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You searched for +publisher:"Boston College" +contributor:("Judith A. Vessey"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Boston College

1. DiFazio, Rachel Lee. Patient-Centered Outcomes of Orthopaedic Surgeries in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

Degree: PhD, Nursing, 2013, Boston College

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to elucidate changes in parents' perceptions of health related quality of life (HRQOL), functional status, and caregiver burden in children with severe cerebral palsy (CP) following extensive orthopedic surgery and to determine the amount of nonmedical out-of-pocket expenses (NOOPEs) incurred during hospitalization. Background: CP is the most common cause of childhood physical disability. Children with severe non-ambulatory CP have multiple complex medical problems and frequently develop hip dislocations and neuromuscular scoliosis; these require extensive orthopaedic surgical interventions to prevent progression. The surgical trajectory is costly, resource intensive, and complications are common. Decision-making needs to extend beyond anticipated physical and radiographic improvements to include patient-centered outcomes including HRQOL, functional status, caregiver impact, and financial burden. Currently, research on this second group of outcomes does not exist. Methods: A single group prospective cohort study (N=48) design was used to measure changes pre- and post- surgery. NOOPEs were collected on a daily basis from parents during their child's hospitalization. A linear mixed-model regression analysis for longitudinal data, incorporating serial patient measurements over one year, was used to assess changes in HRQOL, functional status, and caregiver impact using measures normed for this population (i.e., CPCHILD, ACEND). NOOPEs were calculated using descriptive statistics. Results: Significant declines in HRQOL and functional status were noted at six weeks post-operative with return to baseline at three months. Long-term significant (p = .005) improvements, however, were noted beginning at six months. Caregiver impact did not change significantly over time. The total NOOPEs for the inpatient ranged from 59.00-6977.50 (Median = 479.30) with 1971.5 missed hours from work. Conclusion: Children with severe CP who undergo extensive orthopaedic surgery and their families experience improvements across a variety of patient-centered outcomes in the long-term following surgery. Nursing has a critical role in assisting families in decision-making around surgery and providing anticipatory guidance and support. Advisors/Committee Members: Judith A. Vessey (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Cerebral Palsy; Patient-Centered Outcomes; Pediatrics; Surgery

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

DiFazio, R. L. (2013). Patient-Centered Outcomes of Orthopaedic Surgeries in Children with Cerebral Palsy. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston College. Retrieved from http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101621

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

DiFazio, Rachel Lee. “Patient-Centered Outcomes of Orthopaedic Surgeries in Children with Cerebral Palsy.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston College. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101621.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

DiFazio, Rachel Lee. “Patient-Centered Outcomes of Orthopaedic Surgeries in Children with Cerebral Palsy.” 2013. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

DiFazio RL. Patient-Centered Outcomes of Orthopaedic Surgeries in Children with Cerebral Palsy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston College; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101621.

Council of Science Editors:

DiFazio RL. Patient-Centered Outcomes of Orthopaedic Surgeries in Children with Cerebral Palsy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston College; 2013. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101621


Boston College

2. Duffy, Lisa. Testing the Efficacy of the Creating Opportunities for Parent Empowerment (COPE) Intervention During Hospital to Home Transition: Empowering Parents of Children with Epilepsy and Other Neurological Conditions.

Degree: PhD, Nursing, 2013, Boston College

Background: Parents of children with epilepsy and other neurological conditions live with a feeling of constant uncertainty. The uncertainty associated with caring for a child with epilepsy and other neurological conditions produces stress, which leads to decreased parental belief in caregiving skills, anxiety, and depression, ultimately altering parental functioning resulting in an increase in child behavioral problems. The stress associated with caring for a child with epilepsy and other neurological conditions is unlike caring for children with other chronic conditions. Epilepsy and other neurological conditions are unpredictable and there are often no warning signs prior to an acute event. This unpredictability accompanied with stigma results in social isolation and impacts family functioning. In addition, children with epilepsy have a higher rate of psychological co-morbidities and behavior problems when compared to children with other chronic conditions. This produces an additional burden on the parents and family. Study Design: This randomized controlled trial tested the efficacy of the COPE intervention for parents of children with epilepsy and other neurological conditions. This intervention was administered at three intervals: 1) during hospital admission in writing and by audiotape, MP3 download, or Podcast; 2) three days following hospital discharge by telephone; and 3) four to six weeks after hospital discharge in writing and by audiotape, MP3 download, or Podcast. Results: Forty-six parents of children admitted to the inpatient neuroscience unit at Boston Children's Hospital participated in the study. Several study limitations resulted in an inadequate sample size to obtain the power necessary to reach statistically significant results for a majority of the research questions. A one-between, one-within multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) revealed that the main effect of time was significant for differences in state anxiety for both the Usual Care Group and the Intervention Group, F, (1, 20) = 9.86, p = .005, indicating that state anxiety for both groups combined was more pronounced during the hospitalization. A one-between, one-within MANOVA demonstrated that the effect of the interaction between time and group was significant for internalized behavior assessment system score only (p=.037) as the Usual Care Group reported a significant decrease in internalizing behavior scores in their children over time. Conclusions: Findings from this study have significant implications for clinical practice and future research. Parents of children with neurological conditions often struggle to manage a constant feeling of uncertainty in their daily lives. Nurses possess the knowledge and expertise necessary to identify the psychosocial needs of these parents and provide education and support as needed. Future research should focus on designing interventions to meet the needs of these families and develop strategies to help improve the quality of life for both the parent and child living with a neurological… Advisors/Committee Members: Judith A. Vessey (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Parents of children with epilepsy; Pediatric epilepsy; Nursing; Coping

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Duffy, L. (2013). Testing the Efficacy of the Creating Opportunities for Parent Empowerment (COPE) Intervention During Hospital to Home Transition: Empowering Parents of Children with Epilepsy and Other Neurological Conditions. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston College. Retrieved from http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101323

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Duffy, Lisa. “Testing the Efficacy of the Creating Opportunities for Parent Empowerment (COPE) Intervention During Hospital to Home Transition: Empowering Parents of Children with Epilepsy and Other Neurological Conditions.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston College. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101323.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Duffy, Lisa. “Testing the Efficacy of the Creating Opportunities for Parent Empowerment (COPE) Intervention During Hospital to Home Transition: Empowering Parents of Children with Epilepsy and Other Neurological Conditions.” 2013. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Duffy L. Testing the Efficacy of the Creating Opportunities for Parent Empowerment (COPE) Intervention During Hospital to Home Transition: Empowering Parents of Children with Epilepsy and Other Neurological Conditions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston College; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101323.

Council of Science Editors:

Duffy L. Testing the Efficacy of the Creating Opportunities for Parent Empowerment (COPE) Intervention During Hospital to Home Transition: Empowering Parents of Children with Epilepsy and Other Neurological Conditions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston College; 2013. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101323


Boston College

3. Liu, Yi-Hui. Translation and psychometric validation of the Chinese version of the child-adolescent teasing scale.

Degree: PhD, Nursing, 2008, Boston College

Teasing among children is pervasive; however, it has received remarkably little attention in the empirical, theoretical, or methodological literature in Taiwan. The purposes of this study were to translate and psychometrically validate the Chinese versions of the CATS (CATS-C). The purposes for this study were accomplished in two major phases. Phase I focused on translating the CATS and evaluating the psychometric equivalency of the original English and translated CATS-C. First, the CATS was translated into Chinese and semantic equivalence was determined by three different kinds of evaluations during the translation process. Then, the semantic equivalence of the translated CATS-C was empirically tested with 25 6th grade bilingual students. The results of the paired sample t-test and the Pearson correlation indicated congruence between the two versions of the CATS on the semantic equivalence. In order to evaluate each item’s relevance in Taiwanese culture, a Content Validity Index (CVI) was calculated among the ratings of the five Taiwanese elementary school teachers. The CVI was .88 for the entire CATS and were .66 to 1.0 for the four subscales. One additional item, “personal hygiene”, was included at the suggestion of the experts. ii Phase II focused on evaluating the psychometric properties of the CATS-C. The 33-item adapted CATS-C was tested on a sample of 343 4th through 6th grade Taiwanese students to determine its psychometric properties. Construct validity was assessed through PCA with Varimax rotation. Reliability was tested through the analysis of internal consistency. The results showed that five-component solution was the most appropriate and interpretable solution for the 29-item CATS-C after deleting four items. Cronbach’s alpha was .91 for the total CATS-C scale and were .73 - .83 for the five CATS-C subscales. The 29-item CATS-C with five components is a culturally appropriate instrument which has potential for determining Taiwanese students at high risk from teasing. Further studies are recommended to test the reliability and validity of the CATS-C. Advisors/Committee Members: Judith A. Vessey (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: teasing; cross-cultural research; children; questionnaire translation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Liu, Y. (2008). Translation and psychometric validation of the Chinese version of the child-adolescent teasing scale. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston College. Retrieved from http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101172

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Liu, Yi-Hui. “Translation and psychometric validation of the Chinese version of the child-adolescent teasing scale.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston College. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101172.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Liu, Yi-Hui. “Translation and psychometric validation of the Chinese version of the child-adolescent teasing scale.” 2008. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Liu Y. Translation and psychometric validation of the Chinese version of the child-adolescent teasing scale. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston College; 2008. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101172.

Council of Science Editors:

Liu Y. Translation and psychometric validation of the Chinese version of the child-adolescent teasing scale. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston College; 2008. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101172

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