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You searched for +publisher:"Bowling Green State University" +contributor:("Dilley, Laura"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Bowling Green State University

1. Raybourn, Tracey L. Nonlinguistic Pitch and Timing Patterns in Word Segmentation.

Degree: MA, Psychology/Experimental, 2010, Bowling Green State University

How listeners locate word boundaries in fluent speech is a nontrivial problem.Traditionally, acoustic-phonetic information local to the point of segmentation has beenconsidered most relevant to the question. Relatively little work has investigated acoustic cuesdistal (non-local) to the segmentation locus. Recently, however, Dilley and McAuley (2008)showed distal prosodic context effects on the perception of proximal (i.e., local) word boundariesusing eight-syllable word strings (e.g. channel dizzy foot note book worm). The present worktested a variation of the former study by replacing the initial five syllables with five complextones, which maintained the pitch and timing structures of original sequences; motivation for thisexperiment comes from a sizable literature concerned with the perceptual organization ofnonlinguistic acoustic signals. It was hypothesized that the (nonlinguistic) acoustic structure ofthe distal context would influence the rate at which participants reported hearing disyllabic finalwords. Results generally showed null effects, suggesting that the perceptual system may onlyutilize distal pitch and timing information as it occurs within the structure of speech itself.Contrary to the assumptions of this thesis, the present results may support a view of speechperception in which the auditory system processes speech in a manner distinct from non-speechacoustic signals. Advisors/Committee Members: Dilley, Laura (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology; word segmentation; music perception; prosody; rhythm

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Raybourn, T. L. (2010). Nonlinguistic Pitch and Timing Patterns in Word Segmentation. (Masters Thesis). Bowling Green State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1276859442

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Raybourn, Tracey L. “Nonlinguistic Pitch and Timing Patterns in Word Segmentation.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Bowling Green State University. Accessed August 10, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1276859442.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Raybourn, Tracey L. “Nonlinguistic Pitch and Timing Patterns in Word Segmentation.” 2010. Web. 10 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Raybourn TL. Nonlinguistic Pitch and Timing Patterns in Word Segmentation. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Bowling Green State University; 2010. [cited 2020 Aug 10]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1276859442.

Council of Science Editors:

Raybourn TL. Nonlinguistic Pitch and Timing Patterns in Word Segmentation. [Masters Thesis]. Bowling Green State University; 2010. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1276859442

2. Banzina, Elina. The Role of Secondary-stressed and Unstressed-unreduced Syllables in Word Recognition: Acoustic and Perceptual Studies with Russian Learners of English.

Degree: PhD, Communication Disorders, 2012, Bowling Green State University

Identifying those phonological factors that native listeners rely on most when perceiving non-native speech is critical for setting priorities in pronunciation instruction. The importance of accurate lexical stress production, particularly primary stress, has been explored. However, little is known about the role of Secondary-stressed (SS) syllables and Unstressed-unreduced (UU) syllables, and the importance of their accuracy for speech perception. These questions are of relevance for Russian learners of English, who often reduce English SS and UU vowels—a phenomenon which is arguably due to the fact that only one stressed syllable per word is allowed in Russian phonology. Moreover, second language research has not addressed the issue of vowel over-reduction, which is a pattern typical of Russian learners. Low-accuracy productions of SS and UU syllables are generally not expected to lead to unintelligibility; however, they might interfere with the ease and accuracy with which speech is perceived. An acoustic study first compared realization of SS and UU syllables in words produced in isolation by six Russian learners of English and six native English speakers. Words were selected to contain low vowels and specific UU and SS syllable positions to optimally reflect vowel reduction by Russian speakers. Acoustic analyses revealed significant vowel quality and duration reductions in Russian-spoken SS and UU vowels, which were only half the duration of native English productions and significantly centralized. A subsequent psycholinguistic perceptual study investigated the degree of interference that inaccurate productions of SS and UU syllables have on native listeners’ speech processing. A cross-modal phonological priming technique combined with a lexical decision task assessed speech processing of 28 native English speakers as they listened to (1) native English speech, (2) unmodified Russian speech, and (3) modified Russian speech with SS and UU syllables altered to match native productions. Unmodified UU vowels led to significant inhibition of lexical access, while unmodified SS vowels revealed less of such interference. Acoustically “improving” vowel quality and duration in UU and SS syllables greatly facilitated word recognition only for UU-syllable-containing words. A recommendation is made that UU syllables are incorporated into pronunciation instruction for Russian learners of English. Advisors/Committee Members: Hewitt, Lynne (Committee Chair), Dilley, Laura (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: English As A Second Language; Linguistics; secondary-stressed syllables; unstressed-unreduced syllables; Russian learners of English as a second language; lexical stress; vowel reduction; word recognition; speech processing; intelligibility; pronunciation instruction

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Banzina, E. (2012). The Role of Secondary-stressed and Unstressed-unreduced Syllables in Word Recognition: Acoustic and Perceptual Studies with Russian Learners of English. (Doctoral Dissertation). Bowling Green State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1340114580

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Banzina, Elina. “The Role of Secondary-stressed and Unstressed-unreduced Syllables in Word Recognition: Acoustic and Perceptual Studies with Russian Learners of English.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Bowling Green State University. Accessed August 10, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1340114580.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Banzina, Elina. “The Role of Secondary-stressed and Unstressed-unreduced Syllables in Word Recognition: Acoustic and Perceptual Studies with Russian Learners of English.” 2012. Web. 10 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Banzina E. The Role of Secondary-stressed and Unstressed-unreduced Syllables in Word Recognition: Acoustic and Perceptual Studies with Russian Learners of English. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Bowling Green State University; 2012. [cited 2020 Aug 10]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1340114580.

Council of Science Editors:

Banzina E. The Role of Secondary-stressed and Unstressed-unreduced Syllables in Word Recognition: Acoustic and Perceptual Studies with Russian Learners of English. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Bowling Green State University; 2012. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1340114580

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