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You searched for +publisher:"Boston College" +contributor:("Lauren Saenz"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Johnson, Clair Marie. Power and Participation: Relationships among Evaluator Identities, Evaluation Models, and Stakeholder Involvement.

Degree: PhD, Educational Research, Measurement and Evaluation, 2015, Boston College

Stakeholder involvement is widely acknowledged to be an important aspect of program evaluation (Mertens, 2007; Greene, 2005a; Brandon, 1998). However, limited work has been done to empirically study evaluators’ practices of stakeholder involvement and ways in which stakeholder involvement is affected or guided by various factors. As evaluators interact with and place value on the input of stakeholders, social, cultural, and historical backgrounds will always be infused into the context (Mertens & Wilson, 2012; MacNeil, 2005). The field of evaluation has done little to critically examine how such contexts impact evaluators’ perceptions of stakeholders and their involvement. The present study attempts to fill these gaps, focusing specifically on the relationships among evaluator identities and characteristics, evaluation models, and stakeholder involvement. Using the frameworks of critical evaluation theory (Freeman & Vasconcelos, 2010) and a theory of capital (Bourdieu, 1986), the present study utilized a sequential explanatory mixed methods approach. A sample of 272 practicing program evaluators from the United States and Canada provided quantitative survey data, while a sample of nine evaluators provided focus group and interview data. Regression analyses and thematic content analyses were conducted. Findings from the quantitative strand included relationships between: (1) measures of individualism-collectivism and stakeholder involvement outcomes, (2) contextual evaluation variables and stakeholder involvement outcomes, (3) use of use, values or social justice branch evaluation models and stakeholder involvement outcomes, and (4) whether the evaluator identified as a person of color and the diversity of involved stakeholders. Findings from the qualitative strand demonstrated the role of dominant frameworks of evaluation serving to perpetuate systems of power. Participating evaluators revealed ways in which they feel and experience systems of power acting on them, including participation in, recognition of, and responses to oppression. The qualitative strand showed that evaluation models may be used to help recognize power dynamics, but that they are also used to reinforce existing power dynamics. Implications and recommended directions for future research are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Lauren Saenz (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: evaluation; power; program evaluation; stakeholder engagement; stakeholder involvement; stakeholders

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, C. M. (2015). Power and Participation: Relationships among Evaluator Identities, Evaluation Models, and Stakeholder Involvement. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston College. Retrieved from http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:104710

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Clair Marie. “Power and Participation: Relationships among Evaluator Identities, Evaluation Models, and Stakeholder Involvement.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston College. Accessed August 23, 2019. http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:104710.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Clair Marie. “Power and Participation: Relationships among Evaluator Identities, Evaluation Models, and Stakeholder Involvement.” 2015. Web. 23 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Johnson CM. Power and Participation: Relationships among Evaluator Identities, Evaluation Models, and Stakeholder Involvement. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston College; 2015. [cited 2019 Aug 23]. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:104710.

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson CM. Power and Participation: Relationships among Evaluator Identities, Evaluation Models, and Stakeholder Involvement. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston College; 2015. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:104710


Boston College

2. Rollison, Julia. Methodological Decision-Making in Evaluation: An Examination of Implications of Using a Stage of Change Outcome Variable.

Degree: PhD, Educational Research, Measurement and Evaluation, 2014, Boston College

Methods for classifying and treating an outcome variable are critical to explore in health research and evaluation, given the potential impact the choice of method may have on the findings and subsequent recommendations (Merbitz, Morris, & Grip, 1989). Further, given the prominent application of the Transtheoretical Model in health research, the stages of change construct continues to be a critical outcome measure concept used in various applied evaluation studies (Bridle et al., 2005; Nigg, 2002; Prochaska, DiClemente, & Norcross, 1992). The purpose of this dissertation study was to determine if findings differ depending on the approach to categorizing and analyzing a stage of change outcome variable, and if so, to highlight how these may affect policy and programmatic decision-making. Using data from a study on evidence-based program adoption decisions, this dissertation examined five approaches to treating and analyzing a single Decision to Adopt outcome variable. These different approaches were compared from both a methodological and pragmatic perspective. Hypothetical stakeholder illustrations were used to highlight differences in decision-making priorities and use of findings based on role, background, and organizational priorities. In comparing methods for classifying and treating the stage of change outcome variable, findings revealed notable differences in effect size, estimation, implication of major findings, and limitations of approach. The hypothetical stakeholder illustrations stressed the significance of personal values and preferences as key influential factors in decision-making and use of evaluation results. This dissertation highlighted how decisions are inextricably linked to the logic model and underlying theory, particularly as it relates to defining evaluation questions, determining how to categorize constructs, and assigning value to codes. Further, it reinforces the significance of contextual considerations in evaluation and how these cannot be ignored in the decision-making process (e.g., budgetary limitations, practical constraints, political factors). The proposed directions for future research seek to continue advancing this understanding of the impact of methodological decisions in different contexts and help improve the utility of evaluations more broadly. Advisors/Committee Members: Lauren Saenz (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Decision to adopt; Measurement; Methodological decision-making; Program evaluation; Stage of change; Variable treatment

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rollison, J. (2014). Methodological Decision-Making in Evaluation: An Examination of Implications of Using a Stage of Change Outcome Variable. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston College. Retrieved from http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:103736

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rollison, Julia. “Methodological Decision-Making in Evaluation: An Examination of Implications of Using a Stage of Change Outcome Variable.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston College. Accessed August 23, 2019. http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:103736.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rollison, Julia. “Methodological Decision-Making in Evaluation: An Examination of Implications of Using a Stage of Change Outcome Variable.” 2014. Web. 23 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Rollison J. Methodological Decision-Making in Evaluation: An Examination of Implications of Using a Stage of Change Outcome Variable. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston College; 2014. [cited 2019 Aug 23]. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:103736.

Council of Science Editors:

Rollison J. Methodological Decision-Making in Evaluation: An Examination of Implications of Using a Stage of Change Outcome Variable. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston College; 2014. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:103736

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