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You searched for +publisher:"Boston College" +contributor:("Joseph J. Pedulla"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Boston College

1. Cannady, Matthew A. Modeling Teacher Attrition: Teacher Characteristics and Working Conditions.

Degree: PhD, Educational Research, Measurement, and Evaluation, 2011, Boston College

This paper describes the literature on teacher attrition as either focusing on the working conditions faced by beginning teachers or highlighting variations in teachers' characteristics as causes for early teacher attrition. This study uses responses to the School and Staffing Survey (SASS) along with the Teacher Follow-Up Survey (TFS) to compare these contrasting views of early teacher attrition. Two logistic regression models were constructed and their relative efficacy in explaining teacher attrition were compared using three statistical techniques; model fit characteristics (e.g. pseudo-R2, Akaike Information Criteria, Bayesian Information Criteria); a comparison of their classification effectiveness, and results from Davidson and MacKinnon's J test (1981). A final model was also constructed using the predictive elements of each of the previous models. Results suggest that the working conditions model better fits the observed data than the teacher characteristics model. The final model highlights the importance of teacher commitment and engagement in the profession in teachers' career decisions. Advisors/Committee Members: Joseph J. Pedulla (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Teacher Attrition; Teacher Induction; Teacher Turnover

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cannady, M. A. (2011). Modeling Teacher Attrition: Teacher Characteristics and Working Conditions. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston College. Retrieved from http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101297

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cannady, Matthew A. “Modeling Teacher Attrition: Teacher Characteristics and Working Conditions.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston College. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101297.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cannady, Matthew A. “Modeling Teacher Attrition: Teacher Characteristics and Working Conditions.” 2011. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Cannady MA. Modeling Teacher Attrition: Teacher Characteristics and Working Conditions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston College; 2011. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101297.

Council of Science Editors:

Cannady MA. Modeling Teacher Attrition: Teacher Characteristics and Working Conditions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston College; 2011. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101297


Boston College

2. Salomon, Yves P. Novice Teachers' Mathematics practices: Do School Demographics and Teaching Pathway Matter?.

Degree: PhD, Educational Research, Measurement, and Evaluation, 2010, Boston College

There is no question that teachers play an important role in student learning. In the last decade, researchers have shown evidence pointing to the prominence of teachers compared to other factors that are known to influence student achievement (Wright, Horn, and Sanders, 1997). They have empirically demonstrated that teacher effects are large and persist for up to four years (Kain, 1998; Mendor, Jordan, Gomez, Anderson, and Bembry, 1998; Rivers, 1999). Multiple variables are known to influence teacher quality, including teacher preparation. This dissertation explored the relationship between the teacher education pathway and teaching effectiveness. Although multiple measures of teacher effectiveness exist, this study focused on reformed instructional practices as its measure of teaching effectiveness. In teaching mathematics, in particular, constructivist-based, inquiry-oriented approaches have been shown to be more effective than traditional methods (Abbott and Fouts, 2003; Klein, Hamilton, McCaffrey, Stecher, Robyn, and Burroughs, 2000). Using two groups of novice teachers (N=22) from two preparation pathways, this observational comparative study also investigated the relationship between school composition and teaching practices. There is a large body of literature showing that urban schools serving high proportions of non-white, poor, and low performing students (Darling-Hammond, 1995; Kain and Singleton, 1996; Presley White, and Gong, 2005) tend to have higher percentages of less qualified teachers compared to their suburban counterparts. In light of this, the current study also explored the relationship between school composition and teachers' use of reformed teaching practices. The findings of this investigation indicate that the instructional practices of teachers working in the urban school district where this study was conducted were generally reformed, and did not vary based on the student demographics of the schools in which they taught. In addition, no statistically significant relationship was found between teaching pathway and teachers' instructional practices. Many similarities were found in the instructional practices of teachers from the two preparation pathways. The similarities in the teachers' instructional practices were attributed to the significant congruence in the teacher preparation programs' curriculum, requirement of clinical experience, selectivity, and the programs' explicit social justice missions. Advisors/Committee Members: Joseph J. Pedulla (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Teaching practices; Teaching effectiveness

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Salomon, Y. P. (2010). Novice Teachers' Mathematics practices: Do School Demographics and Teaching Pathway Matter?. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston College. Retrieved from http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101836

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Salomon, Yves P. “Novice Teachers' Mathematics practices: Do School Demographics and Teaching Pathway Matter?.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston College. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101836.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Salomon, Yves P. “Novice Teachers' Mathematics practices: Do School Demographics and Teaching Pathway Matter?.” 2010. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Salomon YP. Novice Teachers' Mathematics practices: Do School Demographics and Teaching Pathway Matter?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston College; 2010. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101836.

Council of Science Editors:

Salomon YP. Novice Teachers' Mathematics practices: Do School Demographics and Teaching Pathway Matter?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston College; 2010. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101836


Boston College

3. Reeves, Todd. Does Content Knowledge Matter for New Teachers?.

Degree: PhD, Educational Research, Measurement, and Evaluation, 2013, Boston College

There is considerable evidence that new teachers are ill prepared for classroom practice, including self-reported evidence collected from teachers (e.g., Levine, 2006), and statistical evidence for differences in the achievement of students with new versus more experienced teachers (Rivkin, Hanushek, and Kain, 2005). In light of the challenges encountered by new teachers (e.g., Levine, 2006), this study examined the value of different forms of teacher knowledge for teachers with different levels of experience. In particular, this study investigated the interactive relationship between teaching experience and teacher content knowledge, and student achievement in mathematics and science. In New York City, Boyd et al. (2009) linked practice-focused teacher preparation to student mathematics achievement in the first year of teaching and teacher content preparation to achievement in the second. However, other studies demonstrated interactions between teaching experience and content knowledge with different interpretations (e.g., Kukla-Acevedo, 2009; Monk, 1994). At the same time, this study examined the interactive relationship between teaching experience and teachers' pedagogical content knowledge, and student achievement. Extant models of teacher career development (Huberman, 1989; National Research Council, 2010) and how teacher education affects student achievement (e.g., Desimone, 2009) offered theoretical grounding for the study. With nationally representative samples of fourth and eighth grade U.S. students – participants in the 2011 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study – this study employed hierarchical linear modeling to address its research questions among an array of student achievement outcomes in the domains of mathematics and science. This study attempted to account for salient student, teacher, and contextual factors, and the probabilities of teachers' receipt of various teacher education "treatments" (i.e., propensity score analysis) to reduce the plausibility of selection threats to internal validity. The study found no evidence for relationships between teacher content knowledge or pedagogical content knowledge and student mathematics and science achievement in fourth and eighth grade. Furthermore, the results indicated no interactive relationships between forms of teacher knowledge and teaching experience, and student achievement in these grades/subjects. The limitations of cross-sectional, observational studies using large-scale data and directions for further research are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Joseph J. Pedulla (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: content knowledge; pedagogical content knowledge; propensity score analysis; quantitative research; secondary analysis; teaching experience

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Reeves, T. (2013). Does Content Knowledge Matter for New Teachers?. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston College. Retrieved from http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101431

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Reeves, Todd. “Does Content Knowledge Matter for New Teachers?.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston College. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101431.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Reeves, Todd. “Does Content Knowledge Matter for New Teachers?.” 2013. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Reeves T. Does Content Knowledge Matter for New Teachers?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston College; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101431.

Council of Science Editors:

Reeves T. Does Content Knowledge Matter for New Teachers?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston College; 2013. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101431

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