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You searched for +publisher:"Baylor University" +contributor:("Foley, Michael P., 1970-"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Baylor University

1. Boone, Mark J. The conversion and therapy of desire in Augustine's Cassiciacum dialogues.

Degree: Philosophy., 2010, Baylor University

The philosophical schools of late antiquity commonly diagnosed human unhappiness as rooted in some fundamental disorder in our desires, and offered various therapies or prescriptions for the healing of desire. Among these only the neo-Platonic treatment for desire requires redirecting desire towards an immaterial world. Although Augustine agrees with the neo-Platonists on the need to redirect our desires to an immaterial world, he does not adopt their therapy for desire. Instead he adopts a thoroughly Christian approach to the healing of desire. The conversion of desire results from the Trinitarian God's gracious actions taken to heal our desires. Augustine does not recommend fleeing from the influence of the body, as neo-Platonism encourages, but fleeing to Christ, immersing ourselves in the life of the Church, and practicing the theological virtues. In this dissertation I examine Augustine's Cassiciacum dialogues. In Contra Academicos (Against the Academics), Augustine argues that we must vigorously desire wisdom in order to attain it; that we must have hope in the possibility of attaining wisdom; and that our desire for wisdom must be bound in faith to Christ. In De beata vita (On the Happy Life), Augustine argues that the Trinitarian God is the only perennially satisfying object of desire and shows that the pursuit of God is the activity of a prayerful community of believers who are practicing faith, hope, and charity. In De ordine (On Order), Augustine recommends that the reordering of our desires be pursued through a liberal arts education and through Christian morals. In Soliloquia (Soliloquies), Augustine says that we ought to love God and the soul. He also reminds us to submit to Christ's authority and practice faith, hope, and love. After discussing these things, I discuss in a concluding chapter the harmony of love for God and love for human beings, pointing to passages in the dialogues that suggest this harmony. Advisors/Committee Members: Hibbs, Thomas S (advisor), Foley, Michael P., 1970- (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Augustine.; Cassiciacum.; Desire.; Conversion.; Therapy.; Neo-Platonism.; Platonism.; Eudaimonism.; Contra Academicos.; Against the Academics.; De beata vita.; On the Happy Life.; De ordine.; On Order.; Soliloquia.; Soliloquies.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Boone, M. J. (2010). The conversion and therapy of desire in Augustine's Cassiciacum dialogues. (Thesis). Baylor University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2104/7926

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Boone, Mark J. “The conversion and therapy of desire in Augustine's Cassiciacum dialogues. ” 2010. Thesis, Baylor University. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2104/7926.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Boone, Mark J. “The conversion and therapy of desire in Augustine's Cassiciacum dialogues. ” 2010. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Boone MJ. The conversion and therapy of desire in Augustine's Cassiciacum dialogues. [Internet] [Thesis]. Baylor University; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2104/7926.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Boone MJ. The conversion and therapy of desire in Augustine's Cassiciacum dialogues. [Thesis]. Baylor University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2104/7926

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Baylor University

2. Spano, John. Augustine against the academic doctrine, way of life, and use of philosophical writing.

Degree: Philosophy., 2013, Baylor University

The recent literature on Augustine’s Contra Academicos stresses the philosophical, ethical, and literary elements of the text. However, these works neglect the polemical role of the dialogue as a response to Cicero’s Academic Skepticism. I offer a reading of the first of Augustine’s Cassiciacum dialogues, the Contra Academicos, that shows how his work can be read as a comprehensive rejection of the Academic philosophical life and doctrine as presented in Cicero’s dialogue, the Academica. To accomplish the goal, the work begins with an analysis of the doctrine in, way of life recommended by, and pedagogical function of Cicero’s Academica. The remaining chapters examine Augustine’s response to each of these elements of Cicero’s work. In Chapter Three I accentuate the philosophical importance of Augustine’s accusation that the Academics practiced a form of esotericism. This accusation, largely neglected, helps underscore Augustine’s rhetorical strategies to cultivate in his students an awareness of philosophical ironic discourse. Chapter Four focuses upon Augustine’s critique of the Academic way of life and the problems that arise from their insistence that all must seek wisdom yet be content with the inevitable impossibility of finding wisdom. Chapters Five and Six examine Augustine’s positive contributions to philosophical writing. Augustine rejects the Academic emphasis that wisdom must be sought by reason alone, suggesting that reason and authority are the twin means for that pursuit. The dual emphasis disallows Augustine from pedagogical uses of deception in the dialogue form, a subtle but important shift from other philosophical uses of this form of writing. By allowing reason and authority to guide one in the pursuit of wisdom, Augustine’s work also steers the reader away from the despair that Academic skepticism can so easily cultivate. Advisors/Committee Members: Hibbs, Thomas S (advisor), Foley, Michael P., 1970- (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Augustine.; Cicero.; Contra Academicos.; Academica.; Irony.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Spano, J. (2013). Augustine against the academic doctrine, way of life, and use of philosophical writing. (Thesis). Baylor University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2104/8729

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Spano, John. “Augustine against the academic doctrine, way of life, and use of philosophical writing. ” 2013. Thesis, Baylor University. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2104/8729.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Spano, John. “Augustine against the academic doctrine, way of life, and use of philosophical writing. ” 2013. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Spano J. Augustine against the academic doctrine, way of life, and use of philosophical writing. [Internet] [Thesis]. Baylor University; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2104/8729.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Spano J. Augustine against the academic doctrine, way of life, and use of philosophical writing. [Thesis]. Baylor University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2104/8729

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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