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Title Comparative analysis of the VRF system and conventional HVAC systems, focused on life-cycle cost
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Publication Date
Date Accessioned
Degree MS
Discipline/Department Architecture
Degree Level masters
University/Publisher Georgia Tech
Abstract As concern for the environment has been dramatically raised over the recent decade, all fields have increased their efforts to reduce impact on environment. The field of construction has responded and started to develop the building performance strategies as well as regulations to reduce the impact on the environment. HVAC systems are obviously one of the key factors of building energy consumption. This study investigates the system performance and economic value of variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems relative to conventional HVAC systems by comparing life-cycle cost of VRF systems to that of conventional HVAC systems. VRF systems consist mainly of one outdoor unit and several indoor units. The outdoor unit provides all indoor units with cooled or heated refrigerant; with these refrigerants, each indoor unit serves one zone, delivering either heating or cooling. Due to its special configuration, the VRF system can cool some zones and heat other zones simultaneously. This comparative analysis covers six building types—medium office, standalone retail, primary school, hotel, hospital, and apartment—in a eleven climate zones—1A Miami, 2A Houston, 2B Phoenix, 3A Atlanta, 3B Las Vegas, 3C San Francisco, 4A Baltimore, 4B Albuquerque, 4C Seattle, 5A Chicago, and 5B Boulder. Energy simulations conducted by EnergyPlus are done for each building type in each climate zone. Base cases for each simulation are the reference models that U.S. Department of Energy has developed, whereas the alternative case is the same building in the same location with a VRF system. The life-cycle cost analysis provides Net Savings, Savingto- Investment ratio, and payback years. The major findings are that the VRF system has an average of thirty-nine percent HVAC energy consumption savings. As for the results of the life-cycle cost analysis, the average of simple payback period is twelve years.
Subjects/Keywords LCCA; VRF system; Life cycle costing; Sustainable development; Sustainable construction
Contributors Augenbroe, Godfried (advisor); Brown, Jason (committee member)
Language en
Country of Publication us
Record ID handle:1853/50227
Repository gatech
Date Indexed 2018-01-11
Issued Date 2013-11-26 00:00:00
Note [degree] M.S.;

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…Table 42 Specific information of VRF system and the base case for LCC 63 Table 43 LCC calculation of VRF system 64 Table 44 LCC calculation of the base case 64 Table 45 Net saving calculation 65 Table 46 SIR calculation 65…

…Figure 10 Climate zone classification 25 Figure 11 VRF system diagram 28 Figure 12 VRF system modeling diagram with or without DOAS 30 Figure 13 Size modifier curve 47 ix SUMMARY As concern for the environment has been…

…on the environment. HVAC systems are obviously one of the key factors of building energy consumption. This study investigates the system performance and economic value of variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems relative to conventional HVAC…

…refrigerants, each indoor unit serves one zone, delivering either heating or cooling. Due to its special configuration, the VRF system can cool some zones and heat other zones simultaneously. This comparative analysis covers six building types—medium office…

VRF system. The life-cycle cost analysis provides Net Savings, Savingto-Investment ratio, and payback years. The major findings are that the VRF system has an average of thirty-nine percent HVAC energy consumption savings. As for the results of the…

…analysis is a straightforward method of economic analysis and evaluates entire costs through the lifecycle of the system, it is an appropriate method to compare economic effectiveness of VRF systems to conventional HVAC systems. This is further supported by…

…investment and energy prices. These present values yield the life-cycle cost by accumulating them all. 13 CHAPTER 3 CALCULATING LIFE-CYCLE COST Calculation of Life-cycle Cost This study is to compare a VRF system with conventional HVAC system through a…

…reference buildings (with their published EnergyPlus energy models) as the conventional base cases. The alternative of each base case is the same building but now equipped with a VRF system. The DOE reference building models represent reasonably…

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