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You searched for +publisher:"Athabasca University" +contributor:("Chmiliar, Linda"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Batsford-Mermans, Angela. Accommodating Aboriginal students in online courses.

Degree: 2015, Athabasca University

This research study examined the design elements required to create an online course for Aboriginal students with mild intellectual disability (MID). Action research was undertaken to design an intervention to address the problem of students with MID at Keewaytinook Internet High School (KiHS) not having their needs met in online courses, which included not receiving all of the accommodations in online courses as prescribed on their individual education plans (IEPs). The intervention was based on revising a grade nine math course currently offered at KiHS to incorporate design elements, including accommodations related to course design, in order to meet the academic needs of these students. The design elements were selected based on a review of literature and the responses to a questionnaire given to teachers asking what course design elements they felt would help meet the needs of students with MID. Once the revised course was delivered, it was evaluated using questionnaires and interviews asking teachers about the perceived success of the course. Overall, teachers felt that the intervention was a success in all five areas of course design: goals; content; context; methods; and assessment. The following specific design elements were seen as beneficial to students: use of interactive materials, continual review of content, simplified template, removal of external links, simplified language, and clearly stated goals (curriculum expectations) for each lesson. Although this research study focused on a specific group of students, the findings may be valuable for online instructors who work with students with similar needs to those with MID.

2015-12

Advisors/Committee Members: Moisey, Susan (Athabasca University), Chmiliar, Linda (Athabasca University), Janes, Diane (University of Alberta), Hoven, Debra (Athabasca University).

Subjects/Keywords: Online Education; Mild Intellectual Disability; Course Design; Aboriginal Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Batsford-Mermans, A. (2015). Accommodating Aboriginal students in online courses. (Thesis). Athabasca University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10791/181

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Batsford-Mermans, Angela. “Accommodating Aboriginal students in online courses.” 2015. Thesis, Athabasca University. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10791/181.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Batsford-Mermans, Angela. “Accommodating Aboriginal students in online courses.” 2015. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Batsford-Mermans A. Accommodating Aboriginal students in online courses. [Internet] [Thesis]. Athabasca University; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10791/181.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Batsford-Mermans A. Accommodating Aboriginal students in online courses. [Thesis]. Athabasca University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10791/181

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Jalovcic, Dzenana. Experiences of interaction for students with disabilities in online university programs.

Degree: 2017, Athabasca University

There is growing interest in online learners with disabilities because of an increase in the number of students with disabilities enrolled in universities and colleges across North America, enabling human rights legislation, and opportunities presented by advances in use of information and communication technologies in education. The past decade has seen a significant number of publications covering this topic; however, the experience of students with disabilities engaged in online learning remains an under-researched area. To address this gap in the research literature, a descriptive phenomenological study was conducted to describe the experience of interaction for students with disabilities who study online in an institution of higher education. The structure of the experience of interactions for students with disabilities in online programs had five constituents: having access, working harder, being supported, being connected, and becoming. Having access, working harder, being supported, and being connected were constituents that had a high intra-constituent variability in which experiences of students were not described as a singularity but as a continuum that ranged from a lack of or a limited presence of the constituent to fully present constituent in participants’ descriptions. Students also described the following barriers: processes of accessing accommodations, inconsistencies in providing accommodations, a lack of awareness of disability, accommodations, rights and obligations among instructors, responsiveness of the system to students’ inquiries, and over-reliance on a single mode or an activity in the design of courses. Knowing themselves and flexibility were facilitators that helped students with disabilities learn in the online environment. Flexibility was a multidimensional concept including flexibility of time, people, processes, infrastructure, course design, and funding. This research contributes to the current body of knowledge by capturing experiences of students with disabilities that are mostly absent from the literature. By describing the nature of students’ experiences of online learning, this study revealed that there was an institutional capacity to support students with disabilities in online higher education; however, this capacity was not present consistently within programs and across different departments pointing to the areas of potential changes at instructional, administrative, service, and policy levels.

2018-06

Advisors/Committee Members: Crichton, Susan (University of British Columbia, Faculty of Education, Innovative Learning Centre), Chmiliar, Linda (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Centre for Social Sciences), Blodgett-Griffin, Cynthia (Centre for Distance Education), Moisey, Susan (Centre for Distance Education).

Subjects/Keywords: students with disabilities; online higher education; interaction; online postsecondary education; disabled students; online university programs

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jalovcic, D. (2017). Experiences of interaction for students with disabilities in online university programs. (Thesis). Athabasca University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10791/239

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jalovcic, Dzenana. “Experiences of interaction for students with disabilities in online university programs.” 2017. Thesis, Athabasca University. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10791/239.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jalovcic, Dzenana. “Experiences of interaction for students with disabilities in online university programs.” 2017. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Jalovcic D. Experiences of interaction for students with disabilities in online university programs. [Internet] [Thesis]. Athabasca University; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10791/239.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jalovcic D. Experiences of interaction for students with disabilities in online university programs. [Thesis]. Athabasca University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10791/239

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Rinn, Avril. Wistful determination: Adults’ perceptions of their learning disability diagnoses.

Degree: 2017, Athabasca University

It was once supposed that children “grew out of” learning disabilities (LDs), but it is now known that these are lifelong conditions that can negatively affect many aspects of a person’s life. Although the value of receiving a diagnosis is frequently cited as an important step in the process of ameliorating the condition, there is little qualitative research into the experience of being diagnosed in adulthood. This investigation examined the lived experience of receiving an LD diagnosis as an adult with the purpose of developing a deeper understanding of how the process affected subjects. Phenomenological heuristic inquiry was used and data was obtained by interviewing four adults who self-reported as having been diagnosed with LDs. Common themes that emerged included feelings of anger, grief, relief, regret, hope and resilience. All agreed that receiving a formal diagnosis was important to them.

2017-04

Advisors/Committee Members: Chang, Jeff ((Faculty of Health Disciplines, Master of Counselling Pogram), Chmiliar, Linda (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Centre for Social Sciences), Jerry, Paul (Faculty of Health Disciplines, Master of Counselling Program).

Subjects/Keywords: heuristic inquiry; learning disability; lived experience; phenomenology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rinn, A. (2017). Wistful determination: Adults’ perceptions of their learning disability diagnoses. (Thesis). Athabasca University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10791/224

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rinn, Avril. “Wistful determination: Adults’ perceptions of their learning disability diagnoses.” 2017. Thesis, Athabasca University. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10791/224.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rinn, Avril. “Wistful determination: Adults’ perceptions of their learning disability diagnoses.” 2017. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Rinn A. Wistful determination: Adults’ perceptions of their learning disability diagnoses. [Internet] [Thesis]. Athabasca University; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10791/224.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Rinn A. Wistful determination: Adults’ perceptions of their learning disability diagnoses. [Thesis]. Athabasca University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10791/224

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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