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Title Bilingualism in Minority Settings in Canada: Fusion or Assimilation?
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University/Publisher University of Ottawa
Abstract Despite the prevalence of bilingual identity among linguistic minority youth in Canada, few studies have empirically investigated its acculturative consequences. This study explores the nature of bilingual identity, as determined by language confidence, in various ethnolinguistic contexts. More specifically, it investigates the relation between language confidence and identity as moderated by ethnolinguistic vitality. It also verifies whether bilinguals can be distinguished from predominantly unilingual participants on factors related to the maintenance of identity, namely subjective ethnolinguistic vitality and language usage and evaluates the impact of ethnolinguistic vitality on these differences. Data from the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities collected by Statistics Canada among francophones outside of Quebec and anglophones in Quebec (N = 7377) was used for analysis. The results of univariate and multivariate analyses of variance show that language confidence is significantly related to levels of identity for all regions. Bilinguals are significantly distinct from predominantly monolingual participants on most factors for maintenance of identity. However, among all francophone samples, bilinguals most resemble the franco-dominant participants. The implications of these findings on the understanding of the nature of bilingual identity are discussed. Malgré la prévalence de l’identité bilingue parmi les jeunes de groupes minoritaires linguistiques au Canada, peu d’études ont vérifié ses conséquences acculturatives de façon empirique. Cette étude explore la nature de l’identité bilingue telle que déterminée par la confiance langagière, dans divers contextes ethnolinguistiques. De façon plus spécifique, la relation entre la confiance langagière et l’identité, modérée par la vitalité ethnolinguistique est examinée. Par ailleurs, l’étude explore si les gens bilingues se distinguent de ceux qui ont une prédominance langagière sur des facteurs liés au maintien de l’identité, soit la vitalité ethnolinguistique subjective et l’utilisation langagière, et évalue l’impact de la vitalité ethnolinguistique sur ces différences. Les analyses ont été menées à partir des données de l’Enquête sur la vitalité des minorités de langue officielle de Statistique Canada recueillies auprès des francophones de l’extérieur du Québec et des anglophones du Québec (N = 7377). Les résultats d’analyses univariées et multivariées dévoilent que pour chacune des régions ethnolinguistiques, la confiance langagière est significativement liée à l’identité. Les bilingues se distinguent significativement de ceux à prédominance langagière sur la plupart des facteurs importants au maintien de l’identité. Toutefois, parmi les groupes francophones, les bilingues ressemblent le plus aux participants franco-dominants. Les conséquences de ces résultats sur la compréhension de la nature de l’identité bilingue sont discutées.
Subjects/Keywords bilingualism; hybrid identity; ethnolinguistic vitality; subjective vitality; language confidence; language usage; identity; Statistics Canada; bilinguisme; identité hybride; vitalité ethnolinguistique; vitalité subjective; confiance langagière; utilisation langagière; identité; Statistique Canada
Language en
Country of Publication ca
Record ID handle:10393/24359
Repository ottawa
Date Indexed 2018-01-03
Issued Date 2013-01-01 00:00:00

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…namely SEV and language usage and to evaluate the impact of ELV on these differences. Method The data that was used for this study was collected by Statistics Canada in 2006 as part of the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM…

…beliefs about one’s group’s vitality and language usage. Subjective vitality. Subjective ethnolinguistic vitality (SEV), corresponds to the cognitive-affective disposition of group members towards the state of their ethnolinguistic group, (…

…language usage (Allard & Landry, 1994). In turn, language usage affects one’s acculturative strategy leading to assimilative consequences for those with beliefs reflective of a low vitality. In contrast, those with beliefs reflective of a high…

…second language learning then, is proposed to be related to variances in beliefs about one’s group. Language usage. Language usage corresponds to the degree to which a language is used in various aspects of public and private life. The importance of…

…language usage, or contact with a language and social networks, has been highlighted in the model discussed above as crucial to the understanding of the link between subjective vitality and identity. Nevertheless, it is on its own fundamental to L2…

…confidence, or the perception of one’s own communicative capabilities, leads to greater identification with the language group (Noels & Clément, 1996) and to increased usage of a language (Clément, Baker & MacIntyre, 2003; Noels & Clément, 1996…

…Abrams, O’Connor, & Giles, 2002; Clément, 2008; Noels & Clément, 1996). As such, language usage would be an important indicator of the type of bilingualism developed in a particular context. (Clément, 2008; Clément & Kruidenier, 1985; Gaudet…

…Clment, 2005; Kim, 1988). Given that both subjective vitality and language usage tend to be related to acculturative outcomes, it should be the case that bilinguals can be distinguished from unilingual-dominant participants on these variables. It may…

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