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Title Impact of Children with Developmental Disabilities and Behavior Problems on Parenting Stress
URL
Publication Date
Degree MA
Discipline/Department Psychology
Degree Level masters
University/Publisher The Ohio State University
Abstract The current study sought to further characterize the predictive relationship between child behavior problems and parenting stress in the developmental disability population. Previous studies on parenting stress have explored risk factors for increased parenting stress, but few have examined the role of child characteristics, such as diagnosis, or used complex estimation procedures to characterize the relationship. Structural equation modeling was implemented to conduct analyses on the moderating effects of child age and developmental disability diagnoses as moderators of the behavior problems – parenting stress relationship. A structural model representation of parenting stress was confirmed using four factors: personal, financial, health insurance, and service provider stressors. This model confirmed a significant predictive relationship between behavior problems and parenting stress. Early childhood was found to significantly predict parenting stress above and beyond middle and late childhood. A diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability were also significantly more likely to contribute to parenting stress compared to other developmental disability diagnoses, such as developmental delay. These findings support the literature on risk factors for parenting stress in the developmental disability population. Strengths of the study include the use of weighted data and stratified sampling to yield estimates that are representative of the developmental disability population. Limitations and recommendations for furtherexplorations of the behavior problems – parenting stress relationship using longitudinal SEM modeling are discussed.
Subjects/Keywords Psychology; Behavior problems; developmental disabilities; parents; autism; intellectual disability; developmental delay; age
Contributors Havercamp, Susan (Advisor)
Language en
Rights unrestricted ; This thesis or dissertation is protected by copyright: all rights reserved. It may not be copied or redistributed beyond the terms of applicable copyright laws.
Country of Publication us
Format application/pdf
Record ID oai:etd.ohiolink.edu:osu1354289996
Repository ohiolink
Date Indexed 2020-10-19
Grantor The Ohio State University

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…moderates the behavior-stress relationship, with an ASD diagnosis contributing to higher parenting stress than other developmental disability diagnoses (specifically intellectual disability and developmental delay). o Families of children with…

…disability in the 2009 – 2010 sample (n = 10,390) will be used. Developmental disability diagnoses probed for during the interview were: autism spectrum disorders (ASD), intellectual disability, developmental delay, Down syndrome, and…

…on the predictive relationship between child behavior problems and parenting stress than a developmental delay or intellectual disability diagnosis. In other words, it is anticipated that parenting stress will be higher in families in which the child…

…demonstrates behavior problems and has an ASD diagnosis than in families in which the child has an intellectual disability or a developmental delay in addition to behavior problems. Late childhood is predicted to strengthen the behavior problems predicting…

…4: Discussion……………………………………………………………………42 Effect of Age……………………………………………………………………..44 Effect of Developmental Disability Diagnosis…………………………………..46 Effect of Intellectual Disability Diagnosis……………………………………….46 Impact of Support Services…

…disorders (ASDs), intellectual disability, cerebral palsy, and other developmental disabilities or delays, was 6.08% in the United States (Boyle et al., 2011), an estimate has become unstable due to the increased prevalence of ASDs (…

…as well as a decrease in child behavior problems with age. Initial parenting stress was significantly higher in the developmental delay group, although there were no significant group differences in rates of stress decline over time. It was concluded…

developmental delay), some studies indicating that such families experience difficulties no more challenging than families of typically developing children (Lach et al.,2009). In contrast, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that…

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