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You searched for +publisher:"Athabasca University" +contributor:("Crichton, Susan"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Berry, Stuart. Tacit knowing made visible: The use and value of an online archive.

Degree: 2014, Athabasca University

This dissertation outlines a design-based research study that takes place within two subsequent iterations of an online Masters’ course. This study examines the use and value of a learning archive, as perceived by students through their interactions with learning artefacts used during their course. Their course is held within an innovative and experimental social-networked learning environment. This study is based on key elements of organizational knowledge creation theory, in particular the process of knowledge creation and the concept of ba being the underlying context within which this knowledge is developed. This study documents the perceived impact that visible and persistent knowledge artefacts have on the process of learning. This study also shows that as artefacts are accessed and integrated into the overall learning process student engagement and efficacy are perceived to change in a positive way, and these changes impact both the learning environment and the learning process. This study produces two key outcomes. The first outcome is that the use of a socially networked online learning environment as a virtual classroom can offer a richness and an openness through its capacity to create, annotate, rate, and comment upon persistent artefacts. This use, coupled with permeable and flexible boundaries in the learning environment, offers richness to the learning experience. Learners within a social-networked space, as is used for this study, have complete control over their privacy settings and can make their contributions as open or as closed as desired. This type of environment encourages learning beyond the confines of the classroom and provides support for learner engagement and efficacy. The second key finding is that students in this study support the inclusion of a dynamic course archive containing artefacts from learners in prior iterations of the course. Given the structural limitations of many online learning environments, this study demonstrates that such an archive is likely best placed with a social-networked learning space and with appropriate search, tagging, and navigation tools. The study demonstrates that students will and have benefited from the archive’s use in support of their learning and will contribute to it in support of the learning of others.

2014-03

Advisors/Committee Members: Fahy, Patrick (Centre for Distance Education, Athabasca University), Kennedy, Mary (Centre for Distance Education, Athabasca University), Crichton, Susan (University of British Columbia), Anderson, Terry (Centre for Distance Education, Athabasca University).

Subjects/Keywords: Distance education; Online archive; Design-based research; Socially networked online learning environment; Organizational knowledge creation; Learning artefacts

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Berry, S. (2014). Tacit knowing made visible: The use and value of an online archive. (Thesis). Athabasca University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10791/42

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Berry, Stuart. “Tacit knowing made visible: The use and value of an online archive.” 2014. Thesis, Athabasca University. Accessed September 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10791/42.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Berry, Stuart. “Tacit knowing made visible: The use and value of an online archive.” 2014. Web. 23 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Berry S. Tacit knowing made visible: The use and value of an online archive. [Internet] [Thesis]. Athabasca University; 2014. [cited 2019 Sep 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10791/42.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Berry S. Tacit knowing made visible: The use and value of an online archive. [Thesis]. Athabasca University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10791/42

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Jalovcic, Dzenana. Experiences of interaction for students with disabilities in online university programs.

Degree: 2017, Athabasca University

There is growing interest in online learners with disabilities because of an increase in the number of students with disabilities enrolled in universities and colleges across North America, enabling human rights legislation, and opportunities presented by advances in use of information and communication technologies in education. The past decade has seen a significant number of publications covering this topic; however, the experience of students with disabilities engaged in online learning remains an under-researched area. To address this gap in the research literature, a descriptive phenomenological study was conducted to describe the experience of interaction for students with disabilities who study online in an institution of higher education. The structure of the experience of interactions for students with disabilities in online programs had five constituents: having access, working harder, being supported, being connected, and becoming. Having access, working harder, being supported, and being connected were constituents that had a high intra-constituent variability in which experiences of students were not described as a singularity but as a continuum that ranged from a lack of or a limited presence of the constituent to fully present constituent in participants’ descriptions. Students also described the following barriers: processes of accessing accommodations, inconsistencies in providing accommodations, a lack of awareness of disability, accommodations, rights and obligations among instructors, responsiveness of the system to students’ inquiries, and over-reliance on a single mode or an activity in the design of courses. Knowing themselves and flexibility were facilitators that helped students with disabilities learn in the online environment. Flexibility was a multidimensional concept including flexibility of time, people, processes, infrastructure, course design, and funding. This research contributes to the current body of knowledge by capturing experiences of students with disabilities that are mostly absent from the literature. By describing the nature of students’ experiences of online learning, this study revealed that there was an institutional capacity to support students with disabilities in online higher education; however, this capacity was not present consistently within programs and across different departments pointing to the areas of potential changes at instructional, administrative, service, and policy levels.

2018-06

Advisors/Committee Members: Crichton, Susan (University of British Columbia, Faculty of Education, Innovative Learning Centre), Chmiliar, Linda (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Centre for Social Sciences), Blodgett-Griffin, Cynthia (Centre for Distance Education), Moisey, Susan (Centre for Distance Education).

Subjects/Keywords: students with disabilities; online higher education; interaction; online postsecondary education; disabled students; online university programs

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jalovcic, D. (2017). Experiences of interaction for students with disabilities in online university programs. (Thesis). Athabasca University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10791/239

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jalovcic, Dzenana. “Experiences of interaction for students with disabilities in online university programs.” 2017. Thesis, Athabasca University. Accessed September 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10791/239.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jalovcic, Dzenana. “Experiences of interaction for students with disabilities in online university programs.” 2017. Web. 23 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Jalovcic D. Experiences of interaction for students with disabilities in online university programs. [Internet] [Thesis]. Athabasca University; 2017. [cited 2019 Sep 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10791/239.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jalovcic D. Experiences of interaction for students with disabilities in online university programs. [Thesis]. Athabasca University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10791/239

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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