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You searched for +publisher:"Brown University" +contributor:("Chun, Wendy Hui Kyong"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Bering-Porter, David. Undead: Bodies and Codes of Uncanny Vitality in the Media of Late Capitalism.

Degree: PhD, Modern Culture and Media, 2011, Brown University

This dissertation examines the shifts in reproduction, knowledge, and power that remap our notion of "life" in contemporary scientific and popular cultures through the uncanny vitality of the undead. The objects of this study move from the zombie in Haitian myth and American cinema to the recessive trait in the history of genetics and the way in which the body is mediated as a "natural" object and a sovereign entity. The body has always been the site for mediation, particularly for markers of identity such as race, gender, and self-improvement and my dissertation looks at the ways in which these symbolic markers work on screen, around the body, and in the flesh. This project situates itself in relation to recent scholarship that examines the way that technology permeates and reframes the body, changing it from a "natural" and sovereign object to the subject of information, mediation, and exchange. I use the term "uncanny vitality" to designate a kind of excessive life that belongs not only to representations of the zombie in cinema but also to a remapping of "life" itself that exceeds the boundaries of the individual as we see in the distributed identities that form within the context of both new media the life sciences. I argue that the body belongs to an important media history that can be traced from the enslaved body of the African Diaspora, continuing through the screened body of cinema, to the present day as technologies further instrumentalize the body as a source of value, labor, and resources. Beginning from a point of intersection between media technology and the body allows me to draw from a diverse range of objects and approaches to answer questions concerning the shifting status of the human subject. Advisors/Committee Members: Rosen, Philip (Director), Doane, Mary Ann (Reader), Chun, Wendy Hui Kyong (Reader), Chow, Rey (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Film Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bering-Porter, D. (2011). Undead: Bodies and Codes of Uncanny Vitality in the Media of Late Capitalism. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:11344/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bering-Porter, David. “Undead: Bodies and Codes of Uncanny Vitality in the Media of Late Capitalism.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Brown University. Accessed October 21, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:11344/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bering-Porter, David. “Undead: Bodies and Codes of Uncanny Vitality in the Media of Late Capitalism.” 2011. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bering-Porter D. Undead: Bodies and Codes of Uncanny Vitality in the Media of Late Capitalism. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brown University; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:11344/.

Council of Science Editors:

Bering-Porter D. Undead: Bodies and Codes of Uncanny Vitality in the Media of Late Capitalism. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brown University; 2011. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:11344/

2. Rangan, Pooja Girish. Automatic Ethnography: Otherness, Indexicality, and Humanitarian Visual Media.

Degree: PhD, Modern Culture and Media, 2012, Brown University

My dissertation examines contemporary humanitarian media empowerment initiatives, arguing that their interventionist rhetorical strategies further exoticize their marginalized beneficiaries by mobilizing their alterity as a sign of agency. Treating ethnography as a technological, historical, and theoretical frame, I survey projects in which visual media are literally "handed over" as a humanizing prosthesis to various dehumanized subjects (ranging from the children of Third World sex-workers in India, and elephants employed as draft animals in Asian logging industries, to U.S. citizens dispossessed by Hurricane Katrina) as a means of immediate self-empowerment. I argue that the ideology of immediacy through which humanitarian projects envision their ethical task prevents them from accounting for the actual effects of media representations. Frequently adopted by advocates of self-empowerment through media, the benevolent language of autonomy and reflexivity conceals an exploitative cultural logic that is characterized by certain unexamined assumptions about visual media: to authenticate their authorial control, the subjects of such participatory projects are often required to actively and entrepreneurially reify their status and situations as "other" by drawing on the rhetorical tropes of directness, transparency, presence, and indexicality. Since their creative production is pre-mediated in advance by the ethnocentric connotations of these tropes, I contend that the beneficiaries of media empowerment are regularly harnessed to replenish the humanitarian archive with updated visual "evidence" of otherness, with the noble savage recast as the obedient child, the dignified animal, and the resourceful refugee. Advisors/Committee Members: Chow, Rey (Director), Doane, Mary Ann (Reader), Chun, Wendy Hui Kyong (Reader).

Subjects/Keywords: Ethnography

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rangan, P. G. (2012). Automatic Ethnography: Otherness, Indexicality, and Humanitarian Visual Media. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:297681/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rangan, Pooja Girish. “Automatic Ethnography: Otherness, Indexicality, and Humanitarian Visual Media.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Brown University. Accessed October 21, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:297681/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rangan, Pooja Girish. “Automatic Ethnography: Otherness, Indexicality, and Humanitarian Visual Media.” 2012. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Rangan PG. Automatic Ethnography: Otherness, Indexicality, and Humanitarian Visual Media. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brown University; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:297681/.

Council of Science Editors:

Rangan PG. Automatic Ethnography: Otherness, Indexicality, and Humanitarian Visual Media. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brown University; 2012. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:297681/

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