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You searched for +publisher:"AUT University" +contributor:("Haemmerle, Enrico"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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AUT University

1. Dowdeswell, Barry Robert. TORUS: Tracing Complex Requirements for Large Cyber-physical Systems .

Degree: AUT University

Cyber-Physical Systems are embedded computers that control complex, physical processes via autonomous peripherals while cooperating as agents in distributed networks. Due to the scale and complexity of the interactions that occur within cyber-physical systems, tracing system requirements accurately and appropriately is extremely hard. The literature confirms that they are even harder to maintain and keep up-to-date during the life of the project. However, the information that requirements traceability provides is a crucial part of determining the completeness of an application. Existing requirements management systems do not scale well and traceability is difficult in such highly heterogeneous environments. This research presents TORUS (Traceability Of Requirements Using Splices), a novel traceability framework that operates outside of, yet connects to, diverse requirements and development environments. Our approach introduces Splices, autonomous traceability data structures that persist trace information through the inevitable changes that occur during system design and development. A Design Science research methodology was adopted to show how the TORUS framework can be applied to cyber-physical systems that employ the IEC 61499 Function Block Architecture. A mechanical item sorting machine is modeled, the requirements of which are described initially using CESAR (Cost-efficient Methods and Processes for Safety-relevant Embedded Systems) requirement templates. These templates help to formalize the pre-Requirement Specification’s free-form text into less ambiguous requirements statements. A domain ontology is defined before modeling the requirements further within the Sparx Enterprise Architect Requirements Management system. Enterprise Architect uses SysML diagrams to capture each requirement in context with its acceptance tests, non-functional and safety requirements while the model can be persisted for later use. Formal mathematical models of requirements, function blocks and splices are presented to show how this trace information can be mined, delivering important project metrics to stakeholders. By capturing not only the current state of the system but also by preserving historic traces, TORUS allows project teams to see a much richer view of their system’s artifacts. In parallel with the creation of these models, prototypes of TORUS were created in Java to explore the proposed splice metadata model. These demonstrated that it is possible to extract trace information directly from both Enterprise Architect models and the nxtStudio IEC 61499 object repository. Using the relationships expressed by these formalisms, the resulting metadata information model for splices is extended to demonstrate how these entities can capture the status of each requirement. We define a set of splices as being the Skein of the system; the set of traces that connect the model and application artifacts together like warp and weft of the threads in a tapestry. Information aggregated in this… Advisors/Committee Members: Sinha, Roopak (advisor), Haemmerle, Enrico (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Cyber-physical Systems; Traceability; Software requirements; IEC 61499 function blocks; TORUS: Traceability of Requirements Using Splices

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dowdeswell, B. R. (n.d.). TORUS: Tracing Complex Requirements for Large Cyber-physical Systems . (Thesis). AUT University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10227

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dowdeswell, Barry Robert. “TORUS: Tracing Complex Requirements for Large Cyber-physical Systems .” Thesis, AUT University. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10227.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dowdeswell, Barry Robert. “TORUS: Tracing Complex Requirements for Large Cyber-physical Systems .” Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Dowdeswell BR. TORUS: Tracing Complex Requirements for Large Cyber-physical Systems . [Internet] [Thesis]. AUT University; [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10227.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Dowdeswell BR. TORUS: Tracing Complex Requirements for Large Cyber-physical Systems . [Thesis]. AUT University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10227

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.


AUT University

2. Tinwala, Farhan Akbari. Horizontal Eccentric Towing and Its Effects on Sprint Performance .

Degree: AUT University

The success of many team sports and track and field athletes can be in part linked with their sprint performance. Therefore, improving sprint performance has been the foci of researchers and practitioners alike. The most commonly used tools that deliver sprint-specific training stimuli are resisted towing devices (RST) (e.g. sleds). RST provides a predominantly concentric (CON) horizontal overload to the musculo-skeletal system, especially in the acceleration phase of the sprint. Perhaps an eccentric (ECC) horizontal overload may be beneficial given the benefits of ECC training; such as, injury prevention and rehabilitation, shift towards faster muscle phenotypes, hypertrophy, strength and power improvements. This resulted in the overarching research question, “Can a novel horizontal ECC towing device improve sprint performance?”. The aim of this thesis was to develop a device that would provide a horizontal ECC stimulus, evaluate the biomechanics of the device and test its effects on sprint performance. A review of existing ECC training devices found limited devices overload in the horizontal plane and none eccentrically overload the musculo-skeletal system in a sprint-specific gait. Therefore, a movement termed horizontal ECC towing (HET) was developed which involves an athlete in a sprint stance trying to move forwards but is being pulled backwards. A device termed the HET device was then developed to automate this movement. The device was powered by a 10 kW electric motor that can tow athletes at velocities up to 3.58 m/s and can tolerate forces up to 2.8 kN. Two familiarisation sessions were found to achieve movement consistency during HET. Biomechanics analysis was conducted to further understand the movement which would help inform training programme development for coaches. Since HET is a novel movement, no research existed. Thus, ECC towing was compared to its opposite, the CON towing direction (CTD). Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) analysis of ground reaction force (GRF) profiles found that the two directions were significantly different (p<0.05) and were applying different movement strategies to produce force. This suggested that different lower limb joints were likely responsible for CON and ECC force production. Vertical and horizontal GRFs were lower in the ECC direction (p<0.05), which may be limited by the coefficient of friction and indicated that isokinetic horizontal towing does not follow the contractile-force-velocity relationship. Power and work analysis of the lower limb joints showed that the ankle and hip joints are absorbing energy and likely dissipating it in the ECC towing direction (ETD). ETD has greater ankle and hip joint power absorption and much smaller power production. A four-week intervention of ECC and CON towing in elite female field hockey players (n=10) resulted in no improvements in split times. There is still an opportunity for practitioners and researchers to apply a unique ECC stimulus to their athletes. The intervention study had its limitations as it was based out of… Advisors/Committee Members: Cronin, John (advisor), Haemmerle, Enrico (advisor), Ross, Angus (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Strength and Condtioning; Biomechanics; Industrial Automation; Resistance Training; Elite Athlete Performance; Design and Development

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tinwala, F. A. (n.d.). Horizontal Eccentric Towing and Its Effects on Sprint Performance . (Thesis). AUT University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10292/13448

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tinwala, Farhan Akbari. “Horizontal Eccentric Towing and Its Effects on Sprint Performance .” Thesis, AUT University. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10292/13448.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tinwala, Farhan Akbari. “Horizontal Eccentric Towing and Its Effects on Sprint Performance .” Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Tinwala FA. Horizontal Eccentric Towing and Its Effects on Sprint Performance . [Internet] [Thesis]. AUT University; [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/13448.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Tinwala FA. Horizontal Eccentric Towing and Its Effects on Sprint Performance . [Thesis]. AUT University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/13448

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

.