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You searched for +publisher:"Baylor University" +contributor:("Limbers, Christine C"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Baylor University

1. [No author]. Sleep quality as a moderator between self-control and the intention-behavior gap of diet and physical activity.

Degree: 2017, Baylor University

Meta-analyses and weight regulation treatment studies found inconsistent direct relationships between cognitive self-control and complicated behaviors such as healthy diet and engagement in physical activity. Variability in relationships may be due to challenging conditions such as sleep restriction the night before assessment, which has been shown to impact self-regulatory capacity the following day. In fact, varying levels of sleep quality complaints are independently associated with execution of health behaviors such as diet and physical activity. Although studies assess direct relationships between sleep, self-control and health behaviors, no study to date has examined how sleep quality complaints moderate the relationship between cognitive self-control and health behaviors while accounting for individual differences in intention. Barber and Munz (2011) found college students who self-reported consistent, good-quality sleep throughout a 5-day period experienced greater self-regulatory task strength (handgrip task) and lower perceived psychological strain compared to baselines measurements. These results indicate sleep complaints are associated with performance on a simple self-regulatory task, but findings may not apply to complicated self-control tasks such as weight regulating behaviors. The present study was designed to measure whether the interaction between objective measures of self-control (working memory or inhibition) and sleep quality complaints predict successful execution of diet and physical activity goals. Multiple hierarchical linear regression models were used to analyze the interaction effects of sleep quality complaints and self-control on health behavior. Results indicate sleep latency moderates the relationship between working memory and the intention-behavior gap of vegetable consumption, but not intention-behavior gaps of fruit consumption or engagement in physical activity. Findings can inform future interventions aimed at increasing control over weight gain among students during their transition from high school to college. Advisors/Committee Members: Limbers, Christine C (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Self-control. Intention-behavior gap. Fruits and vegetables. Physical activity. Executive control.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

author], [. (2017). Sleep quality as a moderator between self-control and the intention-behavior gap of diet and physical activity. (Thesis). Baylor University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2104/10146

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

author], [No. “Sleep quality as a moderator between self-control and the intention-behavior gap of diet and physical activity. ” 2017. Thesis, Baylor University. Accessed September 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2104/10146.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

author], [No. “Sleep quality as a moderator between self-control and the intention-behavior gap of diet and physical activity. ” 2017. Web. 23 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

author] [. Sleep quality as a moderator between self-control and the intention-behavior gap of diet and physical activity. [Internet] [Thesis]. Baylor University; 2017. [cited 2019 Sep 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2104/10146.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

author] [. Sleep quality as a moderator between self-control and the intention-behavior gap of diet and physical activity. [Thesis]. Baylor University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2104/10146

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Baylor University

2. [No author]. Acculturative stress and obesity : the moderating role of emotional eating in a community sample of Latino/a adolescents.

Degree: 2018, Baylor University

Acculturating to American culture is often a stressful experience for Latino/a adolescents and has been associated with negative health outcomes and obesity. Previous research suggests that maladaptive coping increases the association between stressful acculturative experiences and negative health outcomes. Emotional eating has been identified as a maladaptive coping mechanism in Latino/a adolescents and has been shown to contribute to increased weight. However, previous studies have investigated neither differenes in emotional eating and stress between Latino/a and non-Latino/a adolescents, nor the role of emotional eating as a coping mechanism for acculturative stress. The current study sought to fill these gaps using a community sample of 168 Latino/a adolescents. A series of Pearson correlations compared differences in emotional eating and stress between Latino/a and non-Latino/a adolescents. Second, a series of hierarchical linear regressions determined if emotional eating strengthened the relationship between baseline acculturative stress and longitudinal change in body mass index. Participants completed self-report measures of emotional eating, eating habits, perceived stress, and acculturative stress at time one. Height and weight measurements were taken at time one and repeated at a three-month follow-up. There were no differences in emotional eating between Latino/a and non-Latino/a adolescents. In Latino/a adolescents, neither acculturative stress nor emotional eating was associated with longitudinal change in body mass index. Further, emotional eating failed to moderate the relationship between acculturative stress and change in body mass index; additional research is needed to determine if acculturative stress or emotional eating contributes to longitudinal weight gain. Despite these negative findings, it appears that Latino/a adolescents are at a high risk for negative health outcomes. Compared to non-Latino/a adolescents, Latino/a adolescents demonstrated significantly higher body mass index at time one and time two, gained significantly more weight between time one and time two, demonstrated significantly worse eating patterns, and endorseed significantly higher levels of stress. Additionally, results suggest that acculturative stress is a significant risk factor for higher emotional eating in Latino/a adolesents. Such knowledge should be applied when considering prevention of disordered eating, unhealthy eating patterns, and weight gain in the rapidly growing population of Latino/a adolescents in the United States. Advisors/Committee Members: Limbers, Christine C (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Emotional eating. Acculturative stress. Latino. Adolescents.

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

author], [. (2018). Acculturative stress and obesity : the moderating role of emotional eating in a community sample of Latino/a adolescents. (Thesis). Baylor University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2104/10450

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

author], [No. “Acculturative stress and obesity : the moderating role of emotional eating in a community sample of Latino/a adolescents. ” 2018. Thesis, Baylor University. Accessed September 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2104/10450.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

author], [No. “Acculturative stress and obesity : the moderating role of emotional eating in a community sample of Latino/a adolescents. ” 2018. Web. 23 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

author] [. Acculturative stress and obesity : the moderating role of emotional eating in a community sample of Latino/a adolescents. [Internet] [Thesis]. Baylor University; 2018. [cited 2019 Sep 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2104/10450.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

author] [. Acculturative stress and obesity : the moderating role of emotional eating in a community sample of Latino/a adolescents. [Thesis]. Baylor University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2104/10450

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.