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You searched for +publisher:"Antioch University" +contributor:("Kaplin, Beth"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. William, Apollinaire. Smallholder Farmers, Environmental Change and Adaptation in a Human-Dominated Landscape in the Northern Highlands of Rwanda.

Degree: PhD, Antioch New England: Environmental Studies, 2018, Antioch University

Climate change and crop intensification are key challenges to the livelihoods and wellbeing of the majority of rural smallholder farmers in developing countries, particularly in human-dominated, climate-sensitive landscapes such as the northern highlands of Rwanda where issues of fluvial floods, soil erosion pose serious threats to the livelihoods of smallholder farmers. In this mixed methods study conducted between August and December 2015, I explored smallholder farmers’ perceptions by examining what barriers might hinder the process of agroforestry adoption by smallholder farmers, what socio-economic and physical factors and attitudes influence crop choices, motivations for smallholder farmers’ willingness to plant trees within riparian buffer zones and opportunities and challenges to the establishment of riparian buffer zones that maintain ecosystem services. Results indicate that challenges to adoption of agroforestry to support climate change adaptation and food security in Rwanda are related to land scarcity, poverty, limited technological and financial capacity among most smallholder farmers, limited engagement of smallholder farmers in agroforestry research and an inclination for short term benefits that could hinder adoption of agroforestry which has a long term investment. Most smallholder farmers believed that the onset of short rains comes earlier in recent years compared to more than ten years ago. In response, most farmers reported that they plant crops earlier in the season. Results from rainfall analysis, although not conclusive, show a shift in rainy day frequency. Respondents who strongly agreed that soil erosion within farms proximal to streams is a serious threat were more likely to support the idea that establishing a riparian buffer would help entrap sediments and mitigate soil erosion within farmlands adjacent to streams. However, farmers reported that establishing a functional riparian buffer requires engagement with extension services, financial incentives and technological assistance. Perceptions of costs and benefits of riparian zone management was found to be the most important factors influencing farmers’ intentions to manage riparian zones. Engagement of smallholder farmers in the agrarian policy development process and their active participation in the implementation of adaptation strategies may be needed in order to provide an opportunity for farmers to learn technologies involved and assess costs and benefits of the practices. This would also insure that smallholder farmers’ goals and interests are met. Advisors/Committee Members: Kaplin, Beth (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Environmental Science; Environmental Studies; Environmental Management; Water Resource Management; Forestry; Agriculture; Smallholder farmer; perceptions; climate change adaptation; environmental change; agroforestry; riparian buffer; crop intensification; ecosystem services; soil erosion; water quality; extension services; Upper Mukungwa Watershed; Rwanda

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

William, A. (2018). Smallholder Farmers, Environmental Change and Adaptation in a Human-Dominated Landscape in the Northern Highlands of Rwanda. (Doctoral Dissertation). Antioch University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1527182117011253

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

William, Apollinaire. “Smallholder Farmers, Environmental Change and Adaptation in a Human-Dominated Landscape in the Northern Highlands of Rwanda.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Antioch University. Accessed March 18, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1527182117011253.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

William, Apollinaire. “Smallholder Farmers, Environmental Change and Adaptation in a Human-Dominated Landscape in the Northern Highlands of Rwanda.” 2018. Web. 18 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

William A. Smallholder Farmers, Environmental Change and Adaptation in a Human-Dominated Landscape in the Northern Highlands of Rwanda. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Antioch University; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 18]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1527182117011253.

Council of Science Editors:

William A. Smallholder Farmers, Environmental Change and Adaptation in a Human-Dominated Landscape in the Northern Highlands of Rwanda. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Antioch University; 2018. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1527182117011253


Antioch University

2. Wengerd, Nicole M. Protected Area Planning and Management: Supporting Local Stakeholder Participation with an Asset-Based, Biocultural Approach.

Degree: PhD, Antioch New England: Environmental Studies, 2018, Antioch University

Given the uncertainties and risks of anthropogenic climate change, the urgency to conserve biodiversity has renewed urgency that has prompted a number of international forums, treaties, and agencies to advocate for the establishment of new and/or expansion of existing protected areas. One of the most broadly recognized efforts to expand the global protected area network can be found in the Aichi Biodiversity Targets, outlined in the Convention on Biological Diversity Strategic Plan for 2011-2020, adopted in 2010 by 196 countries. Target 11 calls for the expansion of terrestrail and inland water areas, as well as coastal marine areas. While the number of designated protected areas has more than doubled in less than 25 years, how to achieve the more qualitative elements of Aichi Biodiversity Target 11, specifically how to manage protected areas effectively and equitably has been a more challenging task. This research focuses on supporting quality local stakeholder participation in protected area planning and management as a method of achieving these elements. Using key components of a biocultural approach and the principles and methods of asset-based community development, the following articles examine if and how an approach that combines these concepts can be a useful tool in achieving Target 11’s mandate of more effective and equitable PA management. Advisors/Committee Members: Kaplin, Beth (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Conservation; Environmental Studies; Protected Area; Conservation; Biocultural Diversity; Asset Based Community Development

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wengerd, N. M. (2018). Protected Area Planning and Management: Supporting Local Stakeholder Participation with an Asset-Based, Biocultural Approach. (Doctoral Dissertation). Antioch University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1527354940207694

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wengerd, Nicole M. “Protected Area Planning and Management: Supporting Local Stakeholder Participation with an Asset-Based, Biocultural Approach.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Antioch University. Accessed March 18, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1527354940207694.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wengerd, Nicole M. “Protected Area Planning and Management: Supporting Local Stakeholder Participation with an Asset-Based, Biocultural Approach.” 2018. Web. 18 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Wengerd NM. Protected Area Planning and Management: Supporting Local Stakeholder Participation with an Asset-Based, Biocultural Approach. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Antioch University; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 18]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1527354940207694.

Council of Science Editors:

Wengerd NM. Protected Area Planning and Management: Supporting Local Stakeholder Participation with an Asset-Based, Biocultural Approach. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Antioch University; 2018. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1527354940207694


Antioch University

3. Mlotha, McArd Joseph. Analysis of Land Use/Land Cover Change Impacts Upon Ecosystem Services in Montane Tropical Forest of Rwanda: Forest Carbon Assessment and REDD+ Preparedness.

Degree: PhD, Antioch New England: Environmental Studies, 2018, Antioch University

Changes in forest cover especially changes within tropical forests, affect global climate change, together with ecosystems and forest carbon. Forests play a key role in both carbon emission and carbon sequestration. Efforts to reduce emissions through reduced deforestation and degradation of forests have become a common discussion among scientists and politicians under the auspices of the United Nations Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (UN-REDD Programme). This dissertation research assessed the impacts of land use land cover change upon ecosystem services from a protected area focusing on forest carbon distribution and vegetation mapping using remote sensing and geographical information systems (GIS). I also assessed Rwanda’s preparedness in the United Nations global program, Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation, Measuring, Monitoring, Reporting, and Verifying (REDD+MMRV). I carried out research in Nyungwe National Park (NNP), one of four National Parks of Rwanda. NNP is a montane tropical forest located in the Albertine Rift, one of the most biodiverse places in central and east Africa. I used remote sensing and field data collection from December 2011 and July 2012 in the western part of the Park to assess distribution and quantities of aboveground (ABG) forest carbon using generalized allometric functions. Using Landsat data together with 2009 high resolution color orthophotos and groundtruthing, I analyzed land cover changes between 1986 and 2011 for NNP. The land-use land cover change analysis showed that between 1986 and 1995 there was a minor increase in forest cover from 53% to 58% while from 1995-2003 a substantial decrease in forest cover occurred. Between 2003 and 2011 was a period of recovery with forest cover increasing by 59%. Vegetation analysis based on a 2009 Park biodiversity survey yielded 13 vegetation communities based on dominant and co-dominant species. Macaranga kilimandscharica was found to be dominant in three communities, representing 42% of the Park, and co-dominant in one community, representing 7% of the Park. While ~50% of the Park is secondary forest, the change in protection status has had a positive impact upon forest cover change within the Park. . Assessment of REDD+-MMRV readiness revealed that Rwanda has higher capacity and readiness in remote sensing and GIS than in forest inventory and carbon pools inventory. Lack of data to support development of emission models is a major problem at the national level which needs to be addressed. Advisors/Committee Members: Kaplin, Beth (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Environmental Studies; Geographic Information Science; Remote Sensing; Carbon emission; land cover change; land use; orthophotos; protected areas; Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation; Measuring Monitoring Reporting and Verifying; tropical forest; vegetation communities

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mlotha, M. J. (2018). Analysis of Land Use/Land Cover Change Impacts Upon Ecosystem Services in Montane Tropical Forest of Rwanda: Forest Carbon Assessment and REDD+ Preparedness. (Doctoral Dissertation). Antioch University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1527773591460797

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mlotha, McArd Joseph. “Analysis of Land Use/Land Cover Change Impacts Upon Ecosystem Services in Montane Tropical Forest of Rwanda: Forest Carbon Assessment and REDD+ Preparedness.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Antioch University. Accessed March 18, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1527773591460797.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mlotha, McArd Joseph. “Analysis of Land Use/Land Cover Change Impacts Upon Ecosystem Services in Montane Tropical Forest of Rwanda: Forest Carbon Assessment and REDD+ Preparedness.” 2018. Web. 18 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Mlotha MJ. Analysis of Land Use/Land Cover Change Impacts Upon Ecosystem Services in Montane Tropical Forest of Rwanda: Forest Carbon Assessment and REDD+ Preparedness. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Antioch University; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 18]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1527773591460797.

Council of Science Editors:

Mlotha MJ. Analysis of Land Use/Land Cover Change Impacts Upon Ecosystem Services in Montane Tropical Forest of Rwanda: Forest Carbon Assessment and REDD+ Preparedness. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Antioch University; 2018. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1527773591460797

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