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Title Development and validation of a human knee joint finite element model for tissue stress and strain predictions during exercise
URL
Publication Date
Degree MS
Discipline/Department Mechanical Engineering
Degree Level masters
University/Publisher Cal Poly
Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative condition of cartilage and is the leading cost of disability in the United States. Motion analysis experiments in combination with knee-joint finite element (FE) analysis may be used to identify exercises that maintain knee-joint osteochondral (OC) loading at safe levels for patients at high-risk for knee OA, individuals with modest OC defects, or patients rehabilitating after surgical interventions. Therefore, a detailed total knee-joint FE model was developed by modifying open-source knee-joint geometries in order to predict OC tissue stress and strain during the stance phase of gait. The model was partially validated for predicting the timing and locations of maximum contact parameters (contact pressure, contact area, and principal Green-Lagrangian strain), but over-estimated contact parameters compared with both published in vivo studies and other FE analyses of the stance phase of gait. This suggests that the model geometry and kinematic boundary conditions utilized in this FE model are appropriate, but limitations in the material properties used, as well as potentially the loading boundary conditions represent primary areas for improvement.
Subjects/Keywords Osteoarthritis; biomechanics; finite element; motion capture; articular cartilage; stance phase of gait; Biomechanical Engineering
Contributors Stephen Klisch
Country of Publication us
Record ID oai:digitalcommons.calpoly.edu:theses-2217
Repository calpoly
Date Retrieved
Date Indexed 2020-04-26
Created Date 2013-12-01 08:00:00

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…stages of the stance phase of gait. .......................................................... 22 Table 2.5: Damping stabilization factors used for each loading case and their respective ratios of viscous force (VF) to total forces (TF)…

…posterior patellar, and superior lateral (left) and medial tibial (right) cartilages for different loading conditions during the stance phase of gait (PX=proximal, D=distal, A=anterior, and PO=posterior direction)…

…the stance phase of gait (PX=proximal, D=distal, A=anterior, and PO=posterior direction). ................................................. 40 Figure 3.3: Maximum principal Green-Lagrangian strain on the anterior and distal aspects of the…

…femoral, posterior patellar, and superior lateral (left) and medial tibial (right) cartilages for different loading conditions during the stance phase of gait (PX=proximal, D=distal, A=anterior, and PO=posterior direction)…

…mathematically modeled as a biphasic, fibril-reinforced composite [37]. However, this model examines the single leg stance phase of the gait cycle, which exhibits short loading times compared to the viscoelastic time constant of nearly 1500 seconds for…

…viscoelastic tissues, like articular cartilage [39]. However, similarly to articular cartilage, the short loading times during the stance phase of gait and a large viscoelastic time constant make it reasonable to model meniscus tissue as a single…

…forces (which include 4 distinct muscles that channel into the patellar tendon) during the stance phase of gait from externally obtained experimental marker data. OpenSim’s Gait 2392 model of the lower leg was used for simulations to determine…

…joint contact forces and moments for the stance phase of gait. The Gait 2392 model represents the human musculoskeletal system with rigid bones, a total of 23 degrees of freedom at the joints, and 92 actuators representing 76 muscles active in motions of…

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