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You searched for +publisher:"Brown University" +contributor:("Golub, Spencer"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Faingersh, Ksenia Keren. Performing Communist Myths: the Afterlife of an Orphaned Myth.

Degree: PhD, Slavic Studies, 2014, Brown University

Abstract of Performing The Communist Myths: The Afterlife Of An Orphaned Myth by Ksenia Keren Faingersh, Ph.D., Brown University, May 2014 This thesis explores the “afterlife” of the various Soviet ideological and historical myths, which have succeeded to adapt when placed within a different socio-political frame of post-Soviet Russia. In the beginning of Perestroika, the orphaned myths have been persecuted, dethroned and trampled down; the crisis of the 90s breathed new life into them, providing ground for their renewed relevance and fortification. The analysis is narrowed down to several of the most prominent iconic myths – the quintessential myths of identity: the myth of Lenin, the myth of Stalin, the myth of Pavlik Morozov. Treating the mythical structure at the level of the sign (resorting to structuralist linguistics), the dissertation examines the different modes and patterns of rejuvenation & reincarnation of myth, the tactics of survival. Each of the three iconic Soviet myths examined in this thesis illustrates a different kind of myth – the “ultimate signifier myth” of Lenin, the “eternal signified myth” of Stalin and the “archetypal, symbolic myth” of Pavlik Morozov: each has its unique mechanism of survival in the post-Soviet space. Additionally, this thesis demonstrates that – however different structurally - each of the different myths uses performativity (rigorously linked to a state of liminality) as a means of survival and reproduction. This dissertation, thus, focuses mainly on contemporary plays (of the 90s and the 2000s) and theatrical productions that reveal performative potentials of the orphaned Soviet myths by disassembling and reassembling them in the post-1989 political space. Advisors/Committee Members: Oklot, Michal (Director), Levitsky, Alexander (Reader), Golub, Spencer (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: orphaned myth

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Faingersh, K. K. (2014). Performing Communist Myths: the Afterlife of an Orphaned Myth. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386330/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Faingersh, Ksenia Keren. “Performing Communist Myths: the Afterlife of an Orphaned Myth.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Brown University. Accessed February 17, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386330/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Faingersh, Ksenia Keren. “Performing Communist Myths: the Afterlife of an Orphaned Myth.” 2014. Web. 17 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Faingersh KK. Performing Communist Myths: the Afterlife of an Orphaned Myth. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brown University; 2014. [cited 2019 Feb 17]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386330/.

Council of Science Editors:

Faingersh KK. Performing Communist Myths: the Afterlife of an Orphaned Myth. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brown University; 2014. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386330/

2. Vermy, Hans R. The Live and the Life-Like: Theatre, Performance, Animation.

Degree: PhD, Theatre Arts and Performance Studies, 2014, Brown University

The Live and the Life-Like: Theater, Performance, Animation explores intersections of stage and screen as it seeks to reveal the laboring, performing body across aesthetic media and practice. With the coming of the digital revolution, screens have become a contested site of sensory experience, exponentially blurring the gap between embodiment and the screen, the live and the life-like, theater and animation. I argue that inserting a theater history alongside media studies will help to expose entanglements and connections between the laboring and virtual body, while offering potential new sites from which to articulate or dismantle the distinctions between theater and media. By inserting and insisting upon a rigorous theatre history and performance studies lens within the critical methodology of media archeology, my project questions the material distinctions between media and theater and seeks out alternate histories and forgotten disciplinary delineations within abandoned, cartoon-ish, and ephemeral technologies. I trace contemporary, video-based performance artists, and theatrical plays as they incorporate and question shifts in media and embodiment, examining embodied stagings of the art and labor of animation as well as cinematic animations that seek to highlight their theatrical and performance work. Why focus on animation and not the screen, code, or interface of the digital age? I argue that, as the cartoon, animation has long been situated as a theatrical counterpart to photographically based cinema. Individual chapters break down the matters of media, theatre, and performance to questions of technology, examining how themes of movement, light, animality, and world making intersect with performing bodies across stage and screen alike. Thus my project combines theatre and media studies to expose laboring bodies in animations and performances across and beyond such distinctions as the live and the life-like. Advisors/Committee Members: Golub, Spencer (Director), Schneider, Rebecca (Reader), Winkler, Todd (Reader), Koch, Gertrud (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: animation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vermy, H. R. (2014). The Live and the Life-Like: Theatre, Performance, Animation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386334/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vermy, Hans R. “The Live and the Life-Like: Theatre, Performance, Animation.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Brown University. Accessed February 17, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386334/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vermy, Hans R. “The Live and the Life-Like: Theatre, Performance, Animation.” 2014. Web. 17 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Vermy HR. The Live and the Life-Like: Theatre, Performance, Animation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brown University; 2014. [cited 2019 Feb 17]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386334/.

Council of Science Editors:

Vermy HR. The Live and the Life-Like: Theatre, Performance, Animation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brown University; 2014. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:386334/

3. Camp, John P. Le Premier Cadre: Theatre Architecture and Objects of Knowledge in Eighteenth-Century France.

Degree: PhD, Theatre Studies, 2008, Brown University

Theatre architecture reform in the second half of the eighteenth century in France shows the cross-infiltration of philosophical and scientific discourses with those generated by architects, playwrights and dramaturgs. The architect Claude-Nicolas Ledoux's Théâtre de Besançon, which explicitly takes the anatomy of the eye as a model, suggests that, by the time of the Revolution, it had become possible to conjugate human anatomy with an epistemological function thought to operate within theatre buildings. This dissertation presents the history of theatre architecture reform with particular attention to the influence of empiricist philosophy and optical science in the designs and essays produced by architects and amateurs between 1748 and 1785. Besides examining work by such figures as Pierre Patte, Victor Louis, Charles de Wailly and Claude-Nicolas Ledoux, I describe changes in dramatic theory and architectural designs during the eighteenth century, as well as the advent of popular experimental physics lecture demonstrations in order to explore the use of rehearsal protocols and spectatorial practices in the production of scientific knowledge. The dissertation pays particular attention to developments in science whose discourses tend to coagulate around Enlightenment era architectural theory and practice: natural philosophy, theories of perception, anatomy, physiology and optics. Though it focuses primarily on theatre architecture, this study concludes that theatre practice can be understood as a set of representational practices whose reciprocal dependency on philosophy is legible in architectural designs, visual culture and accounts of spectatorship in mid-eighteenth-century France. Advisors/Committee Members: Golub, Spencer (director), Schneider, Rebecca (reader), Ravel, Jeffrey (reader).

Subjects/Keywords: theatre architecture

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Camp, J. P. (2008). Le Premier Cadre: Theatre Architecture and Objects of Knowledge in Eighteenth-Century France. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:18/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Camp, John P. “Le Premier Cadre: Theatre Architecture and Objects of Knowledge in Eighteenth-Century France.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Brown University. Accessed February 17, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:18/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Camp, John P. “Le Premier Cadre: Theatre Architecture and Objects of Knowledge in Eighteenth-Century France.” 2008. Web. 17 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Camp JP. Le Premier Cadre: Theatre Architecture and Objects of Knowledge in Eighteenth-Century France. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brown University; 2008. [cited 2019 Feb 17]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:18/.

Council of Science Editors:

Camp JP. Le Premier Cadre: Theatre Architecture and Objects of Knowledge in Eighteenth-Century France. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brown University; 2008. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:18/

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