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Title Frequency, Attention, and Phonetic Characteristics that Influence the Right-Ear Advantage for Speech Perception
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Publication Date
Date Accessioned
Degree MA
Discipline/Department Clinical
Degree Level masters
University/Publisher University of Houston
Abstract The right-ear advantage (REA) for linguistic stimuli (Kimura, 1961, 1967) is thought to represent an asymmetry of speech perception favoring the left hemisphere. This study seeks to clarify how the REA is altered by: attention instructions, filtering of stimuli, background noise, and phonetic properties of stimuli, viz., voice onset time (VOT) and place of articulation (POA). Participants heard monosyllabic rhyming words from the Halwes (1990) Fused Dichotic Word Test and were instructed to attend to the left or right ear, or to divide attention equally. Stimuli in Experiment 1 were unfiltered, high-pass filtered, or low-pass filtered, and stimuli in Experiment 2 were presented with no noise, white noise, high-pass filtered noise, or low-pass filtered noise. The initial consonants of each dichotic pair were categorized according to POA (bilabial, alveolar, or velar) and VOT (voiced or unvoiced). Repeated-measures ANOVAs performed on laterality ratios showed statistically significant main effects for attention, background noise, VOT, and POA. Right-ear attention, the absence of background noise, and bilateral bilabial presentation enhanced the right-ear advantage. Furthermore, attention interacted with background noise, POA, and VOT.
Subjects/Keywords Speech laterality; speech perception; dichotic listening
Contributors Hiscock, Merrill (advisor); Foss, Donald J. (committee member); Jansen, Ben H. (committee member)
Language en
Country of Publication us
Record ID handle:10657/223
Repository tdl
Date Indexed 2020-04-11
Grantor University of Houston
Issued Date 2012-04-19 00:00:00

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…consonant as the respective factors Speech Perception 12 and laterality ratio as the dependent variable. Another 3x3x4 repeated-measures ANOVA was computed with filtering, attention, and VOT of the initial consonant as factors. The Bonferroni correction…

…the potential to influence the overall laterality of speech processing. Hugdahl (2000) proposed a compromise solution to the apparent conflict between Kimura’s structural model and Kinsbourne’s attentional model of speech perception by…

Speech Perception viii Figure 6 ……..….……………………………………………….…………………….….. 43 Effects of noise and attention on the REA in Experiment 2. Figure 7 ……….…………………..…………………………….…………………….….. 44 Effects of attention and place of articulation on the REA in…

…Experiment 2. The first POA category applies to the LE stimulus and the second POA category applies to the RE stimulus. Speech Perception 1 Frequency, Attention, and Phonetic Characteristics That Influence the Right-Ear Advantage for Speech Perception…

…Much of what is understood about speech perception involves the transmission of the auditory signal within the ear and auditory nerve. Much less is known about what happens when the auditory signal reaches the cortex and undergoes further processing…

…are presented in dichotic competition Speech Perception 2 people tend to perceive the stimuli presented to their right ear more often than the stimuli presented to the left ear. The observed asymmetry of speech perception is theorized to be the…

…explanation, arguing that asymmetries of speech perception depend on lateral shifts of attention (Kinsbourne, 1970, 1973). Before Kimura had noted the REA, Broadbent (1954) had shown that attention is an integral component to the perception…

…of speech when there are competing signals. Kinsbourne (1970) applied such early cognitive discoveries in his explanation of the REA, arguing that it is a function of attentional tendencies, rather than a phenomenon arising solely from…

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