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You searched for +publisher:"Boston College" +contributor:("Heather Rowan-Kenyon"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Boston College

1. Masterman, Ann Katherine. Women's Doctoral Student Experiences and Degree Progress in Education versus Engineering.

Degree: PhD, Educational Leadership and Higher Education, 2014, Boston College

This study's purpose was to compare the lived experiences of doctoral women studying Education, a prototypically female field, with women studying Engineering, a prototypically male field to illustrate the phenomenon of doctoral degree progress in the two fields. Using critical feminist theory and Valian's (1999) concept of gender schemas, this study examined doctoral education culture in Education and Engineering and how these cultures influence women's doctoral student experiences and in turn their degree progress (Tong, 2009). Although women represent over 50% of doctoral student enrollment and degrees earned, gender disparities exist in Education and Engineering. Once enrolled, women are proportionally more likely to complete Education doctorates and less likely to complete Engineering doctorates (Council of Graduate Schools, 2008; Gonzales, Allum, and Sowell, 2013; Nettles and Millett, 2006). This trend is important because it implies there is something about Education and Engineering doctoral environments that make them more and less conducive for women's success, respectively (Gardner and Mendoza, 2010). This study used a qualitative interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA) approach to capture the essence of women's doctoral degree progress by interpreting the lived experiences of 10 Education and 11 Engineering doctoral women (Smith, Flowers, and Larkin, 2009). After 63 in-depth interviews and two focus groups, four themes emerged. Overall, the Education women reported fewer positive doctoral experiences and more barriers to degree progress than the Engineering women due to the funding and research assistantship structure, the faculty advisor relationship, and the department environment. Both groups of women described doctoral education culture as proactive, independent, and competitive - characteristics more consistent with masculine gender schemas. Doctoral education culture also reflected the feminine gender schemas of flexibility and collegiality/collaboration, which were more apparent in the prototypically masculine Engineering field than in the prototypically feminine Education field. Implications for how doctoral education can be re-conceptualized, delivered, and researched are provided, calling for the incorporation of more feminine gender schemas into doctoral education culture in order to promote and achieve gender equity. Advisors/Committee Members: Heather Rowan-Kenyon (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: doctoral degree completion; doctoral degree progress; doctoral student experience; Education doctoral education; Engineering doctoral education; women doctoral students

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APA (6th Edition):

Masterman, A. K. (2014). Women's Doctoral Student Experiences and Degree Progress in Education versus Engineering. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston College. Retrieved from http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101808

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Masterman, Ann Katherine. “Women's Doctoral Student Experiences and Degree Progress in Education versus Engineering.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston College. Accessed April 19, 2019. http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101808.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Masterman, Ann Katherine. “Women's Doctoral Student Experiences and Degree Progress in Education versus Engineering.” 2014. Web. 19 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Masterman AK. Women's Doctoral Student Experiences and Degree Progress in Education versus Engineering. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston College; 2014. [cited 2019 Apr 19]. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101808.

Council of Science Editors:

Masterman AK. Women's Doctoral Student Experiences and Degree Progress in Education versus Engineering. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston College; 2014. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101808


Boston College

2. Lewis, Jonathan Scott. The Role of Work Experiences in College Student Leadership Development: Evidence From a National Dataset and a Text Mining Approach to Examining Beliefs About Leadership.

Degree: PhD, Educational Leadership and Higher Education, 2017, Boston College

Paid employment is one of the most common extracurricular activities among full-time undergraduates, and an array of studies has attempted to measure its impact. Methodological concerns with the extant literature, however, make it difficult to draw reliable conclusions. Furthermore, the research on working college students has little to say about relationships between employment and leadership development, a key student learning outcome. This study addressed these gaps in two ways, using a national sample of 77,489 students from the 2015 Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership. First, it employed quasi-experimental methods and hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to investigate relationships between work variables (i.e., working status, work location, and hours worked) and both capacity and self-efficacy for leadership. Work location for students employed on-campus was disaggregated into 14 functional departments to allow for more nuanced analysis. Second, this study used text mining methods to examine the language that participants used to define leadership, which enabled a rich comparison between students’ conceptualizations and contemporary leadership theory. Results from HLM analysis suggested that working for pay is associated with lower self-reported leadership capacity, as defined by the social change model of leadership development, and that this relationship varies by workplace location and across institutional characteristics. The association between working status and self-efficacy for leadership was found to be practically non-significant, and hours worked per week were unrelated to either outcome. Results from text mining analysis suggested that most students conceptualize leadership using language that resonates with the industrial paradigm of leadership theory— leadership resides in a person with authority, who enacts specific behaviors and directs a group toward a goal. Disaggregated findings suggested that students who work off-campus consider leadership differently, using language consonant with contemporary, post-industrial scholarship—leadership is a dynamic, relational, non-coercive process that results in personal growth and positive change. In sum, the findings both echo and challenge aspects of existing research on leadership and working college students. Future research should explore off-campus work environments in greater detail, while practitioners and scholars who supervise students should aim to infuse post-industrial conceptualizations into on-campus work environments. Advisors/Committee Members: Heather Rowan-Kenyon (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Higher Education; Leadership Theory; Student Employment; Student Leadership; Text Mining

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lewis, J. S. (2017). The Role of Work Experiences in College Student Leadership Development: Evidence From a National Dataset and a Text Mining Approach to Examining Beliefs About Leadership. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston College. Retrieved from http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:107652

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lewis, Jonathan Scott. “The Role of Work Experiences in College Student Leadership Development: Evidence From a National Dataset and a Text Mining Approach to Examining Beliefs About Leadership.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston College. Accessed April 19, 2019. http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:107652.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lewis, Jonathan Scott. “The Role of Work Experiences in College Student Leadership Development: Evidence From a National Dataset and a Text Mining Approach to Examining Beliefs About Leadership.” 2017. Web. 19 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Lewis JS. The Role of Work Experiences in College Student Leadership Development: Evidence From a National Dataset and a Text Mining Approach to Examining Beliefs About Leadership. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston College; 2017. [cited 2019 Apr 19]. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:107652.

Council of Science Editors:

Lewis JS. The Role of Work Experiences in College Student Leadership Development: Evidence From a National Dataset and a Text Mining Approach to Examining Beliefs About Leadership. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston College; 2017. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:107652


Boston College

3. Hottell, Derek. Exploring Self-Reported Survey Data in Higher Education as an Artifact of Socio-Environmentally Influenced Behavior.

Degree: PhD, Educational Leadership and Higher Education, 2016, Boston College

Much of the research about college student engagement is based upon self-reported surveys, but little is known about how students formulate responses to these instruments. The purpose of this study was to specifically address this dearth of knowledge by deepening our understanding of how students’ perceptions of their environments and demographic characteristics influenced their response patterns on self-reported surveys. Bronfenbrenner’s (2005) human ecology model of development, Bourdieu and Passeron’s (1990) theory of social reproduction, and Tourangeau, Rips, and Rasinski’s (2000) four phase survey response process were used, as the theoretical framework to better understand this phenomenon. This was an explanatory sequential mixed methods study, and the participants were first-year undergraduate students at a four-year, private institution in New England. Students completed the College Student Report (CSR) as well as a series of time-use diaries, and the results of the instruments were compared using descriptive and multivariate analyses. Finally, semi-structured individual interviews were conducted, which included aspects of retrospective cognitive interviewing, with twenty-seven (27) students to understand how their experiences and response processes were shaped by their individual campus experiences and identities. Findings from this study suggest the construct validity of self-reported survey data measuring behavioral frequency patterns is questionable, as students statistically significantly under reported time spent preparing for class, engaging in co-curricular activities, commuting to campus, and relaxing and socializing. Furthermore, student characteristics such as racial/ethnic identity and satisfaction with college choice statistically significantly explained some of the variance in the reporting behaviors of students after controlling for other factors. This information coupled with the data gleaned from the semi-structured individual interviews indicate factors related to how students differentially experience the campus environment based upon their unique ecological niches affects how they respond on self-reported surveys, which means the data provided by such instrumentation is likely providing substantively different information than how it is most commonly interpreted and applied. Advisors/Committee Members: Heather Rowan-Kenyon (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Culture; Higher Education; Identity; Response Bias; Survey Design; Time-use Diaries

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hottell, D. (2016). Exploring Self-Reported Survey Data in Higher Education as an Artifact of Socio-Environmentally Influenced Behavior. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston College. Retrieved from http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:107175

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hottell, Derek. “Exploring Self-Reported Survey Data in Higher Education as an Artifact of Socio-Environmentally Influenced Behavior.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston College. Accessed April 19, 2019. http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:107175.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hottell, Derek. “Exploring Self-Reported Survey Data in Higher Education as an Artifact of Socio-Environmentally Influenced Behavior.” 2016. Web. 19 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Hottell D. Exploring Self-Reported Survey Data in Higher Education as an Artifact of Socio-Environmentally Influenced Behavior. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston College; 2016. [cited 2019 Apr 19]. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:107175.

Council of Science Editors:

Hottell D. Exploring Self-Reported Survey Data in Higher Education as an Artifact of Socio-Environmentally Influenced Behavior. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston College; 2016. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:107175

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