as study the mechanism of RNA Polymerase II transcription in living cells at single molecule level. Basically, I reveal the accumulation of Pol II molecules and quantified nearly 10 Pol II molecules in the cluster during active transcription at a tagged mini-gene in the native environment. In addition, mini-gene transcription does not involve transient Pol II clustering at pre-initiation by kinetic analysis enabled by target-locking overVII multiple transcription rounds, arguing against the persistence of accumulated Pol IIs in the absence of transcription or extensive Pol II recycling-related spatial compartmentalization. What’s more, I find that single Pol II molecules are stochastically recruited from the nucleoplasm, enter into productive elongation and are predominantly released instead of recycled upon termination. The results set up a quantitative framework for investigating Pol II dynamics at single genes at single molecule level, and also demonstrate that the potential and powerful use of real time tracking 3D STED nanoscopy in elucidating the complex biological mechanisms in vivo. Advisors/Committee Members: Ling, Xinsheng Sean (Advisor), Kosterlitz, J. Michael (Reader), Diebold, Gerald J. (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Molecular biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dong, A. (2017). Single-molecule Nanoscopy of RNA Polymerase II Transcription at a Single Gene in Live Cells. (Thesis). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:733314/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dong, Ankun. “Single-molecule Nanoscopy of RNA Polymerase II Transcription at a Single Gene in Live Cells.” 2017. Thesis, Brown University. Accessed February 21, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:733314/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dong, Ankun. “Single-molecule Nanoscopy of RNA Polymerase II Transcription at a Single Gene in Live Cells.” 2017. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Dong A. Single-molecule Nanoscopy of RNA Polymerase II Transcription at a Single Gene in Live Cells. [Internet] [Thesis]. Brown University; 2017. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:733314/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Dong A. Single-molecule Nanoscopy of RNA Polymerase II Transcription at a Single Gene in Live Cells. [Thesis]. Brown University; 2017. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:733314/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.