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You searched for +publisher:"Boston College" +contributor:("Dennis L. Shirley"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Boston College

1. Evans, Michael Pier. Inside Education Organizing: Learning to Work for Educational Change.

Degree: PhD, Teacher Education, Special Education, Curriculum and Instruction, 2009, Boston College

Over the past fifteen years there has been a growing scholarly interest in education issues among community based organizations (CBOs). Education organizing is the mobilization of parents and community members for the purpose of transforming schools and CBOs have already demonstrated their ability to impact both student outcomes and educational policy (Shirley, 1997). The Annenberg Institute found that "successful organizing strategies contributed to increased student attendance, improved standardized test score performance, higher graduation rates and college-going aspirations" (Mediratta, Shah, & McAlister, 2008 ). While an increasing number of researchers are exploring this phenomenon, we know little about the experiences of CBOs members who are engaged in this work. Utilizing a qualitative case study approach and a conceptual framework that draws from situated learning, social capital, and networking theory, this study explored the following questions as they relate to the experiences of members in three different CBOs: * What motivates families to participate in CBOs involved in education organizing? * How do members learn the work of education organizing? What skills (if any) are acquired as both individuals and as a collective, and how are they developed? * What impact (both material and personal) does participation have on CBO members' lives? Findings from this study revealed that participation in the process of education organizing has the potential to not only transform schools, but the participants themselves. Initial understandings of self-interest evolved to include broader social concerns. Members reported increases in confidence, desire, and ability to fully participate in democratic processes. The findings also indicated that the effectiveness of a CBO is related to its organizational structure, its members' capacity for learning, the types of issues that members are trying to address, and the strength of their relationships within local civic ecologies. Those groups that were able to operate in diverse networks while developing the necessary technological, political, and cultural knowledge generally met with the most success. Advisors/Committee Members: Dennis L. Shirley (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Community Organizing; Education Policy; Educational Change; Family Involvement; Family; School; Community Partnerships; Parent Involvement

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Evans, M. P. (2009). Inside Education Organizing: Learning to Work for Educational Change. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston College. Retrieved from http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101908

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Evans, Michael Pier. “Inside Education Organizing: Learning to Work for Educational Change.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston College. Accessed November 22, 2019. http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101908.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Evans, Michael Pier. “Inside Education Organizing: Learning to Work for Educational Change.” 2009. Web. 22 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Evans MP. Inside Education Organizing: Learning to Work for Educational Change. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston College; 2009. [cited 2019 Nov 22]. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101908.

Council of Science Editors:

Evans MP. Inside Education Organizing: Learning to Work for Educational Change. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston College; 2009. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:101908


Boston College

2. Peters, Lyda S. Reclaiming the Narrative: Black Community Activism and Boston School Desegregation History 1960-1975.

Degree: PhD, Teacher Education, Special Education, Curriculum and Instruction, 2017, Boston College

This research study is a historical analysis of Boston school desegregation viewed through the lens of Black Bostonians who gave rise to a Black Education Movement. Its purpose is to place Boston’s school desegregation history in a markedly different context than many of the narratives that evolved since Morgan v. Hennigan (1974). First, it provides a historical connection between the 18th and 19th century long road to equal schooling and the 20th century equal educational opportunity movement, both led by Black activists who lived in Boston. Second, it provides a public space for the voices of 20th century activists to tell their accounts of schooling in Boston. The narrators in this study attended Boston public schools and became leaders and foot soldiers in the struggle to dismantle a racially segregated school system. Ten case studies of Boston’s Black activists provide the foundation for this study. They recount, through oral history, a community movement whose goal was to save children attending majority Black schools from a system that was destroying them. Two theoretical perspectives, Critical Race Theory and Resiliency, inform the research design and findings. The findings shed light on agency from within the Black community, what changes were expected in the schools, the range of views regarding the intent of desegregation, and how systemic racism was the force that drove this community to dismantle a system that violated the 14th Amendment rights of Black students. Advisors/Committee Members: Dennis L. Shirley (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: black activism; black community agency; boston school desegregation; race; resilience; school segregation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Peters, L. S. (2017). Reclaiming the Narrative: Black Community Activism and Boston School Desegregation History 1960-1975. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston College. Retrieved from http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:107318

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Peters, Lyda S. “Reclaiming the Narrative: Black Community Activism and Boston School Desegregation History 1960-1975.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston College. Accessed November 22, 2019. http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:107318.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Peters, Lyda S. “Reclaiming the Narrative: Black Community Activism and Boston School Desegregation History 1960-1975.” 2017. Web. 22 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Peters LS. Reclaiming the Narrative: Black Community Activism and Boston School Desegregation History 1960-1975. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston College; 2017. [cited 2019 Nov 22]. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:107318.

Council of Science Editors:

Peters LS. Reclaiming the Narrative: Black Community Activism and Boston School Desegregation History 1960-1975. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston College; 2017. Available from: http://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:107318

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