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You searched for +publisher:"AUT University" +contributor:("Le Fevre, Mark"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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AUT University

1. George, Clare. Stress through times of organisational change: its relevance to organisational outcomes .

Degree: 2012, AUT University

In today’s fast paced business environment change is something not only to expect but something to take advantage of. Without the ability to embrace change organisations may find they are being left behind competitors who are able to move their organisations past the hurdles that change brings. For many employees and managers alike, the thought of constant change can be daunting, with feelings of uncertainty and anxiousness as common reactions. Uncertainty often causes stress and as a result resistance. Resistance is a likely outcome in situations that seem too stressful to face. However, without the support and co-operation of employees, managers may find it difficult to achieve the desired outcomes. It was the intention of this research to investigate whether, according to managers, the management of stress associated with change may positively affect the change initiative outcomes. Semi-structured interviews were used to better understand seven managers’ perceptions of the idea that stress management interventions may positively affect the outcome of change. The participants were from a range of industries including the food, hospitality, finance, and engineering industries. Participants also included members from government departments, and a business consultancy firm. The managers were aware of the positive and negative effects of change on their employees and the organisations. There was consensus that uncertainty, lack of involvement, and pressure were stressors that both they and their employees faced during times of change. These factors are known to cause stress during ‘normal’ time however during times of change they are particularly evident. The stressors of most concern to the managers were consistent with those reported in the literature. However this is where the consistency ends. It is suggested in the literature that a combination of both primary and secondary interventions should be employed to reduce stress in the workplace with an emphasis on primary interventions. Managers had other ideas. The managers did not see the need to implement formal SMIs as they felt good management practice was more effective in reducing stress. It should be noted here that there are some similarities in what the managers considered good management practice and what the literature suggests for stress management in primary SMIs. Through the involvement of employees, trust gained and open communication the managers felt their employees could overcome any of the stressors that change caused. Many of the managers, in addition to good management practice, referred their employees to EAP programs as their SMI of choice. Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) were not seen to alter the outcome of the change however it was acknowledged by the managers that it gave the employees emotional tools to deal with stress in the future. Managers did not appear to believe that proactive stress management (primary and / or secondary SMIs) would be likely to improve the success of management change efforts, yet they did… Advisors/Committee Members: Le Fevre, Mark (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Organisational stress; Organisational change; Stress management; Stress Management Interventions (SMIs); Organisational stressors; Qualitative research paradigm

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

George, C. (2012). Stress through times of organisational change: its relevance to organisational outcomes . (Thesis). AUT University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10292/4630

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

George, Clare. “Stress through times of organisational change: its relevance to organisational outcomes .” 2012. Thesis, AUT University. Accessed November 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10292/4630.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

George, Clare. “Stress through times of organisational change: its relevance to organisational outcomes .” 2012. Web. 28 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

George C. Stress through times of organisational change: its relevance to organisational outcomes . [Internet] [Thesis]. AUT University; 2012. [cited 2020 Nov 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/4630.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

George C. Stress through times of organisational change: its relevance to organisational outcomes . [Thesis]. AUT University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/4630

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


AUT University

2. Ababneh, Omar Mohammed Ali. Conceptualizing and measuring employee engagement, and examining the antecedents of leadership styles and personality attributes .

Degree: AUT University

Employee engagement has received wide attention over the last twenty years from the practitioner community and research scholars. It is claimed that organizations that focus on creating an engaging environment will reap significant benefits in terms of employee productivity, achievement of organizational goals, customer satisfaction, and talent retention (Kim, Kolb, and Kim, 2013; Kuntz and Roberts, 2014). However, fundamental issues revolving around the meaning, measurement, and key antecedents of employee engagement still require further research attention (Saks and Gruman, 2014). In response to these issues, this research aimed to examine the definitions of the engagement construct, develop a reliable and valid engagement scale, and, based on the definitional analysis, examine two key potential antecedents (leadership styles and personality attributes) of employee engagement. An intensive review of the engagement literature was undertaken to identify the conceptual themes shared by the existing approaches to the construct. From this, a working definition of employee engagement was produced guiding the development of a measurement tool to tap each component of the proposed definition. Study I of the research examines the factorial structure, reliability, and discriminant validity of the newly developed engagement scale, using data from 449 employees in New Zealand. The results revealed that employee engagement is a multidimensional construct and internal consistency and discriminant validity of the newly developed instrument reported satisfactory levels. Once the internal consistency, the factorial structure, and validity of the engagement scale had been tested and the final items for the engagement scale had been set (Study I), the second stage of collecting data (Study II) took place. Data gathered in this phase were used to do test-retest reliability, where using the same measurement tool and the same sample under the same response conditions is seen necessary to establish repeatability (Allen and Yen, 1979). Thus, data of Study II were collected from 106 employees who had participated in Study I of the research. The results of Study II revealed that the internal consistency of the engagement scale, developed in Study I, was stable over the two studies. In Study II, grounded in social exchange theory, it was hypothesized that leadership styles (transformational and transactional) and certain personality attributes (conscientiousness, extroversion, proactive, positive affect, and autotelic) are antecedents of employee engagement. The results of Study II also revealed that the hypotheses proposing relationships between transformational leadership, conscientiousness, and positive affect were supported. However, the hypotheses that propose associations between transactional leadership, extroversion, proactive, autotelic, as antecedents of employee engagement were not supported. This research contributes to the existing theory surrounding employee engagement by providing empirical evidence about the… Advisors/Committee Members: Le Fevre, Mark (advisor), Bentley, Tim (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Employee engagement; Engagement scale

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ababneh, O. M. A. (n.d.). Conceptualizing and measuring employee engagement, and examining the antecedents of leadership styles and personality attributes . (Thesis). AUT University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10292/9651

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ababneh, Omar Mohammed Ali. “Conceptualizing and measuring employee engagement, and examining the antecedents of leadership styles and personality attributes .” Thesis, AUT University. Accessed November 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10292/9651.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ababneh, Omar Mohammed Ali. “Conceptualizing and measuring employee engagement, and examining the antecedents of leadership styles and personality attributes .” Web. 28 Nov 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Ababneh OMA. Conceptualizing and measuring employee engagement, and examining the antecedents of leadership styles and personality attributes . [Internet] [Thesis]. AUT University; [cited 2020 Nov 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/9651.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Ababneh OMA. Conceptualizing and measuring employee engagement, and examining the antecedents of leadership styles and personality attributes . [Thesis]. AUT University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/9651

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.


AUT University

3. Mehmood, Iqbal. High-involvement Work Processes, Trust, and Employee Engagement: The Mediating Role of Perceptions of Organisational Justice and Politics .

Degree: AUT University

A still growing body of empirical research has demonstrated that high-involvement work processes (HIWPs) have positive relationships with various measures of organisational effectives. However, critical scholars maintain the following: First, the “how” question of the relationships between HIWPs and outcomes has been rarely investigated, thus leaving a gap in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms through which HRM affects outcomes. Second, the mutual gains model implies that the goal of HRM is to produce beneficial effects for both employees and their organisations. However, research to date has largely focussed on ways to enhance organisational performance, while employee concerns have been a secondary consideration. Third, most studies examining the relationships between HIWPs and outcomes have been cross-sectional. While, methodological researchers argue that since organisational processes are not static, rather develop, change, and evolve overtime, a longitudinal design is better than cross-sectional designs. To address these concerns, which frequently appear in the HRM literature, the primary aim of this study was to explore the mediating role of employees’ perceptions (the so called “black box”) of organisational justice and organisational politics in the relationship between HIWPs and employee outcomes (employee engagement and trust in employer). A secondary aim of this study was to test the proposed model using a longitudinal design. Using a longitudinal design with two data collection periods separated by approximately six months, data were gathered through self-completion questionnaires from non-managerial employees working in the domestic private banks in Pakistan. At Time One, 1554 employees from 233 branches of 14 domestic private banks participated in the survey. Of these employees, 970 participated at Time Two. Data were analysed using structural equation modelling through SPSS AMOS v. 24. The cross-sectional findings (n = 1554) indicated that HIWPs are positively associated with perceptions of organisational justice, employee engagement, trust in employer, and negatively associated with perceptions of organisational politics. Procedural justice and organisational politics partially mediated the relationship between HIWPs and employee engagement; while, informational justice partially mediated the relationship between HIWPs and trust in employer. However, no support was found for the mediating role of other justice dimensions in the relationship between HIWPs and employee outcomes. The longitudinal structural model (n = 970) was then tested using the change scores method (Δ = T2 – T1). The overall findings from the longitudinal structural model validated the cross-sectional findings. However, a few changes in the mediated effects took place suggesting that, besides procedural justice and organisational politics, distributive justice may also be a potential mediator in the relationship between HIWPs and employee engagement and trust in employer. Implications and limitations of these… Advisors/Committee Members: Le Fevre, Mark (advisor), Morrison, Rachel (advisor), Lamm, Felicity (advisor), Macky, Keith (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: High involvement work processess; Organisational justice; Organisational politics; Employee engagement; Trust

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mehmood, I. (n.d.). High-involvement Work Processes, Trust, and Employee Engagement: The Mediating Role of Perceptions of Organisational Justice and Politics . (Thesis). AUT University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10292/12458

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mehmood, Iqbal. “High-involvement Work Processes, Trust, and Employee Engagement: The Mediating Role of Perceptions of Organisational Justice and Politics .” Thesis, AUT University. Accessed November 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10292/12458.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mehmood, Iqbal. “High-involvement Work Processes, Trust, and Employee Engagement: The Mediating Role of Perceptions of Organisational Justice and Politics .” Web. 28 Nov 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Mehmood I. High-involvement Work Processes, Trust, and Employee Engagement: The Mediating Role of Perceptions of Organisational Justice and Politics . [Internet] [Thesis]. AUT University; [cited 2020 Nov 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/12458.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Mehmood I. High-involvement Work Processes, Trust, and Employee Engagement: The Mediating Role of Perceptions of Organisational Justice and Politics . [Thesis]. AUT University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/12458

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

.