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You searched for +publisher:"AUT University" +contributor:("Monro, John"). One record found.

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AUT University

1. Lu, Louise Weiwei. Which Rice and Why? A Healthier Choice .

Degree: AUT University

Rice has been a staple grain of the human diet for 9,000 years. Currently, more than half of the world’s population derives one-third of their total daily dietary energy intake from rice. The most popular rice product, white rice, has the oil-rich bran and germ layer removed to prolong shelf life and, compared with brown rice, requires less cooking and preparation. However, many product varieties of freshly cooked white rice are composed of rapidly digestible starch and when consumed may trigger a rapid and prolonged rise of blood glucose among people with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes. Regular and long-term consumption of freshly cooked white rice increases the glycaemic load (GL) of the diet and may be associated with an increased risk of hyperglycaemia and the development of type 2 diabetes, obesity and other metabolic diseases. In multicultural societies such as Auckland, New Zealand, the consumption of rice per capita is increasing. This series of experiments aimed to investigate in vitro and in vivo the effect of popular rice products and method of preparation on the digestibility of starch and glycaemic responses. The rice product that had the best starch profile and lowest GL was then investigated for sensory acceptability by participants who commonly consume cooked rice. The first series of in vitro experiments investigated five popular rice products: medium-grain white rice, medium-grain brown rice, long-grain brown rice, basmati rice and parboiled rice. Samples of each cooked product had the starch digestibility profile and glucose release measured when rice was freshly prepared (Chapter 4) and then when cooked rice was stored for two to 24 hours at 4 ºC, reheated, and minced (Chapter 5). The velocity and the extent of glucose release during in vitro enzymatic starch digestion over 180 minutes were compared. No significant difference in total starch content was observed among the five uncooked rice products. After full gelatinisation (i.e., cooking), the in vitro glucose release (gram glucose / gram dry weight base) within the first 20 minutes of digestion showed that medium-grain white rice reached 78.4% (SD ± 3.9%), basmati rice 41.5% (± 6.8%), medium-grain brown rice 36.5% (± 0.2%), long-grain brown rice 26.6% (± 2.3%) and parboiled rice 27.5 (± 5.8%) of the starch as glucose. After 180 minutes, the in vitro glucose release from whole grains of medium-grain white rice reached 98.3% (± 1.1%), basmati 87.7% (± 3.1%), medium-grain brown 76.5% (± 1.8%), long-grain brown 71.5% (± 2.5%) and parboiled 81.2% (± 1.0%). Up to eight hours of cold storage at 4 ºC and mincing the cold rice to 2,400 µm did not significantly change the glucose release trajectory in any of the five rice products (within 10% reduction, P = 0.1). When stored for more than 10 hours, the trajectory was reduced significantly. For medium-grain white, medium-grain brown and long-grain brown, the reduction was around 20% (P = 0.05), for basmati around 30% (P = 0.05) and for parboiled around 40% (P = 0.01). Conversely, for all five… Advisors/Committee Members: Rush, Elaine (advisor), Lu, Jun (advisor), Monro, John (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Rice; Parboiled; Cold storage; Reheating; In vitro glucose release; Starch digestibility; Rapidly digested starch; Slowly digested starch; Resistant starch; In vivo glucose response; Chewing; Satiety; Liking preference

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APA (6th Edition):

Lu, L. W. (n.d.). Which Rice and Why? A Healthier Choice . (Thesis). AUT University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10226

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lu, Louise Weiwei. “Which Rice and Why? A Healthier Choice .” Thesis, AUT University. Accessed October 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10226.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lu, Louise Weiwei. “Which Rice and Why? A Healthier Choice .” Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Lu LW. Which Rice and Why? A Healthier Choice . [Internet] [Thesis]. AUT University; [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10226.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Lu LW. Which Rice and Why? A Healthier Choice . [Thesis]. AUT University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10226

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

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