Full Record

New Search | Similar Records

Author
Title Audiovisual Prior Entry: Evidence from the Synchrony Comparison Judgment Task
URL
Publication Date
Date Accessioned
University/Publisher University of Ottawa
Abstract Prior entry refers to the notion that attended stimuli are perceived sooner than unattended stimuli due to a speed up in sensory processing. The century long debate regarding the prior entry phenomenon’s existence has always been grounded in the degree to which the methods applied to the problem allow for cognitive response bias. This thesis continues that trend by applying the synchrony comparison judgment method to the problem of audiovisual prior entry. Experiment 1 put this method into context with two other common psychophysical methods – the temporal order judgment and the synchrony judgment – that have been applied to the prior entry problem. The results of this experiment indicated that the temporal order judgment method was out of step with the other two methods in terms of the parameter estimates typically used to evaluate prior entry. Experiment 2 evaluated and confirmed that a specific response bias helps explain the difference in parameter estimates between the temporal order judgment method and the other two. Experiment 3 evaluated the precision of the synchrony comparison judgment method. The results indicated that the method was precise enough to detect potentially small prior entry effect sizes, and that it afforded the ability to detect those participants with points of subjective synchrony that deviate substantially from zero. Finally, Experiment 4 applied the synchrony comparison judgment method to a prior entry scenario. A prior entry effect was not realized. Overall, this thesis highlights the drawbacks of all previous methods used to evaluate audiovisual perception, including prior entry, and validates the use of the synchrony comparison judgment. Further, due to the resistance of this method to response bias, this result now stands as the most convincing evidence yet against the prior entry phenomenon.
Subjects/Keywords prior entry; attention; temporal order judgment; synchrony comparison judgment; synchrony judgment; response bias
Language en
Country of Publication ca
Record ID handle:10393/23100
Repository ottawa
Date Indexed 2018-01-03
Issued Date 2012-01-01 00:00:00

Sample Search Hits | Sample Images

…error was more typical. The law of prior entry was born out of the effort to try to explain the typically negative errors seen in the complication experiment (Boring, 1957). Titchener (1908) believed that the observers were…

…the perceived position of the pendulum when the click occurred happened at 30 when he attended to the pendulum arrow, and between 10 and 15 when he attended to the click, thus, directing confirming the predictions of the law of prior entry. 4…

…While the law of prior entry would become one of Titchener’s seven fundamental laws of attention, not everyone at the time subscribed to this view. Von Tchisch (1885) ascribed the negative localization errors of his complication experiments to…

…occulomotor muscles. He further suggested that observers might produce the seeming prior entry effect due to their desire to perform as well as their colleagues (Titchener, 1908). In addition, the complication experiments of Angell and Pierce…

…to eye movements rather than the attentional set of the observer. These criticisms are noteworthy in the sense that they represent the beginning of what will become a series of criticisms of the methods used to test the law of prior entry, resulting…

…alternative method that did not involve motion was needed to yield a more ideal investigation of the problem. The Temporal Order Judgment Method The temporal order judgment (TOJ) method was introduced to the problem of prior entry to avoid the…

…displacement is inferred from a spatial displacement, the TOJ task measures temporal displacement directly. That is, the law of prior entry suggests that the visual spatial displacement of the arrow of a swinging pendulum relative to an auditory event is due to…

…the point at which the observer is maximally uncertain about the order of the stimuli, and will be marked by an equal number of ‘light first’ and ‘sound first’ judgments (see Figure 1A). According to the law of prior entry, the PSS should…

.