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You searched for +publisher:"American University" +contributor:("Maguire, Edward R."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Kearns, Erin Marie. IF YOU SEE SOMETHING, DO YOU SAY SOMETHING?: THE ROLE OF LEGITIMACY AND TRUST IN POLICING MINORITY COMMUNITIES IN COUNTERTERRORISM.

Degree: 2016, American University

In 2006, Omar Hammami travelled to Somalia and joined Al Shabaab. In the years since, dozens of Americans including Douglas McCain and Zakia Nasrin have traveled to Syria and joined ISIS. During the same time, Dylan Roof, Robert Lewis Dear Jr., the Tsarnaev brothers, and others have carried out attacks—or attempted to do so—here at home. Sometimes friends or family members have alerted police to suspicions of terrorism like these, while other times they have not. The need to counter terrorism has raised questions about the appropriate methods that police should employ to this end. Yet, current concerns about policing terrorism coincide with national responses to police interactions more generally with members of minority groups.I address two puzzles about interactions between communities and police. First, why do some people alert police to crime—specifically potential extremist violence—while others do not? Contrary to conventional explanations about racial and sociodemographic differences, I find that views of law enforcement's legitimacy, trust in individual police officers, and community norms about handling conflict are the strongest predictors of citizen cooperation. So, second, why do some police departments do a better job than others developing positive relationships with minority communities to increase cooperation? I find that support for relationship building and social distance predict views about community policing both with minorities and in counterterrorism.I combine an experimental design and quantitative survey research. Data come from two sources: community members and police officers. For the community sample, I conducted an online survey where participants were asked about their views of and experience with police. Propensity to report crimes was measured using choice-based conjoint experiments, which allow comparison of multiple covariates simultaneously. Participants evaluated a series of crime pairs with randomly assigned characteristics and indicated their likelihood of reporting each to police.I then conducted roll call surveys in three Washington, DC area police departments. Participants were asked about experience with, and support for, community policing and views on community policing to address various crimes and with different minority groups. Combining data from both groups, I compare police expectations to reports from the community.

Criminology

Public policy

Justice, Law and Society

Degree Awarded: Ph.D. Justice, Law and Society. American University

Advisors/Committee Members: American University (Publisher), Young, Joseph K. (Thesis advisor), Maguire, Edward R. (Other), Zeitzoff, Thomas (Other), LaFree, Gary (Other).

Subjects/Keywords: Criminology; Public policy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kearns, E. M. (2016). IF YOU SEE SOMETHING, DO YOU SAY SOMETHING?: THE ROLE OF LEGITIMACY AND TRUST IN POLICING MINORITY COMMUNITIES IN COUNTERTERRORISM. (Doctoral Dissertation). American University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1961/auislandora:68566

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kearns, Erin Marie. “IF YOU SEE SOMETHING, DO YOU SAY SOMETHING?: THE ROLE OF LEGITIMACY AND TRUST IN POLICING MINORITY COMMUNITIES IN COUNTERTERRORISM.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, American University. Accessed July 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1961/auislandora:68566.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kearns, Erin Marie. “IF YOU SEE SOMETHING, DO YOU SAY SOMETHING?: THE ROLE OF LEGITIMACY AND TRUST IN POLICING MINORITY COMMUNITIES IN COUNTERTERRORISM.” 2016. Web. 24 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Kearns EM. IF YOU SEE SOMETHING, DO YOU SAY SOMETHING?: THE ROLE OF LEGITIMACY AND TRUST IN POLICING MINORITY COMMUNITIES IN COUNTERTERRORISM. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. American University; 2016. [cited 2019 Jul 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/auislandora:68566.

Council of Science Editors:

Kearns EM. IF YOU SEE SOMETHING, DO YOU SAY SOMETHING?: THE ROLE OF LEGITIMACY AND TRUST IN POLICING MINORITY COMMUNITIES IN COUNTERTERRORISM. [Doctoral Dissertation]. American University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/auislandora:68566

2. Lugo, Kristina A. THE TIES THAT BIND: A SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS OF A LARGE GANG SEX TRAFFICKING NETWORK IN THE UNITED STATES.

Degree: 2016, American University

This dissertation examines the effect of network position on the probability that a sex trafficking network member avoided indictment in this gang RICO prosecution, and what that says about the functioning of trafficking networks and their resistance to fragmentation strategies by law enforcement. Ties between members, particularly involving members that broker relationships between otherwise disconnected individuals or groups, are hypothesized to be conduits through which benefits flow, such as power, information, or influence. Others hypothesize that brokerage positions can hold disadvantages, so that an advantageous position in one network may be disadvantageous in another. An individual in a brokerage position might also use his/her power strategically to block the flow of benefits between others.This study used police and court data to examine how brokerage, measured in different ways, influenced the probability of avoiding indictment. This is the first social network analysis of an individual human trafficking network in the United States, and it is the largest such study of a human trafficking network in terms of network size examined. It is distinctive in that it includes extensive data on both indicted and unindicted individuals in sufficient numbers to use broad boundaries and include the impact of porous network borders. Avoiding indictment is the dependent variable and is used as a proxy for survival, which is an important utility to be maximized when examining criminal trafficking networks as business enterprises. Results support the notion that relying on betweenness centrality alone to measure brokerage does not work as predictably well in larger networks; its effect was miniscule and statistically insignificant in every model where degree centrality, or the sheer number of people one is connected to, was included. This is contrary to the results of several network analyses involving smaller networks for a few important reasons, including the presence of multiple redundant ties and the lengths of paths between individuals in larger, more mature networks. Clustering coefficient emerged as a measure of brokerage worthy of more study.Important insights are also offered regarding the symbiotic relationships between perpetrators and victims. On a practical level, the goal of this study was to explore the extent to which identifying brokers in a sex trafficking network could help police target network members that would best fragment a network, thus reducing its ability to operate and exploit victims.

Criminology

Social structure

Gangs, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking, Social Network Analysis

Justice, Law and Society

Degree Awarded: Ph.D. Justice, Law and Society. American University

Advisors/Committee Members: American University (Publisher), Bennett, Richard R. (Thesis advisor), Maguire, Edward R. (Other), Albanese, Jay S. (Other), Fox, Andrew M. (Other), Melzer, Sharon A. (Other).

Subjects/Keywords: Gangs; Human Trafficking; Sex Trafficking; Social Network Analysis

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lugo, K. A. (2016). THE TIES THAT BIND: A SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS OF A LARGE GANG SEX TRAFFICKING NETWORK IN THE UNITED STATES. (Doctoral Dissertation). American University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1961/auislandora:68565

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lugo, Kristina A. “THE TIES THAT BIND: A SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS OF A LARGE GANG SEX TRAFFICKING NETWORK IN THE UNITED STATES.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, American University. Accessed July 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1961/auislandora:68565.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lugo, Kristina A. “THE TIES THAT BIND: A SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS OF A LARGE GANG SEX TRAFFICKING NETWORK IN THE UNITED STATES.” 2016. Web. 24 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Lugo KA. THE TIES THAT BIND: A SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS OF A LARGE GANG SEX TRAFFICKING NETWORK IN THE UNITED STATES. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. American University; 2016. [cited 2019 Jul 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/auislandora:68565.

Council of Science Editors:

Lugo KA. THE TIES THAT BIND: A SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS OF A LARGE GANG SEX TRAFFICKING NETWORK IN THE UNITED STATES. [Doctoral Dissertation]. American University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1961/auislandora:68565

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