Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Brown University" +contributor:("Dawson, Michelle"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Parsons, Adrienne Marie. The Influence of Donor Variability and Medical History on Human Stromal Vascular Fraction Regenerative Potential.

Degree: Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology and Biotechnology, 2017, Brown University

The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) is a heterogeneous population of cells that resides in adipose tissue. It includes adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), which work synergistically with the other cell types to enhance tissue healing and regeneration. This makes SVF an attractive therapeutic option for autologous applications in regenerative medicine. However, inherent variability in SVF therapeutic potential from one patient to another, perhaps due to unique medical histories, hinders the ability to predict clinical outcomes for any one person. This study used a series of analyses to examine the regenerative and immunomodulatory properties of a large, medically diverse population of human donors. Using fifteen primary tissue samples, the SVF of adipose was assessed for yield, viability, self-renewal capacity, proliferation, differentiation potential, and immunomodulatory activity. These data were then analyzed to identify trends that may exist between therapeutic parameters. Results from this study indicated that SVF cells had variable therapeutic potential. Nonexpanded SVF exhibited robust osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation, but limited chondrogenic differentiation. Each of the SVF samples also increased expression of four pro-inflammatory cytokines. Correlation analyses of therapeutic parameters identified inverse relationships between self-renewal capacity and differentiation potential, and a positive relationship between osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential. Additionally, expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein (MCP)-1 were positively correlated, and there was a negative trend observed between donor age and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Additionally, a previous diagnosis of breast cancer was associated with increased self-renewal capacity and a trend of decreased differentiation potential. The results of this study illustrate that donor variability and medical history influence therapeutic capacities of autologous SVF cells. This study may be useful in developing standardized assays to assess regenerative potential, and the relationships observed may be beneficial for prognostic purposes in clinical settings. Advisors/Committee Members: Darling, Eric (Advisor), Dawson, Michelle (Reader), Ciombor, Deborah (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Mesenchymal stem cells

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Parsons, A. M. (2017). The Influence of Donor Variability and Medical History on Human Stromal Vascular Fraction Regenerative Potential. (Thesis). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:733470/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Parsons, Adrienne Marie. “The Influence of Donor Variability and Medical History on Human Stromal Vascular Fraction Regenerative Potential.” 2017. Thesis, Brown University. Accessed March 22, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:733470/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Parsons, Adrienne Marie. “The Influence of Donor Variability and Medical History on Human Stromal Vascular Fraction Regenerative Potential.” 2017. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Parsons AM. The Influence of Donor Variability and Medical History on Human Stromal Vascular Fraction Regenerative Potential. [Internet] [Thesis]. Brown University; 2017. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:733470/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Parsons AM. The Influence of Donor Variability and Medical History on Human Stromal Vascular Fraction Regenerative Potential. [Thesis]. Brown University; 2017. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:733470/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Irofuala, Chinedu. Cardiac Differentiation Potential is Modulated by Genetic Background: Implications for Personalized Medicine.

Degree: Biomedical Engineering, 2018, Brown University

Cardiovascular diseases are some of the most common and most lethal diseases in the world. On top of that, the only treatment option available that would allow for cardiovascular function to be restored to healthy levels long-term is a heart transplant. Not only are heart transplants difficult to come by – the waiting list is almost double the number of hearts available each year – but even this solution may require life-long immunosuppressant and drug use. By instead using regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, it is possible to create innovative solutions using human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes that may create a pathway towards restoring functionality to damaged hearts. Furthermore, these cardiomyocytes can be used to perform extensive cardiotoxicity testing in human cells, providing a more accurate and appropriate medium for assessing the implications of new drugs heading to market, as well as how a patient’s heart may react to a prescribed drug regimen. Currently, one of the largest barriers to these fields of research is the large number of pure cardiomyocytes that must be produced to meet the demands of academia and industry. This is the motivation behind the work presented here, which aims to optimize the cardiomyocyte differentiation process of the GiPSC, NCRM-5, and WTC-11 human induced pluripotent stem cell lines by altering seeding density and Chiron concentration. It is shown that high seeding density (137,000 cells per well) and low Chiron (3 µM) concentration produce the highest purity cardiomyocytes regardless of lineage, but that the level of purity is dictated by the genetic background of the cell type. As tissue engineering and regenerative medicine move closer to personalized medicine approaches, it becomes increasingly important to understand the implications of genetics in determining the differentiation potential of a patient’s own induced pluripotent stem cells for therapy and treatment purposes. Advisors/Committee Members: Coulombe, Kareen (Advisor), Shukla, Anita (Reader), Dawson, Michelle (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Cell differentiation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Irofuala, C. (2018). Cardiac Differentiation Potential is Modulated by Genetic Background: Implications for Personalized Medicine. (Thesis). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792817/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Irofuala, Chinedu. “Cardiac Differentiation Potential is Modulated by Genetic Background: Implications for Personalized Medicine.” 2018. Thesis, Brown University. Accessed March 22, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792817/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Irofuala, Chinedu. “Cardiac Differentiation Potential is Modulated by Genetic Background: Implications for Personalized Medicine.” 2018. Web. 22 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Irofuala C. Cardiac Differentiation Potential is Modulated by Genetic Background: Implications for Personalized Medicine. [Internet] [Thesis]. Brown University; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 22]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792817/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Irofuala C. Cardiac Differentiation Potential is Modulated by Genetic Background: Implications for Personalized Medicine. [Thesis]. Brown University; 2018. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:792817/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.